MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by L. Ravi Narasimh » Sun, 30 Apr 1995 04:00:00


J'accuse!

UCLA homejobs itself to the MPSF title thanks to a surfeit of grace by
up ref Ken Taylor.  Game scores were 12-15, 15-13, 15-7, and 15-5.

How much slack will Al Scates be cut at home?  The answer, it appears,
is as much as it takes for UCLA to keep winning.  UCLA jumped out
to an early 4-0 lead in game one due to shaky Hawaii passing.  Nihipali
was lukewarm as was Yuval Katz.  Hawaii went down 12-8 and finally
began to get some serves in.  They ran off seven points to take game one
15-12.  Taylor blew a call on a Hawaii ace, ruling it was out when it was
not.  Rick Tune was skying high as was Jason Olive.

Hawaii took the lead in game two by forcing bad passes.  Kevin Wong
did not start in favor of Brian Wells.  After more blistering Rainbow
rockets, UCLA was down 12-8 when Taylor began to earn his paycheck.
Curt Vaughan makes a heroic set on
a transition pass, fully turned, and with great technique.  Mishandled
ball. Jason Olive sets a ball in transition well away from the net.
Down ref Oshida calls him into the net. Manute Bol could not have hit
the net from Olive's position.  UCLA serves, Nihipali is right back.
Scates is yelling instruction, Nihipali walks up to middle front Stein
Metzger and talks as the ball is served.  No call.  
Wong came back in for Wells at 11-12 and was left front on serve.  He was
practicing his block jump with the ball in the air.  With any other
team, instant sideout.  Overlooked.  In the meantime, UCLA sets in
transition, equally questionable, are not called.  UCLA takes game two
15-13.

Wong started games three and four and, by this time, Hawaii was
sufficiently rattled.  The Rainbow players were warned (but not yellow
carded) for talking to the refs.  Taylor kept motioning for them not
to talk, the captain excepted.  Funny enough that Nygaard, Nihipali,
and company were questioning calls as well and never got chastised.
Sean Scott and Rick Tune kept Hawaii in the match while Katz was up
and down with his game. Mike Wilton subbed in Erik Pichel for setter
Curt Vaughn(egut) at 13-7 UCLA.  The final point was pure jungle ball.  UCLA
up 14-7, scrambling defense on both sides, one ref calls a UCLA player
for an illegal block (seemed like a good call,) Taylor overrules while
Erik Sullivan clambers on top of a table woofing it up, UCLA 15-7.
Wilton aksed his players not to change sides while he tried to reason
(to no avail) with Taylor.

Game four was more of the same with Hawaii able to do no right either
on passes, sets, or backrow attacks.  Never have I seen so many "over"
calls in a single match.  Curiously, they all went against
Hawaii. UCLA 15-5.

A fine kettle of fish, indeed.  I would love to see the MPSF refs
audited.  I would venture to suggest that foreign refs be brought in
for crucial matches since it is clear that "UCLA must not lose" is the
Prime Directive of West Coast volleyball.

If there is any justice, Hawaii will still get to go to Springfield.

                                --- Ravi Narasimhan

--
Ravi Narasimhan                         |"Mandrake! In the name of Her Majesty
Department of Physics, UCLA             |and the Continental Congress, get down
Los Angeles, CA 90024                   |here and help me with this thing!"

 
 
 

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by Henry OuYa » Mon, 01 May 1995 04:00:00

It was sloppy, wasn't it?
Will the 4th time be the charm for the Hawaii Rainbows to beat UCLA
this year?

 
 
 

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by Thomas R. Ts » Mon, 01 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
> (bashing of refs and call deleted)
>Game four was more of the same with Hawaii able to do no right either
>on passes, sets, or backrow attacks.  Never have I seen so many "over"
>calls in a single match.  Curiously, they all went against
>Hawaii. UCLA 15-5.

hmmm.  maybe it was because hawaii WAS over the line on those
attacks, wheras you rarely see nygaard or nihipali over the line.

