Cleaning the uncleanable:

Cleaning the uncleanable:

Post by Palit, Sum » Sat, 12 Dec 1992 01:24:00


Anybody out there know how to clean leather gloves, particularly the really
soft foil varieties? How about lames? I've tried cleaning mine with a soft
cloth and the mildest dishwashing soap around, then drying it in the sun on
a deck-chair or something flat. Doesn't work for the really big stains, though

Suman

 
 
 

Cleaning the uncleanable:

Post by Richard Anders » Sun, 13 Dec 1992 01:49:17

Quote:

> Anybody out there know how to clean leather gloves, particularly the really
> soft foil varieties? How about lames? I've tried cleaning mine with a soft
> cloth and the mildest dishwashing soap around, then drying it in the sun on
> a deck-chair or something flat. Doesn't work for the really big stains, though

> Suman

I don't know about cleaning them up after the fact, but one trick I learned
that helped keep the lames clean and useful a lot longer was to take it into
the shower with you after a meet and rinse it out immediatly. Most of the
stains on lames are oxidation mediated by the salt in your sweat, so washing
away the salt, and then just letting the water dry normally helps a lot.

Maybe you could try washing it with a mild solution of some chemical reducer?
That would take a better chmist than I to answer for sure however.

Eric

 
 
 

Cleaning the uncleanable:

Post by Alaric Tekiah » Sun, 13 Dec 1992 10:21:51

]
] Anybody out there know how to clean leather gloves, particularly the really
] soft foil varieties? How about lames? I've tried cleaning mine with a soft
] cloth and the mildest dishwashing soap around, then drying it in the sun on
] a deck-chair or something flat. Doesn't work for the really big stains, though

In a word (OK, three words):

        Try saddle soap.

(Trust me.  I'm a saddler, among other things.)

For the gloves, my recommended technique is:
        (1)     Put the gloves on.
        (2)     Wearing the gloves, wash your hands with saddle soap.
                (Use warm water, but NOT hot.)
        (3)     Keep the gloves on until they're completely dry.

--
      "Eternal vigilance is the price of freedom."  --  Thomas Jefferson
    ......................................................................

      PGP 2.0 - Freeware public-key data encryption.  Get it and use it!


 
 
 

Cleaning the uncleanable:

Post by David M Kreindl » Mon, 14 Dec 1992 02:22:35

While we're on the subject of cleaning, does anyone out there know what
can be done to a kevlar jacket, specifically with the goal of getting
some rust stains off?  I know kevlar shouldn't be hung out in the sun to
dry (-UV rays destroy the kevlar matrix, don't'cha know,...-) but is
there anything else that should be avoided when laundering kevlar?

(Would someone off in the land of Janet do the rest of the world a
favour, ring up Leon Paul, and ask them?  Their number is 01-405-3832.
Much appreciated....)
--

"Sometimes you're the windshield / Sometimes you're the bug...." - Dire Straits

 
 
 

Cleaning the uncleanable:

Post by Stuart M Castergi » Tue, 15 Dec 1992 15:02:27

Quote:

>For the gloves, my recommended technique is:
>    (1)     Put the gloves on.
>    (2)     Wearing the gloves, wash your hands with saddle soap.
>            (Use warm water, but NOT hot.)
>    (3)     Keep the gloves on until they're completely dry.

I don't know about anybody else, but as long as I am wearing the
glvoe, it will *never* be completely dry. I sweat too much. I always
bring two or three gloves to a competition, because after two rough
pools, a glove is soaked through and starts to get slippery (I can
judge how well I'm doing by how many gloves I go through in a
tournament!)

My hands sweat so much that I simply don't make much effort to save my
gloves. I never buy the top-priced gloves, because no matter how good
they are I'm guaranteed to destroy them.

Same thing with lames. I have one that has lasted me quite a while now
-- the rinsing in water trick helps. And I also unfasten the neck of
my lame between every bout, to get it away from my neck. The neck is
where mine always go bad.

And as long as I'm talking about sweat.... :-)

Because of my profuse and corrosive perspiration, I seem to have a lot
more trouble with blade corrosion than some other people. Oh, how I
envied my teammate, Csaga Hovanyi, back at Ohio State. Her blades were
always so shiny and bright! I swear her sweat was less corrosive than
mine.

Anybody have any suggestions for keeping blades from rusting? I wipe
mine down, but I am loath to oil them, because I am afraid of what the
oil will do to the glue on the wire -- I have enough problems with
wires lifting out as it is. I am also worried that oil will get all
over my nice fencing whites or will get in and gum up my tip.

I tried acid-bluing on a couple blades, like you would do wiht a gun
barrel, just as a lark. But the additional corrision resistance was
minimal, and I have this vague impression that it made those two
blades more brittle. (I, too, have noticed that blades, both maraging
and non, seem to break more often these days. I had one blade that
lasted me three varsity seasons at Ohio State before breaking. Now I
feel lucky if a blade makes it through a whole year -- and I don't
fence with anywhere near the frequency that I did then.

