Rules question: setting from above net height

Rules question: setting from above net height

Post by Timothy E. Vaugh » Wed, 25 Dec 1991 03:06:46


I have a question about Commentary (7f) on Rule 8 [1992 USVBA Rules],
which states, "If a player near the net sets the ball from above the
height of the net in such a manner that the ball is blocked back into
that player, such contact by that player is considered to be a block."

I think I understand the phrasing, but I just don't see how this
situation can arise.  If the player sets his teammate, the shot can't
be blocked because it is above his own playing area.  If the player is
attacking, and is above the height of the net, he is PROBABLY spiking,
not setting!

I guess what I am asking is the following:  Would this commentary be
improved by replacing the word "sets" with "attacks," or am I missing
something important in my interpretation?

Tim

 
 
 

Rules question: setting from above net height

Post by Eric Wa » Wed, 25 Dec 1991 06:45:49


Quote:
>I have a question about Commentary (7f) on Rule 8 [1992 USVBA Rules],
>which states, "If a player near the net sets the ball from above the
>height of the net in such a manner that the ball is blocked back into
>that player, such contact by that player is considered to be a block."
>... I just don't see how this situation can arise.  If the player sets
>his teammate, the shot can't be blocked because it is above his own
>playing area.

    Read "near the net" as "ball straddling the net", i.e. the ball has
    broken the vertical plane of the net (an overpass), and is legally
    attackable by both sides.  Good setters can bring such balls back
    towards their own attack lines to let their outside hitters get
    decent swings.  However, smart opposing blockers can also spike such
    balls.  If the setter is back row and the ball is blocked (or
    spiked) into the setter's hands or arms in such a situation, the
    setter has committed a back-row blocker violation.  This rule
    doesn't get invoked often, but I've seen it called in the NCAA
    several times this year alone.

Eric Wang


 
 
 

Rules question: setting from above net height

Post by The VolleyDog - E » Wed, 25 Dec 1991 06:51:26



|>
|> I have a question about Commentary (7f) on Rule 8 [1992 USVBA Rules],
|> which states, "If a player near the net sets the ball from above the
|> height of the net in such a manner that the ball is blocked back into
|> that player, such contact by that player is considered to be a block."
|>
|> I think I understand the phrasing, but I just don't see how this
|> situation can arise.  If the player sets his teammate, the shot can't
|> be blocked because it is above his own playing area.  If the player is
|> attacking, and is above the height of the net, he is PROBABLY spiking,
|> not setting!
|>

The situation is this,  the ball can be set to a teammate.  If the ball enters
the plane of the net, the opposition can legally block the ball.

|> I guess what I am asking is the following:  Would this commentary be
|> improved by replacing the word "sets" with "attacks," or am I missing
|> something important in my interpretation?
|>
|> Tim

It is the situation when the ball is in the plane, and I think that
"set" is still
appropriate.

Bob Hott
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