Air casts?

Air casts?

Post by Mike Lehner » Tue, 03 Nov 1992 11:02:55


   Say... What are the air casts that the Canadaian National Team wear?
After hearing so many good things about them, I am interested in
checking them out. I have rolled my ankles enough in the past few years
to want to avoid the situation. Well, if I would just stay out of some
of the lower level volleyball leagues, I'd probably avoid it... But, you
know what I mean.

   Oops, that is Canadian up there... My typo...

                                          - Mike -

 
 
 

Air casts?

Post by Robert Schwar » Thu, 05 Nov 1992 01:41:26

|>
|>    Say... What are the air casts that the Canadaian National Team wear?
|> After hearing so many good things about them, I am interested in
|> checking them out. I have rolled my ankles enough in the past few years
|> to want to avoid the situation. Well, if I would just stay out of some
|> of the lower level volleyball leagues, I'd probably avoid it... But, you
|> know what I mean.
|>
|>    Oops, that is Canadian up there... My typo...
|>
|>
|>
|>                                           - Mike -

AirCast's are molded plastic "splints" with an inflatable liner.  They
restrict lateral motion (turning) of the ankle,  but allow full rotational
motion (like doing calf raises, etc) for running, jumping, etc.  The sides
of the splint are held on (outside your sock) by wide velcro straps and the
bottom goes inside your shoe.  The two sides are connected at the bottom by
a piece of cloth, similar to a stirrup.  They are very light and very easy
to get used to playing in.    

I tore the ligamant (sp?) in my right ankle and had to wear one for the
rest of the season.  This was 4 years ago,  I started the next season
without it and haven't used it since.  

The biggest problem with sprained ankles is the tendancy to get back on
them too soon and then re-injur the joint.  The second injury is often
worse than the first, which needs even more time off.  If the person again
comes back too soon, the chances of re-injury are even greater.... and
so on... and so on.  

The benefit of the AirCast is that it allows the athlete to get back to
playing while providing the support that is needed and allowing the ankle
to heal.  Many people wear them as an injury preventative device.  IMHO,
this is a mistake.  If support is provided for the joint, the joint will
never "learn" to support itself.  On the other hand, if your ankles
have deteriorated enough, they might allow you to keep playing without
constant taping.

Your milage may vary

Bob Schwartz
Thinking Machines Corp.
Cambridge MA

 
 
 

Air casts?

Post by Dieter Shirl » Fri, 06 Nov 1992 02:26:30

Quote:

>   Say... What are the air casts that the Canadaian National Team wear?
>After hearing so many good things about them, I am interested in
>checking them out. I have rolled my ankles enough in the past few years
>to want to avoid the situation. Well, if I would just stay out of some
>of the lower level volleyball leagues, I'd probably avoid it... But, you
>know what I mean.

     The Canadian National teams (and a few university teams up here) wear
a device called the Safety Ankle Brace.  It is in one of the catalogues I have
for Canuck Sports Stuff.  The description:  "...The load is directed on the
footplate which is fixed at the bottom of the shoe.  The lower leg is
stabalized to the ankle joint, providing maximum medial-lateral stability
without restricting normal flexion-extension.  The brace is specifically fitted
for the left and right foot."    

     I haven't seen anyone get injured by rolling an ankle while wearing these
  They look quite flimsy, but they do provide a lot of support.

     The ankle brace costs $40/each or $75/pr (of course that's in CDN dollars))
You can contact Canuck Sports Stuff by writing to:
                  Box 84, Balzac, Alberta,  T0M 0E0
or by calling (403) 295-1118.  [fax is 275-2366].  I'm sure they'd be willing
to give you more information.

--
"Sorry, can I interrupt you for a moment, Peter, and say that the sofa has
just vanished."
"So it has.  Well, that's one mystery less..."