women's sabre

women's sabre

Post by obrie.. » Sat, 03 Apr 1993 21:33:36


  Women's sabre has just been sanctioned by the Canadian Fencing Federation
this year. Altho it has been fenced regularly on the eastern varsity
ciruit in Canada, it has attracted little attention in regular competitive
circles. All the women on the National rankings in sabre are from the
East (Ont, Que, The Maritimes). In the West only one province - Saskatchewan -
offers it at tournaments, and even here it has only been run once, and then
there weren't enough entries to make it worth points (min. 6 entries to
be a points-gathering tournament).

  I'm very interested in hearing what sort of experience others have had
with Women's Sabre. To the best of my knowledge it is not yet FIE sanctioned.
My coach just shrugs and says "if it isn't an Olympic weapon what's the point?"
and points to declining numbers of women in epee as being far more important
than trying to encourage Women's Sabre. What do other people think? Is WS an
important weapon, or does anyone really care?

                                        Jeff

 
 
 

women's sabre

Post by e_mo » Tue, 06 Apr 1993 10:42:50

Quote:

>   Women's sabre has just been sanctioned by the Canadian Fencing Federation
> this year. Altho it has been fenced regularly on the eastern varsity
> ciruit in Canada, it has attracted little attention in regular competitive
> circles. All the women on the National rankings in sabre are from the
> East (Ont, Que, The Maritimes). In the West only one province - Saskatchewan
> offers it at tournaments, and even here it has only been run once, and then
> there weren't enough entries to make it worth points (min. 6 entries to
> be a points-gathering tournament).

>   I'm very interested in hearing what sort of experience others have had
> with Women's Sabre. To the best of my knowledge it is not yet FIE sanctioned.
> My coach just shrugs and says "if it isn't an Olympic weapon what's the point
> and points to declining numbers of women in epee as being far more important
> than trying to encourage Women's Sabre. What do other people think? Is WS an
> important weapon, or does anyone really care?

>                                         Jeff

Well I don't know how you'd define "important".  Interest in WS will
naturally pick up over time, and soon one will wonder how it ever came
that people were reluctant to homologate Women's Sabre....

Women's Epee is slated for 1996 Atlanta...a very good sign indeed!

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+    Ed Mou                                                         +

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 
 
 

women's sabre

Post by Morgan Bur » Thu, 08 Apr 1993 09:32:49

|>   Women's sabre has just been sanctioned by the Canadian Fencing Federation
|> this year. Altho it has been fenced regularly on the eastern varsity
|> ciruit in Canada, it has attracted little attention in regular competitive
|> circles. All the women on the National rankings in sabre are from the
|> East (Ont, Que, The Maritimes). In the West only one province - Saskatchewan -
|> offers it at tournaments, and even here it has only been run once, and then
|> there weren't enough entries to make it worth points (min. 6 entries to
|> be a points-gathering tournament).

Women's Sabre was held at this year's Stephen Lazar tournament in Vancouver,
February 28.  It attracted 7 entrants, and was dominated by a contingent
of American fencers from Washington and Oregon, who have been fencing women's
sabre for a couple of years, now.

|>   I'm very interested in hearing what sort of experience others have had
|> with Women's Sabre. To the best of my knowledge it is not yet FIE sanctioned.
|> My coach just shrugs and says "if it isn't an Olympic weapon what's the point?"
|> and points to declining numbers of women in epee as being far more important
|> than trying to encourage Women's Sabre. What do other people think? Is WS an
|> important weapon, or does anyone really care?
|>
|>                                         Jeff

One of my female club mates has entered a couple of sabre competitions now,
and she seems to love it.  At the Lazar, I bumped into her at one point,
and she was wild-eyed, half-crazed, shaking, and bleeding profusely from a
gash on her hand.  "Fencing sabre, are we?" I asked.  She nodded like
a mad-woman, grinned insanely, and said "I can't believe how much fun it is!"

And that, after all, is the main point of fencing, despite your coach's
earnest opinions.

-- Morgan Burke


 
 
 

women's sabre

Post by Tara Harm » Fri, 09 Apr 1993 05:54:20

Quote:

>  I'm very interested in hearing what sort of experience others have had
>with Women's Sabre. To the best of my knowledge it is not yet FIE sanctioned.
>My coach just shrugs and says "if it isn't an Olympic weapon what's the point?"
>and points to declining numbers of women in epee as being far more important
>than trying to encourage Women's Sabre. What do other people think? Is WS an
>important weapon, or does anyone really care?

>                                        Jeff

I think that Women's Sabre is a worthwhile weapon, and should be
encouraged.  Currently at the collegiate level, in New England,
anyway, there is no Women's sabre, but there are a few women who
fence sabre.  When i go to competitions with my team, i fence
Men's sabre.

-tara

 
 
 

women's sabre

Post by obrie.. » Fri, 09 Apr 1993 21:27:21


Quote:

>One of my female club mates has entered a couple of sabre competitions now,
>and she seems to love it.  At the Lazar, I bumped into her at one point,
>and she was wild-eyed, half-crazed, shaking, and bleeding profusely from a
>gash on her hand.  "Fencing sabre, are we?" I asked.  She nodded like
>a mad-woman, grinned insanely, and said "I can't believe how much fun it is!"