Quote:
>A fine kettle of fish, indeed.  I would love to see the MPSF refs
>audited.  I would venture to suggest that foreign refs be brought in
>for crucial matches since it is clear that "UCLA must not lose" is the
>Prime Directive of West Coast volleyball.

gimme a break.  the refs weren't *that* bad.

as for my own random comments...

two points I mentioned earlier necessary for hawaii to win
both were realized in game 1.  they had incredible emotion and were
able to take kevin wong out of the game.  wong's passing went
south, esp in the latter stages of game 1, and hawaii was pumped.
hawaii also read metzger's dumps pretty well in the early stages,
and he got burned on a couple in game 1.

as a sidebar, I've said this before, and I'll say it again - I think
he dumps far too often.  against bigger and faster competition, he'll
get burned more often than not.  when I saw the national B team play
this past summer, he got stuffed about 80% of the time when he
tried to dump.

while not taking away anything from hawaii, ucla's blocking was not
performing up to snuff.  normal blocks that would've been straight
down or at least in the court were being blocked out of bounds.
These accounted for at least 8 sideouts/points.  once again, not
taking anything away from the 'bows, but I don't think it was
that their hitting was causing it.  later in the match, ucla's block
was back closer to normal, and their blocks were going down for
SO's/points.  this, combined with ucla's shutting down the middle,
was more responsible than anything else (read: bad calls) for ucla's
winning.

hawaii led by a couple of points during most of the 2nd game,
and we actually leading 12-8 or something like that when ucla
hit a good groove and won 15-13.  Brian Wells started this game,
but at the end, Kevin Wong came back in for more firepower.
hawaii's olive up to this point was  *force* in the middle.
he ended up with around 26 kills, and Katz had a match leading 27 or
so, but most of the damage caused by those guys was done in the
first 2 games.

by game 3, the big mo was definitely on UCLA's side.  they shut down
the 'bows middle.  this would leave the sides open once in a while,
but it was a price well worth paying, as olive was pretty quiet.

erik sullivan is a *very* smart hitter.  he realizes he can't hit
over people like nihipali or nygaard can, so he places the ball
very well and tools blockers extremely well.  he had over 20 kills in a
lot fewer attempts than nygaard or nihipali.  he hit over .700 (!) for
the match.  in the early games, sullivan provided a very calming
influence whenver needed by putting down a solid kill.  with practice,
I can see him being a cvrtilik (sp?) type.  he hits around blocks.
he can see when the block isn't closed properly and go through it.
he has a very nice off-speed tool.  in general, he's very aware
of the blockers.

once ucla got its middle attack running, it was pretty effective.
x's worked very well.  nygaard down the pipe was deadly.  unlike
BYU, hawaii put up a triple block whenver nygaard came down the pipe.
while theoretically very sound, it wasn't very effective.  he still
crushed them.  once in a while, he would just softly dink to one of
the front corners where there was no coverage since everybody was
crowding hte middle.  that is a truely deadly shot, esp once he's
crushed a couple.

one of hawaii's passers - aaron somebody-or-other (?) #5 - is
an awesome passer!  he passed nails.  he didn't see too many sets,
since he's a lot shorter than the others, but still, man, can he pass.

I was really impressed by hawaii's setter.  I forget his name, but
he had the blonde and green hair.  he took a lot of tough passes and
did some really good stuff with them.  when he got a good pass, he read
the block _very_ well and was able to choose the open man.  he was
especially good at doing this for their middle attack.  I swear he must
have 3 eyes.  I'm not sure why he got pulled late in the match, though.
I hated his hair but loved his setting ability.  I can't emphasize enough
how many lousy passes he took and did good, unpredicatble stuff with.

I hope somebody in sprinfield can give us reports for next week's
championships!

-tom

 
 
 

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by Larry Dewe » Tue, 02 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

> J'accuse!

> UCLA homejobs itself to the MPSF title thanks to a surfeit of grace by
> up ref Ken Taylor.  Game scores were 12-15, 15-13, 15-7, and 15-5.

Much Deletetd

> If there is any justice, Hawaii will still get to go to Springfield.

>                                 --- Ravi Narasimhan

Wow, were you watching the same match I was? Hawaii served like absolute
shit all night. They hit maybe, maybe half a dozen scorchers, but missed
servers left and right. There were so many rainbows that that's where I
thought they got their nickname. The officiating was a little strange at
times, but not on the back row attacker calls, Katz just kept going over.
There were a ton of wierd plays in the match, but none really effected the
outcome. Hawaii should have gotten a red for kicking the ball at the end
of game three giving UCLA game point no matter what.