--

Fiver: "Oh, Hazel, look! The field! It's covered with ***!"
Hazel: "Don't be silly, it's only the light of the sunset." -- Watership Down

 
 
 

Cleaning the uncleanable:

Post by Randy M Brun » Tue, 15 Dec 1992 17:55:42

Excerpts from netnews.rec.sport.fencing: 14-Dec-92 Re: Cleaning the

Quote:
>I don't know about anybody else, but as long as I am wearing the
>glvoe, it will *never* be completely dry. I sweat too much. I always
>bring two or three gloves to a competition, because after two rough
>pools, a glove is soaked through and starts to get slippery (I can
>judge how well I'm doing by how many gloves I go through in a
>tournament!)

>My hands sweat so much that I simply don't make much effort to save my
>gloves. I never buy the top-priced gloves, because no matter how good
>they are I'm guaranteed to destroy them.

    The best solution, as you say, seems to be to throw them away and
get a new one after you wear one out. (I admit though it's not
"environmentally correct.") I have never experienced a problem with
slipperiness though. I guess I just don't try hard enough. :)

Quote:
>Because of my profuse and corrosive perspiration, I seem to have a lot
>more trouble with blade corrosion than some other people. Oh, how I
>envied my teammate, Csaga Hovanyi, back at Ohio State. Her blades were
>always so shiny and bright! I swear her sweat was less corrosive than
>mine.

>Anybody have any suggestions for keeping blades from rusting? I wipe
>mine down, but I am loath to oil them, because I am afraid of what the
>oil will do to the glue on the wire -- I have enough problems with
>wires lifting out as it is. I am also worried that oil will get all
>over my nice fencing whites or will get in and gum up my tip.

    I'm assuming your perspiration causes your blades to rust because
your damp clothing is rubbing against them in your fencing bag. There is
an easy way to keep your weapons shiny and your jacket free of rust
stains: Cut a three-foot long piece of plastic tubing (only, say, an
inch in diameter) and attach a *** band or string to one end. Slip
these tubes over your weapons when you're done. Lots of fencers do this.
You don't need extra compartments in your bags and everything still
stays clean.
    And just for the record... Women do have a different pH level in
their perspiration than men. :)
 
 
 

Cleaning the uncleanable:

Post by Dick Ki » Wed, 16 Dec 1992 04:09:16


Quote:

>Anybody have any suggestions for keeping blades from rusting? I wipe
>mine down, but I am loath to oil them, because I am afraid of what the
>oil will do to the glue on the wire -- I have enough problems with
>wires lifting out as it is. I am also worried that oil will get all
>over my nice fencing whites or will get in and gum up my tip.

If you follow my suggestion, your jacket will stay cleaner, but OTHERS will
  hate you if you oil your blade.

Let me suggest that you use "blade ***s".

Go down to the local hardware store and buy 1/2" white PVC pipe.  It comes in
integral-foot lengths, and a 3 foot is just right for our 90 cm [35 inches]
blades.  If you're a cheat who uses 36" or linger blades i have no sympathy
(##)) .

With blade ***s your blades don't have to face the Yecchy Fency Jacket Test.

While you're in the hardware store buy an abrasive-coated foam-*** block,
called a sanding block.  Buy the soft kind.  The clerks will be able to point
you in the right direction if you bring a weapon and show them what it is you
want to derust.  Your blade won't rust as fast with blade ***s as without,
but they will rust a little, and it's a bit of a psychological lift to brighten
up your blade the evening before the Big Deal Tournament.

I'm an epee fencer, and a hit against a rust spot is a touch against me if it
registers [as it will if the rust successfully insulates his tip from the
metal] so this is serious business to me.  Do you fence foil?  If so, the worst
you can get from a rust spot is a WHITE light.

-dk

 
 
 

Cleaning the uncleanable:

Post by Rick Cavas » Wed, 16 Dec 1992 05:20:32


|> ]
|> ] Anybody out there know how to clean leather gloves, particularly the really
|> ] soft foil varieties? How about lames? I've tried cleaning mine with a soft
|> ] cloth and the mildest dishwashing soap around, then drying it in the sun on
|> ] a deck-chair or something flat. Doesn't work for the really big stains, though
|>
|> In a word (OK, three words):
|>
|>   Try saddle soap.
|>
|> (Trust me.  I'm a saddler, among other things.)
|>
|> For the gloves, my recommended technique is:
|>   (1)     Put the gloves on.
|>   (2)     Wearing the gloves, wash your hands with saddle soap.
|>           (Use warm water, but NOT hot.)
|>   (3)     Keep the gloves on until they're completely dry.
|>
|>
|> --
|>       "Eternal vigilance is the price of freedom."  --  Thomas Jefferson
|>     ......................................................................

|>       PGP 2.0 - Freeware public-key data encryption.  Get it and use it!

An oil soap like 'Murphie's' might also do a good job (diluted of course).
Rubbing small amounts (I assume you don't want your fencing gloves getting
too slick) of neatsfoot or mink oil will help to keep the leather supple
despite the repeated washings.

Rick C.

 
 
 

Cleaning the uncleanable:

Post by David Svobo » Wed, 16 Dec 1992 08:28:29


|]
|] Anybody out there know how to clean leather gloves

|In a word (OK, three words):
|
|       Try saddle soap.
|
|(Trust me.  I'm a saddler, among other things.)

