Setting

Setting

Post by sta.. » Tue, 05 Nov 1991 10:44:35


Sorry if this has been discussed before, but I've been away for a while.

I want to start making a move on being the setter for my team..can anyone post
me some good setting drills that will improve my accuracy and appropriate
muscles in my arms/shoulders etc.

Thanx in advance

Antony

 
 
 

Setting

Post by william.l.milli » Thu, 07 Nov 1991 09:25:06

We've had some differences of opinion here on the setting calls;
who should call the sets, and all that.  Here's a list of questions
I've got for the net - hope somebody can answer a few:

1) hitters call their sets; setter realizes that the middle is a
6'8" mutant, and can whip a 1 set (just above the net in the middle)
and it's a guaranteed kill - does the setter have the right to tell
the hitter to run a 1?  I mean, it's *the hitter's* ball, but the
setter is supposed to run the show, right?

2) Player puts both hands behind his back - top hand says 2, bottom
hand says 4.  What am I supposed to do with this?

3) How can setter tell players to run a 1/2 (middle goes up for a
one, outside hitter from hell goes up for a 2, and it's a guaranteed
kill, since the middle blocker is taken out by the fake jump) without
making it obvious to the other team?   Sure, a time-out, but...

Just to iron out a few things - here's the numbering system I'm
used to - is it the same as everybody else?

X-----------------------------X
  4     3     12   12       5
  LF          CF s         RF

 - - -a- - - -c- - - -b- - - -

1 - middle hit, goes up to middle hitter who should already be
    in air - ball just clears the net, maybe 1-2 feet above net,
    1-2 feet back from net

2 - middle hit, goes up maybe 1 meter/3 feet, middle hitter hits
    it on the way down

3 - ball goes halfway between middle and outside hitter's home
    spots - can be hit by either LF or CF  There are variations
    on this - 3S is a bit shorter, 3L is a bit longer

4 - high outside ball - meat on the hoof.

5 - high outside ball, to the off-hitter - same height as a 4.

shoot - can be done for 3, 3s, 3l, 4, and carefully for a 5.

a, b, c - back row hits - hit by the respective hitters in
    those positions.

Back 1, Back 2 - same as 1 and 2, but to the back of the setter
    these are usually hit by the RF, but the back 2 can be hit
    by the CF

J - This is a back-1, but hit by the middle hitter - he goes up
    into a basketball-type jump, with his body basically curving
    around the setter (looks like a 1 to the opposite middle
    blocker), but the ball goes behind the setter; hitter twists
    in mid-air, and hits the ball

U or R - CF/LF combination - one runs a 1, which fakes out the
    middle hitter, the other runs a 2.  After this has been
    run several times, the setter has a choice of setting a 1
    or a 2, since the middle blocker does not know which to
    jump for, and if he picks the wrong one, it's a sure kill.
    (Very funny to run this, and set a 5 - that outside blocker
    looks very lonely out there)

Other nice combinations:

1 and c - back row hitter basically has a nice open field, since
    the middle blocker jumped for hte middle hitter, and now is
    just going down

I dunno - I play with a deaf team - seems like we are able to
communicate a lot more before each volley about what we want
to do with the ball.  There's also the fact that the setter should
keep an eye on the middle hitter - when I was playing middle (I'm
6', but was one of the tallest on our team), I often would not
tell the setter what I was going to do - setter would have to
see if I was in the air, then give me a one; if not, give me a
two.  Non-verbal communication...

Bill

 
 
 

Setting

Post by Chengi Jimmy K » Thu, 07 Nov 1991 11:10:38

[who should call the sets]

You give a lot of options.  In my mind that's probably too many options.
Consider this:

Combine some of the sets into set plays.  For now, we'll say play number 1
is a fast one, play two is slow, you make up the rest.

For play one, middle hitter is going to hit a 1.  right hitter will be the
outlet (slow,high), left hitter has an option.  Setter shows that he'll run
play number 1, left hitter tells setter what he wants for his option.
(Play 3 could be the right hitter getting the option so you could run double
ones or the 1-2 option based on what the right hitter calls.)  Play 1 with
the left hitter calling a 2 is your example of a middle 1-2 option.

Play 2: middle hitter hitting 2.  Both side hitters have options.

Play X: It's an X.  Run an X middle.  Outside left has the emergency outlet.

So, setter calls a play "concept."  Within the concept, certain hitters have
options, others don't.

I've heard of one system where identical plays have the same numbers so you
can call the plays out loud, changing numbers without giving it away.