Face it, UCLA just simply outplayed Hawaii. Near the end, the Hawaii coach
made a conscious decision to pull his setter and Olive (among others) to
rest the team for the Championships. These two teams will meet again in
Mass.

John Bain
UCLA

 
 
 

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by Henry OuYa » Tue, 02 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
> Wow, were you watching the same match I was? Hawaii served like absolute
> shit all night. They hit maybe, maybe half a dozen scorchers, but missed
> servers left and right. There were so many rainbows that that's where I
> thought they got their nickname. The officiating was a little strange at
> times, but not on the back row attacker calls, Katz just kept going over.
> There were a ton of wierd plays in the match, but none really effected the
> outcome. Hawaii should have gotten a red for kicking the ball at the end
> of game three giving UCLA game point no matter what.

> Face it, UCLA just simply outplayed Hawaii. Near the end, the Hawaii coach
> made a conscious decision to pull his setter and Olive (among others) to
> rest the team for the Championships. These two teams will meet again in
> Mass.

> John Bain
> UCLA

When Hawaii was up 12-8 in Game 2, they got 2 bad calls and lost it.  Had
they won it would take a miracle for UCLA to come back from 0-2.

The linesmen were pretty blind too.

Don't get me wrong, I'm a Bruin fan all the way.  I just want to see good
volleyball.

H

 
 
 

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by Diane W » Tue, 02 May 1995 04:00:00

If Hawai'i plays Penn State in their semifinal, they may not meet UCLA a
fourth time!

Diane Williams
"Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind." --Emerson

 
 
 

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by Mei-Chih La » Tue, 02 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
> I was really impressed by hawaii's setter.  I forget his name, but
> he had the blonde and green hair.  he took a lot of tough passes and
> did some really good stuff with them.  when he got a good pass, he read
> the block _very_ well and was able to choose the open man.  he was
> especially good at doing this for their middle attack.  I swear he must
> have 3 eyes.

That is very true.  His name is Curt Vaughan.

Quote:
> I hope somebody in sprinfield can give us reports for next week's
> championships!

> -tom

DITTO!
 
 
 

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by L. Ravi Narasimh » Tue, 02 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
>Wow, were you watching the same match I was? Hawaii served like absolute

Aw, shuucks, you got me!  I made it all up just like I've been doing all
year.  Oh well, I guess the cat is out of the deep-fat-fryer now...

Quote:
>shit all night. They hit maybe, maybe half a dozen scorchers, but missed
>servers left and right.

They did miss a bunch of serves, no doubt.  They also served well enough
to get Wong yanked.  Sullivan was aced twice in a row in game two on
vicious jumpserves and the 'bows did serve short to good effect.

There were so many rainbows that that's where I

Quote:
>thought they got their nickname. The officiating was a little strange at
>times, but not on the back row attacker calls, Katz just kept going over.

I think a couple of those were questionable.  

Quote:
>There were a ton of wierd plays in the match, but none really effected the
>outcome. Hawaii should have gotten a red for kicking the ball at the end
>of game three giving UCLA game point no matter what.

Yes, but, the officiating did take away from Hawaii's momentum and shifted
it to UCLA, especially in game two when Hawaii was up 12-8.  UCLA should
have won in five, not four.  It is hell on any team to make play after
play and have them whistled into oblivion while the other squad is not
similarly encumbered.

As far as yellow/red cards, I have watched time and again, Bruin non-captains
talk to the refs with no penalty (one exception, when Sue Lemaire was up)
while other teams get reprimanded for looking cross-eyed at the stand.  

Quote:
>Face it, UCLA just simply outplayed Hawaii. Near the end, the Hawaii coach
>made a conscious decision to pull his setter and Olive (among others) to
>rest the team for the Championships. These two teams will meet again in
>Mass.

                                --- Ravi Narasimhan
--
Ravi Narasimhan                         |"Mandrake! In the name of Her Majesty
Department of Physics, UCLA             |and the Continental Congress, get down
Los Angeles, CA 90024                   |here and help me with this thing!"