Good idea.  (Trust me, I'm a leather-clad biker, among other things. :-)

|For the gloves, my recommended technique is:
|       (1)     Put the gloves on.
|       (2)     Wearing the gloves, wash your hands with saddle soap.
|               (Use warm water, but NOT hot.)
|       (3)     Keep the gloves on until they're completely dry.

If you use just saddle soap on soft leather, you will rob the leather
of a lot of it's oils, and it will dry out.  Dry leather in a sweaty
environment will quickly destroy it.  To dress the leather (replace
the oils), use Mink Oil or Neats Foot Oil.  Rub the oil in once the
leather is dry after cleaning, and let it sit for a day or two.  The
leather will feel slightly oily to the touch for a short while, but
not slippery, and the persperation salt will not destroy the leather
so easily.

Oh, don't use anything with Silicon in it.  That will seal the leather
against water intrusion, but it will also lock in any latent moisture
(like humidity) and the leather will rot most unpleasantly.

                        Dave Svoboda

 
 
 

Cleaning the uncleanable:

Post by Alaric Tekiah » Wed, 16 Dec 1992 11:30:01


] Anybody have any suggestions for keeping blades from rusting? I wipe
] mine down, but I am loath to oil them, because I am afraid of what the
] oil will do to the glue on the wire -- I have enough problems with
] wires lifting out as it is. I am also worried that oil will get all
] over my nice fencing whites or will get in and gum up my tip.
]
] I tried acid-bluing on a couple blades, like you would do wiht a gun
] barrel, just as a lark. But the additional corrision resistance was
] minimal, and I have this vague impression that it made those two
] blades more brittle.

Two suggestions:

(1)     You could try wiping the blade down with a silicone spray.  The
        stuff is widely used for damp-proofing electronics, among other
        purposes.  It will actually displace moisture.  Silicone sprays
        are also clear, so in the unlikely event that you should get
        some on your whites, it shouldn't show.  It also shouldn't
        affect the glue.

(2)     You could try wiping your blade with a cloth *barely* dampened
        with orthophosphoric acid (available in many paint stores), if
        you're not afraid to put chemicals on it.  Phosphoric acid will
        create an inert surface layer of iron phosphate, which will give
        the steel a grayish appearance.

Personally, I'd use the silicone spray - or just light oil.  Believe it
or not, many of my blades - particularly ones I might be eating off -
get wiped with olive oil.  The thing to remember here is that if you
can see the oil on the surface of the steel, then you used too much oil.

--
      "Eternal vigilance is the price of freedom."  --  Thomas Jefferson
    ......................................................................

      PGP 2.0 - Freeware public-key data encryption.  Get it and use it!

 
 
 

Cleaning the uncleanable:

Post by Jane Beckm » Thu, 17 Dec 1992 11:23:39

You might want to try the old Victorian trick for washing
leather gloves, which I have used with some success.  Milk.  

Get a basin.  Pour a pint of milk in it.  Get some ivory soap.
Put the gloves on your hands and wash them in the milk, like
you are washing your hands, using small amounts of soap.
Swish them around in the milk.  Dump that milk, and rinse with
fresh milk.  Hang to dry.  It sounds weird, but it takes out
most of the gunk, and doesn't even smell too much like sour
milk, afterward.  ;-)  Of course, if the stains are *too* bad,
there are things this may not cure...
--

"The field of pseudo-science hasn't progressed much in ten
years, except to gain access to the net." --from ca.earthquakes

 
 
 

Cleaning the uncleanable:

Post by Jane Beckm » Fri, 18 Dec 1992 09:47:41

Quote:
>Rubbing small amounts (I assume you don't want your fencing gloves getting
>too slick) of neatsfoot or mink oil will help to keep the leather supple
>despite the repeated washings.

A caveat: neatsfoot oil will discolor the leather.
Particularily if you have those nice *white* fencing gauntlets
that I've lusted after so many times...  I tried neatsfoot oil
on some white kid gloves I had, once.  Afterwards, I had some
nice *buff* colored kid gloves.  They stayed that way.

--

"The field of pseudo-science hasn't progressed much in ten
years, except to gain access to the net." --from ca.earthquakes

 
 
 

Cleaning the uncleanable:

Post by Christopher J. Wo » Mon, 21 Dec 1992 09:15:46

On cleaning lames....

My old coach used to tell me to use Woolite to clean my lame.  
It actually worked.  It got rid of those yucky green spots.
Hey, it's good enough for those delicate sweaters...
I didn't notice any damage to my lame.  So, I guess it worked.
Since I haven't fenced for a couple of years, I'm not sure what kind of "new"
materials comprise of lames nowadays.  Back then, I had a non-stainless steel
lame.  This was right before the stainless steel lames were introduced.
So, are stainless steel lames the norm nowadays?

Anyway, the Woolite should probably still work.  Don't hold me to this
advice though.  You might want to spot test your lame with the Woolite
first before you dunk the whole thing in the stuff.

Hope this helps...

regards,
chris wong