Sick of the flick?

Sick of the flick?

Post by cjg61 » Wed, 18 May 1994 04:40:37


I've seen a number of postings where foilists complain about the flick
being given right-of-way even tho' the attacker has his/her arm "way back
there.

First, even the best flickmeisters will tell you that it is NOT
unbeatable. I am fortunate enough to fence with these people (Longenbach,
Devine, Carlay, Bayer, etc) and they do the flick for one reason: IT
WORKS.(In America, that is...)

Why does it work? Because for one thing, they really DO have the right of
way. By the time you notice the prep, their hand is already coming
forward. You're too late.

Further, when most people see the flick coming, their footwork goes to
hell. Take the proper distance, and a 3 or 6 parry closes that line
perfectly.

Finally, the national-level guys do not do the flick as it is seen out in
the sticks. The hand does NOT come back with the elbow "pointing out." If
someone is dumb enough to prepare this way, sucker them into it, double
the tempo with two quick advances, and STEP IN to the flick. They will
not be able to get their hand over their head and land a touch in time.
Granted, if you are not light on your feet, you might be risking
corp-a-corps, but stepping IN to a poorly-prepared flick is VERY effective.

One last thing:
The flick works in the USA because American fencers are, well, pathetic
when it comes to fundamentals. (Self included.) Any clown that buys a
black fencing jacket calls themself a "master." Go to Racing Club in
Paris, or what's left of Dynamo in Moscow, or any "A" cup in Europe: you
won't see the flick. Try it on Omnes or just about any Russian over the
age of 15 and you're dead meat.

Wanna beat the flick? Timing, speed and distance. Forget the tricks.

Charles Glasser
New York Fencer's Club

 
 
 

Sick of the flick?

Post by Bill Oliv » Thu, 19 May 1994 08:37:36

The only REALLY great flick that I've seen was in the Team Foil at the '89 Worlds in Denver.  Romankov was fencing one of the Germans (I forget who) and the German getting all the breaks from the director.

Romankov started out with a little thrust in high line, from very close distance (the only distance he kept during the competition).  When the German went for the blade, Romankov pulled his hand down to waist level and flicked the German from below.  Just like that, no e***ment, no screaming, just pump, flick, return to on guard.

That was the only flick I saw from the Russian team during the tournament.
--  
   Bill Oliver
   United States Fencing Association
   Fencing Official's Commission  


 
 
 

Sick of the flick?

Post by G.J. All » Thu, 19 May 1994 11:05:29

|>
|> I've seen a number of postings where foilists complain about the flick
|> being given right-of-way even tho' the attacker has his/her arm "way back
|> there.
.
. (snip)
.
|> ... but stepping IN to a poorly-prepared flick is VERY effective.
Very very true - especially against younger fencers who've just "learnt"
to flick, had much success with it against our their age, and then you
come along and just counter-attack every time! (PS I'm an epeeist really)

The new Leon Paul epee blades are great for flick hits too. You can get
very flexible ones, and if you are buying maraging, you can specify the
flexibility you want. Best is feint-flick high to hand, drawing a straight
arm from your opponent, then flick underneath their wrist. Here, like all the
best flicks, the way your hand moves naturally results in a flick - there's
none of this drawing your hand back nonsense.

Good example in foil:
Left hander (me) against right hander.
Engage sixte, almost like a pris-de-fer, straightening arm AT THE SAME TIME,
(hopefully I still have their blade at this point
hand slightly higher than normal, blade nearly at 45 degrees to horiz. Finish
by flicking point downwards onto their near shoulder using fingers & wrist
movement. This works well as a parry too, retreat under attack, then stop
and do the above. Or use it to attack on preparation.
Warning: you must have v.good control of distance!

|>
|> One last thing:
|> The flick works in the USA because American fencers are, well, pathetic
|> when it comes to fundamentals. (Self included.) Any clown that buys a
|> black fencing jacket calls themself a "master." Go to Racing Club in
|> Paris, or what's left of Dynamo in Moscow, or any "A" cup in Europe: you
|> won't see the flick. Try it on Omnes or just about any Russian over the
|> age of 15 and you're dead meat.
Very likely true, but I bet they'll hit you with lots of flicks

|>
|> Wanna beat the flick? Timing, speed and distance. Forget the tricks.
|>
|> Charles Glasser
|> New York Fencer's Club
|>

Have a look at last years World championships, or watch this year's (it was on
EuroSport last year). Lots of flick hits there and about 50% of them worked.
The important thing is how the flick is done though - ideally the hand moves
forward, arm straightening until the last moment, and by stopping suddenly the
point continues on, producing the flick.

Greg Allen
Captain of Fencing, Cambridge University Fencing Club.

 
 
 

Sick of the flick?

Post by David Air » Thu, 19 May 1994 20:57:49


: |>
: |> I've seen a number of postings where foilists complain about the flick
: |> being given right-of-way even tho' the attacker has his/her arm "way back
: |> there.
: .
: . (snip)
: .
: |> ... but stepping IN to a poorly-prepared flick is VERY effective.
: Very very true - especially against younger fencers who've just "learnt"
: to flick, had much success with it against our their age, and then you
: come along and just counter-attack every time! (PS I'm an epeeist really)

I had a bout like this is Sydnay recently.  Opponent was determined to hit
me with a flick to the back.  The sequence was repeated: He pulled his point
back, I stepped forward, he missed, I hit, he walk beck to en garde checking
his tip.  At about 13 -3 he landed one .. and was sooo pleased!

: The new Leon Paul epee blades are great for flick hits too. You can get
: very flexible ones, and if you are buying maraging, you can specify the
: flexibility you want. Best is feint-flick high to hand, drawing a straight
: arm from your opponent, then flick underneath their wrist. Here, like all the
: best flicks, the way your hand moves naturally results in a flick - there's
: none of this drawing your hand back nonsense.

I've alway thought/found the flick to be more effective as a riposte than an
attack.

: EuroSport last year). Lots of flick hits there and about 50% of them worked.
: The important thing is how the flick is done though - ideally the hand moves
: forward, arm straightening until the last moment, and by stopping suddenly the
: point continues on, producing the flick.

: Greg Allen
: Captain of Fencing, Cambridge University Fencing Club.

DAVID.

 
 
 

Sick of the flick?

Post by Susan Mullhau » Thu, 19 May 1994 23:59:50

        [...]

Quote:
>Wanna beat the flick? Timing, speed and distance. Forget the tricks.
>Charles Glasser

I just wanted to say that I completely agree with every word of your
excellent posting. Now that has to be a first...

Later,
Andrew Mullhaupt

 
 
 

Sick of the flick?

Post by Mary Ellen Curti » Fri, 20 May 1994 15:11:43

Quote:


>    [...]

>>Wanna beat the flick? Timing, speed and distance. Forget the tricks.

>>Charles Glasser

>I just wanted to say that I completely agree with every word of your
>excellent posting. Now that has to be a first...

Me, too.  There's another first for you.

Dirk Goldgar

postal:    9 Titus Mill Rd., Pennington, NJ 08534,  USA