 
 
 

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by L. Ravi Narasimh » Tue, 02 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
>hmmm.  maybe it was because hawaii WAS over the line on those
>attacks, wheras you rarely see nygaard or nihipali over the line.

From where I was sitting at least two of those over calls were questionable.

Quote:
>gimme a break.  the refs weren't *that* bad.
        [ M U N C H ]
>taking anything away from the 'bows, but I don't think it was
>that their hitting was causing it.  later in the match, ucla's block
>was back closer to normal, and their blocks were going down for
>SO's/points.  this, combined with ucla's shutting down the middle,
>was more responsible than anything else (read: bad calls) for ucla's
>winning.

I think that the calls against Hawaii took the steam out of their
catapults.  I am not questioning the outcome, only the number of games
it took.  It seemed to me that the cheap calls went against Hawaii
when equivalent calls were not called against the Bruins.  Especially
as far as sets in transition.  

Quote:
>once ucla got its middle attack running, it was pretty effective.
>x's worked very well.  nygaard down the pipe was deadly.  unlike

I have no idea why Hawaii did not run its trademark double-quick more
often.  Maybe Wilton was holding something back for Springfield?

Quote:
>one of hawaii's passers - aaron somebody-or-other (?) #5 - is
>an awesome passer!  he passed nails.  he didn't see too many sets,
>since he's a lot shorter than the others, but still, man, can he pass.

Aaron Wilton. Agreed, he was excellent.  And a smart hitter for his size.

Quote:
>I was really impressed by hawaii's setter.  I forget his name, but
>he had the blonde and green hair.  he took a lot of tough passes and
>did some really good stuff with them.

Curt Vaughn(egut).  Yes, he did do a great deal with tough passes.  I
think he had to get tentative when some of those were called.  

  when he got a good pass, he read

Quote:
>the block _very_ well and was able to choose the open man.  he was
>especially good at doing this for their middle attack.  I swear he must
>have 3 eyes.

I loved the way Tune and Olive were hitting 3 meter shots in the middle.
Vaughn's setting outshone his head.

                        --- Ravi Narasimhan

--
Ravi Narasimhan                         |"Mandrake! In the name of Her Majesty
Department of Physics, UCLA             |and the Continental Congress, get down
Los Angeles, CA 90024                   |here and help me with this thing!"

 
 
 

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by Ken Hwa » Wed, 03 May 1995 04:00:00



Quote:

>> (bashing of refs and call deleted)

>>Game four was more of the same with Hawaii able to do no right either
>>on passes, sets, or backrow attacks.  Never have I seen so many "over"
>>calls in a single match.  Curiously, they all went against
>>Hawaii. UCLA 15-5.

>hmmm.  maybe it was because hawaii WAS over the line on those
>attacks, wheras you rarely see nygaard or nihipali over the line.

Actually, I thought the refs were right on top of the Backrow
attacker calls. After the first, I noticed a couple of violations
and sure enough, they were called. Note, the call is like an
under call where being on the line is still ok; touching the line
is counted as over.

Quote:

>as for my own random comments...

>two points I mentioned earlier necessary for hawaii to win
>both were realized in game 1.  they had incredible emotion and were
>able to take kevin wong out of the game.  wong's passing went
>south, esp in the latter stages of game 1, and hawaii was pumped.
>hawaii also read metzger's dumps pretty well in the early stages,
>and he got burned on a couple in game 1.

It looked like they learned something from the BYU game, because Stein was
throwing 'em down all day against BYU.

Jason Olive was Amazing in the early going, crushing the quick sets or
out of the backrow around the block at the corner of the 10' line, repeatedly.
Plus, the guy's really not that tall. A friend who's 6'1"  walked by
Jason after the BYU game. He was at most 2 inches taller. Of course
he does sky and is VERY quick. He can play.

Quote:

>hawaii led by a couple of points during most of the 2nd game,
>and we actually leading 12-8 or something like that when ucla
>hit a good groove and won 15-13.  Brian Wells started this game,
>but at the end, Kevin Wong came back in for more firepower.

Looked like Wong's back was acting up again. Saw him stretching
it out on the sideline.