Jimmy Kuo
--

"The correct answer to an either/or question is both!"

 
 
 

Setting

Post by Eric Wa » Fri, 08 Nov 1991 07:36:56

Quote:

> We've had some differences of opinion here on the setting calls;
> who should call the sets, and all that.

This falls under the general heading of "team offense".  Every team does
it differently.  There are several different systems/schools of
thought/levels of difficulty that try to address the issue of delegating
the responsibility for deciding who's hitting what.  Here's a rough
spectrum of offensive systems, from lowest complexity (requiring little
team practice and coordination) to highest complexity (requiring a high
level of team coordination).

ASSUMPTIONS.  Nobody says anything (sigh).  Setter sets whatever he
  thinks will work.  Usually, this is a high outside set in whatever
  direction the setter is facing.  This is typical of pick-up volleyball
  between friends, where you play with whoever shows up.  There's
  usually no middle attack to speak of in such games.

RANDOM AUDIBLES.  Everybody calls (or signals) what they want.  It's up
  to the setter to figure out what to do.  This is a step up from
  ASSUMPTIONS, because now hitters can audible into simple combinations.
  However, it can go very wrong when hitters call for contradictory
  sets, or encroach upon other hitters' zones (especially when the
  middle hitter follows a bad set and wanders into the outside hitter's
  approach lane).  Sometimes a pick-up game can reach this level, but it
  requires hitters who can reliably hit what they call for, and setters
  who can set anything on a moment's notice.

SIMPLE PLAYS.  The team has practiced running a few simple combinations,
  e.g. X's and tandems, and has come up with names and/or hand signals
  to indicate them.  At this level, it's usually the setter who calls or
  signals these plays; this guarantees that the n > 1 hitters involved
  in the combination (1) get the same message and (2) don't contradict
  each other.

MEMORIZED PLAYBOOK.  The team has developed a fixed set of combinations,
  and has practiced all of them to achieve some degree of proficiency
  and smoothness.  The setter calls out or signals the play (e.g.
  "Eighty-five wing-Z!  Eighty-five wing-Z!  Hut hut HUT!"), and
  everybody runs it.  This is a lot like football.  It seems to be the
  lowest level of collegiate varsity offenses; any decently coached
  program should do at least this.

  The advantage of this system is its simplicity; it doesn't take long
  to learn such a system, and it's very easy to use during a rally.  The
  disadvantage is, of course, its inflexibility.  If an opportunity
  opens up during a rally, or there is a perpetual flaw in the defense
  that a hitter can exploit (such as a short blocker), but there's no
  play in the playbook that attacks that specific weakness, then this
  system cannot reliably take advantage of that weakness.  Also, this
  system places the burden of offensive thinking on the wrong person,
  namely the setter.  Contrary to football, in which the quarterback in
  the deep drop can look over the entire field and get the "big
  picture", a setter is usually watching the ball until after it is set.
  So not only does the setter not know where the opposing blockers and
  diggers are, he/she rarely knows where all of his or her *own* hitters
  are.  Thus, the setter in this system is faced with the unenviable
  task of selecting a plan of attack using uncertain resources against
  an unknown defense.

COMPLEMENTARY AUDIBLES.  The team has practiced together intensively.
  The hitters can reliably call and hit any of several play-sets.  (By
  "play-set", I mean a set that can be used as part of a combination.
  Examples are right-side hitter looping around for a front 32, a front
  1, or (for lefties) a front slide, or coming in for a back 1; middle
  blocker hitting a pump-fake 2, a 31 shoot, or a quick slide; left-side
  hitter coming in for a 32, etc.)  The hitters have also practiced
  combining the play-sets into full-fledged multiple-hitter
  combinations, and has developed several standard combinations with
  which they feel comfortable.  When attacking, the hitters call out the
  sets that they what, and the setter chooses one of them.  To guarantee
  that the calls are complementary, hitters are assigned different
  priorities based on their hitting prowess, with the primary hitter
  calling first, etc.

  This is the most advanced system, requiring a high degree of skill
  from the hitters and the setter, and much practice and coordination.
  Its power comes from its flexibility; hitters can look for local
  weaknesses and call for the sets that allow them to be exploited.

Most of this comes from women's volleyball.  The men's game is
different, because men are so damn strong that they can hit with
terminal velocity even when the sets are imperfect or way far off the
net, so the sets don't have to be quite as perfect and complex offenses
to beat the block are not nearly as necessary as in the women's game.
(This may change, though, as the Soviet Wall seems to have gone back
up.)