>And that, after all, is the main point of fencing, despite your coach's
>earnest opinions.

>-- Morgan Burke


No, the main point of fencing is to hit your opponent five times
before he can hit you five times! Fun? FUN?! Sir, you must be
joking, certainly!

I had the pleasure of meeting some of the Eastern Canadian
Sabrettes last year at Nationals, and to watch the WS event.
They told me that sabre was fenced mixed on the varsity circuit.
Alex Jeffries, who coaches at the Beaches Sabre Club is a gung-ho
supporter of women in the sport, but I have met many men (esp
sabreurs) who almost sneer at the very thought of women fencing
their sacred, manly weapon. Sad.

The WS final at Nationals was fenced on the raised piste in
front of the bleachers and attracted quite a crowd. I watched
in the company of several sabreurs, who winced most convincingly
at every hit. Women who fence sabre apparently have a reputation
for heavy hitting which was certainly lent credence to by the
meaty "thwacks!" that echoed through the gym during that bout.
MInd you, Jeffries was the coach of one of the women and he
teaches a very heavy style.

We are hosting a small tournament in Regina next month which
I swear I'm going to get 6 entries in WS for if I have to start
pulling hair to do it! I've got three women who have been working
hard at sabre all year and I would very much like to give them
a chance to rack up a few points.

                                Jeff O'Brien

 
 
 

women's sabre

Post by Edwin Wis » Sat, 10 Apr 1993 05:21:12

Quote:

>One of my female club mates has entered a couple of sabre competitions now,
>and she seems to love it.  At the Lazar, I bumped into her at one point,
>and she was wild-eyed, half-crazed, shaking, and bleeding profusely from a
>gash on her hand.  "Fencing sabre, are we?" I asked.  She nodded like
>a mad-woman, grinned insanely, and said "I can't believe how much fun it is!"

Ha! Definitely my kind of woman. Over the last years sabre fencing women
have made their appearance at the tournaments. I must admit I thought
little of it in the begining but now the gained experience is starting
to show. I've seen a few girls fence quite well, when fencing against a
girl one can't afford to be a gentleman anymore, the're out to get you :-)

There's even a girl at out club who has turned to sabre, we (the male
sabre fencers) are training with her a lot and she has already learned
not to say "sorry" anymore after giving a "convincing" riposte :-)

Maybe it needs a little time before the international tournaments start
with women's sabre. But I'm sure it will come.
--
_________________________                                  ___      

                                                           ___ | | |

 
 
 

women's sabre

Post by Morgan Bur » Sat, 10 Apr 1993 09:48:49

|> Alex Jeffries, who coaches at the Beaches Sabre Club is a gung-ho
|> supporter of women in the sport, but I have met many men (esp
|> sabreurs) who almost sneer at the very thought of women fencing
|> their sacred, manly weapon. Sad.

I've heard of old world coaches who not only refused to teach sabre
to women, but would even leave the room if a woman dared to pick one
up on her own.

Perhaps there was some chivalrous notion that sabre was too mean for
"ladies", but I unapologetically observe that the meanest fencers I've
had the pleasure of meeting have been women.  One of them was a former
clubmate who was an accomplished foil fencer and had the perfect build
and aptitude for sabre fencing.  (I will never forget a foil bout between
her and a Washington state fencer, in which numerous well-deserved warnings
were given out on both sides for "Disobedience" and "Brutality".  Shudder.)  
She often told me that she'd love to fence sabre if she could.  Sadly (for
her, anyway :-} ), she doesn't fence anymore.

-- Morgan Burke

 
 
 

women's sabre

Post by Deborah J. Schlut » Mon, 12 Apr 1993 03:30:11

~p
re: Women's saber,

In VA there are several women's saber fencers.  At state
championships last weekend there were at least six women saberists.
Several of these fencers practice and fence saber all season, and
are very good, often placing in the finals in open, mixed
tournaments.  There will be women's saber at nationals this June in
Florida.

 
 
 

women's sabre

Post by obrie.. » Tue, 13 Apr 1993 21:07:35


Quote:

>~p
>re: Women's saber,

>In VA there are several women's saber fencers.  At state
>championships last weekend there were at least six women saberists.
>Several of these fencers practice and fence saber all season, and
>are very good, often placing in the finals in open, mixed
>tournaments.  There will be women's saber at nationals this June in
>Florida.

   Perhaps if we ran mixed sabre events we would have more female
sabreurs (sabrettes?). While several of us have suggested that for
both sabre and epee events at local tournaments be fenced mixed
(with results separated for scoring purposes) the Powers That Be
keep saying "The *event* is Men's Sabre (or epee) and therefore
only *men* may fence in it." I find this attitude a little foolish,
given that both Women's and Men's sabre and epee events are woefully
under-attended here in Saskatchewan. Combining them (with the agree-
ment of the fencers involved) and scoring them separately as two
events would give everyone more piste experience and more
experience fencing different people. How can we not benefit?