Quote:
>by game 3, the big mo was definitely on UCLA's side.  they shut down
>the 'bows middle.  this would leave the sides open once in a while,
>but it was a price well worth paying, as olive was pretty quiet.

The Rainbow crowd started out drowning out the Bruin fans until
Sullivan started his cheerleading. I think the fact that the
Bow's were louder discouraged UCLA and fired Hawii up.

Quote:

>erik sullivan is a *very* smart hitter.  he realizes he can't hit
...
>I can see him being a cvrtilik (sp?) type.  he hits around blocks.

Definately. He's also an excellent passer, often taking 3/4 of the
court. (And they still serve Wong).

Quote:

>BYU, hawaii put up a triple block whenver nygaard came down the pipe.
>while theoretically very sound, it wasn't very effective.  he still
>crushed them.  once in a while, he would just softly dink to one of
>the front corners where there was no coverage since everybody was
>crowding hte middle.  that is a truely deadly shot, esp once he's
>crushed a couple.

Sweet dink from the backrow. He had the defense on it's heels.

Quote:
>I was really impressed by hawaii's setter.  I forget his name, but
>he had the blonde and green hair.  he took a lot of tough passes and
>did some really good stuff with them.  when he got a good pass, he read
>the block _very_ well and was able to choose the open man.  he was
>especially good at doing this for their middle attack.  I swear he must
>have 3 eyes.  I'm not sure why he got pulled late in the match, though.
>I hated his hair but loved his setting ability.  I can't emphasize enough
>how many lousy passes he took and did good, unpredicatble stuff with.

I was also impressed with their setter. He also had a little "hesitation"
set. He'd look like he was going to set the ball with outstretched
arms, but then bring his arms in (not carrying the ball) and set
the combination hitter and fooling the UCLA block.

Actually, both setters looked very good

Nihipali, I thought, was out of sync. He had a bunch of kills, but
seemed to have A LOT of hitting errors. His hits didn't look as
crisp and he failed to put the ball away quite a few times even
though the block wasn't solid.

As for Wong, I was pretty e***d about his play. He was actually
hitting the ball hard. Previously this year, it seemed that if
a block was up, he'd wouldn't take a good solid swing and would
be dug easily. Fri and Sat, he put a few balls down hard around
the block. And, his serves stayed in.

Best UCLA match I've seen this year.

It's not gonna be a gimme in Springfield...

-Ken

 
 
 

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by Jeff Lest » Wed, 03 May 1995 04:00:00

Quote:
Ravi writes:
>UCLA serves, Nihipali is right back.
>Scates is yelling instruction, Nihipali walks up to middle front Stein
>Metzger and talks as the ball is served.  No call.  

Not sure what you're implying, motion or overlap, but there certainly wasn't
overlap. If Metzger is middle front Nihipali was middle back (he's the
opposite). If UCLA is serving he wouldn't be right back.

Quote:
>Wong came back in for Wells at 11-12 and was left front on serve.  He was
>practicing his block jump with the ball in the air.  With any other
>team, instant sideout.  Overlooked.

Gotta agree with this one. I couldn't believe it. I wonder if they would have
called it if had grazed the net.

Quote:
>Game four was more of the same with Hawaii able to do no right either
>on passes, sets, or backrow attacks.  Never have I seen so many "over"
>calls in a single match.

Or even one game. But I saw every one of those backrow attacks that was called
and the were called correctly. Like I said in my other post I think this was due
to Pichel coming in for Vaughan.

Quote:

>hawaii also read metzger's dumps pretty well in the early stages,
>and he got burned on a couple in game 1.
>as a sidebar, I've said this before, and I'll say it again - I think
>he dumps far too often.

He had so much success against BYU Friday night that he probably figured
he could get away with it. Nope.

Quote:
>one of hawaii's passers - aaron somebody-or-other (?) #5 - is
>an awesome passer!  he passed nails.  he didn't see too many sets,
>since he's a lot shorter than the others, but still, man, can he pass.

Aaron Wilton, wasn't it? Related to the coach??

Quote:
>I was really impressed by hawaii's setter.  I forget his name, but
>he had the blonde and green hair.

Curt Vaughan was great against UCSB Friday night. Had a couple fantastic blocks
and was doing some great setting. I thought he played well against UCLA and
still don't understand why the coach pulled him.

