setting

setting

Post by Richard Pottor » Wed, 26 May 1993 02:53:10


I occasionally have the need to make a one handed set. I use the same hand
shape and arm motion that I use for down balls, except I try to hit the ball
up, and parallel to the net. (I'm a high IVL B-2, low IVL B-1 player).

I have a question. I like to play setter (tho I'm a bit taller and stronger
than the average setter), esp. when I'm playing with a group where no one
will serve to me because my passes to the setter are much better than the
my team-mates (seems to happen a lot in open gym play). I also play setter
when I don't feel I'm getting a good enough workout as a middle blocker.

I generally make the easy set, a high outside set, but once in a while I'll
set the middle, and now and again the opposite hitter.  I try to hold my
hands the same way for all my sets (line up the ball, my hands, and forehead),
and set the ball to outside, middle, opposite from there.

Almost all of the opposite hitters are never ready to hit my back sets, which
everyone tells me are clean, and good. I'm not arching my back when I
back-set, so that may be a flaw in my technique, but if I arch my back, I'm
telegraphing my set to the opposing blockers. (As I'm not arching my back,
I'm essentially setting blind, as I can't see the ball once my hands are
past my ears).

I know that at the level I'm playing at, that's not a big deal, but I have
fantasies of playing at a higher level (yeah, sure). Should I be arching
my back for a back set, a middle set, an outside set, or should I try to
set all three basic sets from the same basic posture?

Appreciate any and all constructive comments.

Ramblin'
--
Stolen signature:
GILLETTE'S PRINCIPLE:
  "If you want to make people angry, lie. If you want to make
   them absolutely livid with rage, tell the truth."

 
 
 

setting

Post by Spankin' Ed Davi » Wed, 26 May 1993 03:49:40


Quote:

>I know that at the level I'm playing at, that's not a big deal, but I
have
>fantasies of playing at a higher level (yeah, sure). Should I be arching
>my back for a back set, a middle set, an outside set, or should I try to
>set all three basic sets from the same basic posture?

If you do it right, the opposing blockers shouldn't be able to tell
which way the set is going until the ball leaves your hands.  So
basically what I am trying to say is that all sets should come from
the same posture.  If you arch your back on back sets you'll find that
your back side hitter will be facing a lot of strong double/triple
blocks.  
As a setter, one of my favorite things to hear is the middle blocker
saying "Oh Shit!!??" when I pop out a sweet unexpected back set.  Also
as a setter you will learn to see the blockers cheating one way or
another, so use this to your advantage.
For similar reasons, it is very difficult to be deceptive and very
accurate when trying to side set.  A side setter almost always
telegraphs his direction by dropping one shoulder.  Avoid Side-setting.

Spankin'  Ed                

        "Volleyball Is My Life"
            Thomas Aquinas
                       1263

   The spirit of TerpZilla lives.


    <Goddard Space Flight Center>

 
 
 

setting

Post by Daryl Odne » Wed, 26 May 1993 04:00:00

: I know that at the level I'm playing at, that's not a big deal, but I have
: fantasies of playing at a higher level (yeah, sure). Should I be arching
: my back for a back set, a middle set, an outside set, or should I try to
: set all three basic sets from the same basic posture?

It sound to me that you don't have a problem... your opposite hitters
have a problem.  The only suggestion that I can make is that you
remind your OH by signaling or talking to him/her just before the serve
to remind them that they may be the recipient of a back set.

A lot of beginning and intermediate level players are not used to
playing with a skilled setter who can back set.  If you remind
them to be alert and ready before hand, it is not your fault if
they blow it.

I have been taught that you are supposed to arch your back for a back
set, but if you can back set cleanly without telegraphing your set
direction, keep doing it!  Ususally, I do arch my back for back sets,
but I try to wait until just before the ball arrives so I do not give
the opposing blocker too much advanced notice.

Daryl Odnert
Hewlett-Packard
Cupertino, CA

 
 
 

setting

Post by Ben Chua » Thu, 27 May 1993 02:52:50

: Almost all of the opposite hitters are never ready to hit my back sets, which
: everyone tells me are clean, and good. I'm not arching my back when I
: back-set, so that may be a flaw in my technique, but if I arch my back, I'm
: telegraphing my set to the opposing blockers. (As I'm not arching my back,
: I'm essentially setting blind, as I can't see the ball once my hands are
: past my ears).

I used to arch my back to backset, and I push forward to front set.
Now I've learned to be able to back set with my back rigid and front
set with my back arched, so I arch my back more to adjust to balls
than to determine where I will set.

I rarely play with middle blockers that read the setter (rather
than read block the set) so I don't work on my deception much.
I have found that you can usually "train" people that read
setters (but aren't that good). Back set twice, but arch
your back a big deal. If the blocker follows, then arch you back and set
forward. Some people bite this fake really bad.

_______________________________________________________________
Benjamin S. Chuang/ITD-CSS Consultant/University of Michigan:A2




_______________________________________________________________

 
 
 

setting

Post by feh.. » Thu, 27 May 1993 23:51:22

      .... some stuff deleted here

Quote:
> I know that at the level I'm playing at, that's not a big deal, but I have
> fantasies of playing at a higher level (yeah, sure). Should I be arching
> my back for a back set, a middle set, an outside set, or should I try to
> set all three basic sets from the same basic posture?

      I was taught at volleyball camp to get your hands in the proper
position above your head; so you're looking through them to the ball.
At the same time you contact the ball you step forward under the ball
so that when you release the ball your hands are above or slightly
behind your head.  Arching the back prior to contact will make it hard
to watch the blockers, and the hitters approaches which in turn makes
it difficult to set accurately.  And yes, the opponents will read your
intentions.

--Eric