Quote:
>1) hitters call their sets; setter realizes that the middle is a
>6'8" mutant, and can whip a 1 set (just above the net in the middle)
>and it's a guaranteed kill - does the setter have the right to tell
>the hitter to run a 1?  I mean, it's *the hitter's* ball, but the
>setter is supposed to run the show, right?

  Depends on the level of play.  If your MB can crush 1's reliably and
  you don't feed him until he chokes, then something's seriously wrong
  with your team offense.  If *he* isn't calling for 1's every time,
  then something is seriously wrong with *him*.

Quote:
>2) Player puts both hands behind his back - top hand says 2, bottom
>hand says 4.  What am I supposed to do with this?

  I dunno -- first hit is a 2 in the middle, thereafter 4's outside?
  *Ask* your hitter what he means!  If you're the setter, make sure
  everybody is speaking *your* language.

Quote:
>3) How can setter tell players to run a 1/2 without making it obvious
>to the other team?

  If you're doing RANDOM AUDIBLES, you can't.  If you're running SIMPLE
  PLAYS or using a PLAYBOOK, make up a name or a signal for this play,
  and just call it.  If your hitters are making COMPLEMENTARY AUDIBLES,
  then *they* should figure out the coordination between themselves and
  inform the setter of the result.

  The bottom line is that team offense isn't something that can be
  worked out on the floor ("over the board", in chess terminology).  You
  have to have it figured out *before* the match or tournament begins.
  That's what practices are for.

Quote:
>J - This is a back-1, but hit by the middle hitter - he goes up
>    into a basketball-type jump, with his body basically curving
>    around the setter (looks like a 1 to the opposite middle
>    blocker), but the ball goes behind the setter; hitter twists
>    in mid-air, and hits the ball

  Also called a "quick slide", since it's a quick set using the slide
  approach.  The slide, or "basketball-type jump", is similar to the
  lay-up approach, i.e. a running jump off of one foot.  Think of
  Michael with the ball on the left side of the court about 5' from the
  baseline, closely defended by Rodman.  Michael fakes to the baseline,
  Rodman bites, Michael spins to his left and finds empty key ahead of
  him, but Laimbeer steps up from the low post to cut off Michael's
  direct route to the basket.  Not to be denied, Michael takes two big
  strides parallel to the baseline, takes the ball in his right hand,
  springs off of his left foot at the edge of the key, and sails through
  the air across the key, still on a path parallel to the baseline.  As
  he flashes past the undefended basket, Michael twists slightly and
  swings his right arm (and the ball) over his head and across his body,
  slamming the ball home for two.  Several hours later, Michael gently
  lands on the other edge of the key, still about 5' from the baseline.
  That's the back slide approach and swing.  Foul on Laimbeer.

  :-)  

  (BTW, the slide is common in the women's game, but rather infrequent
  in the men's game.  Men are so strong that they don't need the finesse
  of the slide to hit effectively.)

Eric Wang

 
 
 

Setting

Post by Van K. » Sat, 09 Nov 1991 05:13:42

Quote:

>3) How can setter tell players to run a 1/2 (middle goes up for a
>one, outside hitter from hell goes up for a 2, and it's a guaranteed
>kill, since the middle blocker is taken out by the fake jump) without
>making it obvious to the other team?   Sure, a time-out, but...

>Bill

You asked a lot of questions in that article and I think Jimmy and
Eric effectively answered them all.  For this question in particular,
my team uses hand signals for the simple middle plays.  We follow the
rule that the hitters call the plays and that they check with each
other before calling set plays.  Usually, the middle picks what he
wants to run and the others follow.
The 6 middle signals are as follows:
1) forefinger out: a 1
2) forefinger and middle and apart: 2
3) forefinger and thumb: back 1
4) forefinger, middle, thumb: back 2
5) forefinger and middle together and parallel: tandem (cf 1/lf 2)
6) forefinger and middle crossed: X (cf 1/lf front 2)

This is used for the higher level throw togethers and low level club
teams.  Really, only the setter, middle, and one hitter needs to know
the signals to play with them recreationally.

Van Vo
Washington University VBC

 
 
 

Setting

Post by Van K. » Sat, 09 Nov 1991 05:18:32

Can some of you guys post some play combinations that you have heard
of or run?  I've been trying to make a collection of them but am
having some trouble visualizing all the effects.  That's what I get
for doing this at 4 AM.  So I'd like some tried and true, or even
conceptually effective plays.

Van Vo
Washington University VBC