leon paul epee blades...any comments?

leon paul epee blades...any comments?

Post by ECCL » Wed, 24 Aug 1994 04:06:05


im shopping for a new elect. epee...heard of the new LP blades...are they
worth
the 3x cost over chinese? any experience or comments appreciated!
 
 
 

leon paul epee blades...any comments?

Post by Jessie Mical » Thu, 25 Aug 1994 22:03:24

Quote:

>writes:
>>>>im shopping for a new elect. epee...heard of the new LP blades...are
>they
>>>>worth the 3x cost over chinese? any experience or comments appreciated!
>I have three of the new Leon Paul "sheet metal" blades.  I think they are
>great.  They are much springier than other blades.  They stay straight,
>flex when you hit, and spring right back in place.  So far they look like
>they will have a very long life.  The only thing unusual is that the wire
>comes out on the bottom, not the top, so if you are installing them in an
>old guard/grip, you will have to file some new channels for the wires.
>     -Jeff Boone, Parkway Fencing, St. Louis

I bought one of these blades and didn't care for it very much.  I had it
mounted in a very light aluminum bellguard (Allstar) so the weapon was very
light and manuverable.  The problem was that when someone took the blade
strongly, they were able to control it very easily since there was no
weight behind it.  This caused me to overly tense my arm, and I
ended up aggrevating an old case of tennis elbow.  This may not be a
problem for someone with a stronger arm (I'm a 5'4" woman usually fencing
incredibly large men!).  The blade also reverberated alot with beat
attacks/parries which I found very distracting.  I have since retired this
weapon and gone back to more conventional blades.  

So Jeff - how would you like to buy one, all wired up?  I'll be at
Remenyik.    

Jessie A. Micales

U.S. Forest Products Laboratory
Durendal Fencing Club

 
 
 

leon paul epee blades...any comments?

Post by Tom Buchan » Thu, 25 Aug 1994 19:40:28


Quote:

>im shopping for a new elect. epee...heard of the new LP blades...are they
>worth
>the 3x cost over chinese? any experience or comments appreciated!

The paul blades are, IMHO, excellent, if you like their rather unique feel.
Light and flexible, and very durable (after over a year of use, the two I
have are still in excellent condition). I would recommend them (depending on
the price where you are - I wouldn't pay over 30UK for one, if they are
expensive in the states you may be better off going for a higher quality (eg
allstar) blade).

Tom.

 
 
 

leon paul epee blades...any comments?

Post by Gregory J All » Fri, 26 Aug 1994 18:24:04



   >writes:
   >>>>im shopping for a new elect. epee...heard of the new LP blades...are
   >they
   >>>>worth the 3x cost over chinese? any experience or comments appreciated!

   >          They are much springier than other blades.  They stay straight,
   >flex when you hit, and spring right back in place.  So far they look like
   >they will have a very long life.
   >     -Jeff Boone, Parkway Fencing, St. Louis

[edited] I bought  one  of these blades   and didn't care for it  very
   much.  The problem was that when  someone took the blade, they were
   able to control it very easily since there was no weight behind it.
   This caused me to overly  tense my arm,  and I ended up aggrevating
   an old case of tennis elbow.  This may not be a problem for someone
   with a stronger  arm (I'm a  5'4" woman  usually fencing incredibly
   large   men!).    The  blade  also   reverberated  alot  with  beat
   attacks/parries which I  found   very distracting.  I   have  since
   retired this weapon and gone back to more conventional blades.

   Jessie A. Micales

   U.S. Forest Products Laboratory
   Durendal Fencing Club

I found this too at first, after a while though you can get used to it though,
and "know" where the point is all the time. Also, if you buy maraging, you can
specify the flexibility of the blade (numbered between 40 to 60 according to
the heat treatment used in manufacture). I've never found the having the
blade bashed out the way a problem - ideally of course, if you can completely
avoid tensing on the beat, I find you can stop hit off the beat into all but
the opponent with perfect timing and distance.

Greg.

 
 
 

leon paul epee blades...any comments?

Post by Dick Ki » Sat, 27 Aug 1994 01:54:11

|> im shopping for a new elect. epee...heard of the new LP blades...are they
|> worth
|> the 3x cost over chinese? any experience or comments appreciated!

Most blades start life as a steel rod.  They are then forged, and the groove is
ground or cut out.  Leon Paul blades start life as a piece of sheet metal
that's bent into a V shape, and the tang is brazed on.  The wire comes out the
_bottom_ of the blade.

1: I really hate the Chinese blades.

     - they're metallurgically bad

       This makes the obvious problem that the blades stay bent after a hit and
       need to be restraightened, but also a more subtle problem.  The barrel
       is held on by friction in the threads, and this is in turn the result of
       the taper in the threads compressing the tip a little bit.  Recall that
       there is a slot in the threads that hold the barrel on.  If you wire
       your own blades you must have noticed that the wire slides through the
       groove more easily when the barrel is loose on the threads than when the
       barrel is tightened down.

       If the blade is metallurgically inferior you will deform it more when
       you tighten it enough to make the barrel not fall off immediately, and
       you will be closer to hysteresis limits.  That means that every time you
       stress the threaded joint, such as by getting blocked by Nefarious
       Opponent's immense bellguard or blasting him in the mask, you run the
       risk of making the barrel compress the threads a little bit,
       permanently.  Unlike a bent blade there's no way to undo this
       distortion.

     - A couple of the guys tried one on price.  So far i haven't seen anyone
       try a second.  With the Russian blades, sometimes they do.

2: A blade that costs 1/3 as much and lasts half as long is NOT the bargain.

     - There are fixed per-blade costs: wiring*, transportation [if not bought
       locally].

     - I, for one, get a bit shaken up when my blade breaks at a tournament.  I
       treat the successor like a glass rod for a couple of touches.  Make all
       the depracatory comments you want, but i doubt you can honestly say you
       don't suffer from that at least a tad.

     - The successor doesn't balance or aim quite identically to the original.

3: The blades have a good feel to them.

     - They're light.

     - They flick reasonably well, and accurately.

4: The blades are relatively uniform.  There's little hand work, i understand.

     - This makes it safer to buy them mail order

     - This also means that when you must switch blades in a tournament your
       accuracy will not suffer quite as much.

5: Their failure mode is benign

     - I've been using them for about a year now.  The first one broke after
       about 10 months of service, which is good for me [i play a lot, and i'm
       a bit *** them].  It didn't really break, however.  It _folded_ into
       a 30 degree angle [that's an _acute_ angle].  When i tried to straighten
       it out it broke in my hand.  Nobody was ever endangered.

       I can't claim that they all break like that.  This is the only one i've
       ever seen break.

6: Sometimes the tang groove is not deep enough, and the bellguard notch is not
   high enough.  There's failure possibilities here.  You can prevent such
   failures by making the hole bigger and pushing the spaghetti through, but
   this creates a spot at the apex that will register a touch.  The referee
   should not annul such touches.

   On the Leon Paul blade the hole is big enough to hold spaghetti, but it's a
   tunnel so it doesn't create a hittable point.

7: If you _do_ decide to use a Leon Paul blade you must file a second notch in
   your bellguard hole, and a second groove in your grip.

-dk