   We have had Women's Sabre at Nationals for the last 2-3 years,
but this year will be the first time it will be an "official"
event and not just a demonstrator.

                                        Jeff O'Brien

 
 
 

women's sabre

Post by Randy M Brun » Wed, 14 Apr 1993 17:37:15

Excerpts from netnews.rec.sport.fencing: 12-Apr-93 RE: women's sabre by

Quote:
>   Perhaps if we ran mixed sabre events we would have more female
>sabreurs (sabrettes?). While several of us have suggested that for
>both sabre and epee events at local tournaments be fenced mixed
>(with results separated for scoring purposes) the Powers That Be
>keep saying "The *event* is Men's Sabre (or epee) and therefore
>only *men* may fence in it." I find this attitude a little foolish,
>given that both Women's and Men's sabre and epee events are woefully
>under-attended here in Saskatchewan. Combining them (with the agree-
>ment of the fencers involved) and scoring them separately as two
>events would give everyone more piste experience and more
>experience fencing different people. How can we not benefit?

Here in Pittsburgh, our Epee and Sabre events are always mixed except
for qualifying tournaments. Qualifiers (ie: for sectionals and
nationals) are the only times when it's absolutely necessary to
segregate men and women. Other than for these times, your bout
committees' number one priority should be running good tournaments...
which means combining men and women when you just don't have enough
women (or men for that matter).
 
 
 

women's sabre

Post by Ian Metz » Thu, 15 Apr 1993 09:14:38


Quote:
>Excerpts from netnews.rec.sport.fencing: 12-Apr-93 RE: women's sabre by

>>   Perhaps if we ran mixed sabre events we would have more female
>>sabreurs (sabrettes?). While several of us have suggested that for
>>both sabre and epee events at local tournaments be fenced mixed
>>(with results separated for scoring purposes) the Powers That Be
>>keep saying "The *event* is Men's Sabre (or epee) and therefore
>>only *men* may fence in it." I find this attitude a little foolish,
>>given that both Women's and Men's sabre and epee events are woefully
>>under-attended here in Saskatchewan. Combining them (with the agree-
>>ment of the fencers involved) and scoring them separately as two
>>events would give everyone more piste experience and more
>>experience fencing different people. How can we not benefit?
>Here in Pittsburgh, our Epee and Sabre events are always mixed except
>for qualifying tournaments. Qualifiers (ie: for sectionals and
>nationals) are the only times when it's absolutely necessary to
>segregate men and women. Other than for these times, your bout
>committees' number one priority should be running good tournaments...
>which means combining men and women when you just don't have enough
>women (or men for that matter).

It also is a good idea when in Australia the top women fencers don't bother
turning up to local tournaments, because there are not enough good fencers
there, ( ie about 3 ) and it is cheaper (time wise + money wise ) just to
turn up to a training night and fence the guys, ( as well as the girls )
also as these girls are pretty damned good, I ( and other men ) would be
more than happy to let them enter as it increases the strength of the tournament.
however due to ADMINISTRATORS, who are out of date, and never could fence in
their day, they have to compete in the womens events. Has anyone ever noticed
that most of the people who are sticklers for the rules, are old fencers who
never got anywhere?.

        Ian

 
 
 

women's sabre

Post by obrie.. » Thu, 15 Apr 1993 20:51:45


Quote:
>however due to ADMINISTRATORS, who are out of date, and never could fence in
>their day, they have to compete in the womens events. Has anyone ever noticed
>that most of the people who are sticklers for the rules, are old fencers who
>never got anywhere?.

>    Ian

  Bravo! Good answer! Not completely true, of course, but a
damn fine sentiment nonetheless!

                                Jeff

 
 
 

women's sabre

Post by Randy M Brun » Fri, 16 Apr 1993 12:21:18

Excerpts from netnews.rec.sport.fencing: 14-Apr-93 Re: women's sabre by

Quote:
>It also is a good idea when in Australia the top women fencers don't bother
>turning up to local tournaments, because there are not enough good fencers
>there, ( ie about 3 ) and it is cheaper (time wise + money wise ) just to
>turn up to a training night and fence the guys, ( as well as the girls )
>also as these girls are pretty damned good, I ( and other men ) would be
>more than happy to let them enter as it increases the strength of the
>tournament.
>however due to ADMINISTRATORS, who are out of date, and never could fence in
>their day, they have to compete in the womens events. Has anyone ever
>noticed that most of the people who are sticklers for the rules, are old
>fencers who never got anywhere?.

YES. We have one or two such people here.
 
 
 

women's sabre

Post by Bruce Pricke » Sun, 18 Apr 1993 00:56:41

I started out in saber, and my first sparring partner was a tall, left-handed
woman (Audrey Gowan). You can bet I learned to make my quarte parry WIDE,
at least when I was fencing her :-)

Bruce ***ett

        ^^^^ the machine name is a little embarrassing, since I haven't touched
             one in years :-)