---
*************************
Jeff Lester

*************************

 
 
 

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by L. Ravi Narasimh » Thu, 04 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
>Not sure what you're implying, motion or overlap, but there certainly wasn't
>overlap. If Metzger is middle front Nihipali was middle back (he's the
>opposite). If UCLA is serving he wouldn't be right back.

I thought he had to be stationary while the ball was served, just like the
receiving team has to wait before the setter can break for the net.  If
Metzger is serving, dowsn't it mean that Nihipali can be close to the right
endline since Metzger is technically off the court?  For example, can't a
middle-back setter in 6-2 be on the right sideline while the ball is
served? Maybe I am not up on my rules.  Rob Peglar?

Quote:
>>Wong came back in for Wells at 11-12 and was left front on serve.  He was
>>practicing his block jump with the ball in the air.  With any other
>>team, instant sideout.  Overlooked.
>Gotta agree with this one. I couldn't believe it. I wonder if they would have
>called it if had grazed the net.

  [ MUNCH ]

Quote:
>Aaron Wilton, wasn't it? Related to the coach??

I believe he is Mike Wilton's son...

Quote:
>Curt Vaughan was great against UCSB Friday night. Had a couple fantastic blocks
>and was doing some great setting. I thought he played well against UCLA and
>still don't understand why the coach pulled him.

Could be resting him for the Final Four...  At that point, why not let the
starters rest and some others get game time before the Big Show...

--
Ravi Narasimhan                         |"Mandrake! In the name of Her Majesty
Department of Physics, UCLA             |and the Continental Congress, get down
Los Angeles, CA 90024                   |here and help me with this thing!"

 
 
 

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by scott markows » Fri, 05 May 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

>>>Wong came back in for Wells at 11-12 and was left front on serve.  He was
>>>practicing his block jump with the ball in the air.  With any other
>>>team, instant sideout.  Overlooked.

>>Gotta agree with this one. I couldn't believe it. I wonder if they would have
>>called it if had grazed the net.

Unless, I don't understand the situation, this
isn't a problem.  According to screen rules,
it's not a fault unless the serve passes over
the player quilty of a screen.

Scott Marks

 
 
 

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by David Kissing » Fri, 05 May 1995 04:00:00

: It was sloppy, wasn't it?
: Will the 4th time be the charm for the Hawaii Rainbows to beat UCLA
: this year?

Maybe in the third place match, yes.

GO PENN STATE!!!!!!!!

 
 
 

MPSF Final: UCLA vs. Hawaii

Post by Rob Pegl » Sat, 06 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

>>Not sure what you're implying, motion or overlap, but there certainly wasn't
>>overlap. If Metzger is middle front Nihipali was middle back (he's the
>>opposite). If UCLA is serving he wouldn't be right back.

>I thought he had to be stationary while the ball was served, just like the
>receiving team has to wait before the setter can break for the net.  If
>Metzger is serving, dowsn't it mean that Nihipali can be close to the right
>endline since Metzger is technically off the court?  For example, can't a
>middle-back setter in 6-2 be on the right sideline while the ball is
>served? Maybe I am not up on my rules.  Rob Peglar?

Yes?  :-)

The overlap rule is: (USA Rules 10.1.3 et seq)

a) left-side (LF,LB) players must have at least a part of a foot closer
   to the left sideline than the corresponding middle (MF,MB) player
b) ditto for right-side/right sideline
c) front-row players must have at least a part of a foot closer to the
   center line than their corresponding back-row players

That's it.  The only commentary in the book is that the position of the
players is judged at the moment of contact for service.

There are no other restrictions.  Players may be moving at any time; the
commentary applies.  You don't have to be stationary.

Only the server is exempt from the rule. (10.1.3.2) All 6 on the receiving side
must adhere to the rule, and the other 5 on the serving side must
adhere. So, in the case that Oski mentioned above, yes, the MB can be
on the right sideline during service, under USA rules.

Rob

--
-legal mumbo jumbo follows-
This mail/post only reflects the opinions of the poster (author), and in
no manner reflects any corporate policy, statement, opinion, or other
expression by NSC, Storage Technology Inc. and its subsidiaries.