Volleybal Jargon

Volleybal Jargon

Post by Graeme Wong S » Fri, 11 Oct 1991 12:29:35


Could someone provide an explaination of some of the jargon that comes with
volleyball. Some terms that come to mind are

        swing hitter
        outside hitter  

        any others??

Also what do the numbers mean when people say they run  a 6 - 2 position or
5-1?

thanks

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Volleybal Jargon

Post by Chengi Jimmy K » Sun, 13 Oct 1991 10:31:10

Quote:


>>Also what do the numbers mean when people say they run  a 6 - 2 position or
>>5-1?
>6-0, which tends to mean the middle front person sets.

6-0 is to most people the same as a 6-2.  I found in my playing that east coast
people always say "6-2" and on the west coast, it's close to interchangeable.
Tell me Don, are you from the east coast, though your address says Stanford?

Quote:
>In something often called "international 4-2", your setter always plays the
>front-right position

So far, so good.

Quote:
>(similar to 6-2),
>with a middle hitter and strong (left) side hitter in front of them.  These
>offenses typically use a backrow player to hit 10-foot backsets on the right
>side.

In the 6-2, the setter sets from the just right of middle and has 3 hitters to
set to, he does not play the front-right position.  He "plays" the right-back
position in what is normally referred to as the middle back defense.  And one
of the hardest things to teach a 6-2 setter is that "defense comes first."

Jimmy Kuo
--

"The correct answer to an either/or question is both!"

 
 
 

Volleybal Jargon

Post by Don Gedd » Sun, 13 Oct 1991 03:20:09


Quote:
>Also what do the numbers mean when people say they run  a 6 - 2 position or
>5-1?

These numbers vary a little bit, but generally the first digit is how
many (of the six) people on the court are hitters during some rotation,
and the second is how many designated setters you have.  Thus in a 6-2
everyone on the court will be a hitter at some point, and two of the
people have setting responsibilities as well.  In a 5-1, there is one
individual who does all the setting, and the other five people are hitters.

Other common ones are 4-2 (like 6-2 but you have your front-row "designated
setter" be the actual setter for a given rotation, rather than the back-row
one), and 6-0, which tends to mean the middle front person sets.  Don't
know why this last one isn't called 6-6 to match the meaning of the others.
Perhaps because there are zero individuals designated as setters, but rather
it is the position that determines who will set.

Other slight variations: In typical 4-2, where you have two hitters and one
setter at the net, the setter will play the middle-front position, spreading
the hitters out to either side.  In something often called "international
4-2", your setter always plays the front-right position (similar to 6-2),
with a middle hitter and strong (left) side hitter in front of them.  These
offenses typically use a backrow player to hit 10-foot backsets on the right
side.

        -- Don Geddis
--

"Of course, long before you mature, most of you will be eaten."

 
 
 

Volleybal Jargon

Post by Graeme Wong S » Fri, 11 Oct 1991 12:29:35

Could someone provide an explaination of some of the jargon that comes with

eyball. Some terms that come to mind are

        swing hitter
        outside hitter  

        any others??

Also what do the ne nes mean wan waeople say they run  a 6G% 2 position or
5-1?

thanks

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P.O. Box 313 North Ryde, N, N, Australia 2113 | Fax:   +:   +: 2  2   2929
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Volleybal Jargon

Post by David Lo » Tue, 15 Oct 1991 10:27:35


Quote:
>Could someone provide an explaination of some of the jargon that comes with
>eyball. Some terms that come to mind are
>    swing hitter

---------------------------------------------------------------------
A swing hitter is a front court player who hits the ball from a      
different position to that which he starts off in. He may run around and
hit the ball from behind the setter if he is infront of him.
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote:
>    outside hitter  

--------------------------------------------------------------------
An outside hitter is simply that an outside hitter. This is usually a
term given to a player who is very consistant and can hit a ball in
very frequently. They usually hit from the outside and usually hit
release balls when a combination doesn't work
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote:
>    any others??

Also what do the ne nes mean wan waeople say they run  a 6G% 2 position or
Quote:
>-------------------------------------------------------------------

When describing positions on the court a number system is applied

================================================================(NET)
    *                           *                        *
Position 4                  position 3               position 2
(outside hitter)        (centre blocker/setter)        

    *                           *                        *
position 5                  position 6              position 1
                                                     (server)

this is the simplest formation but the relative positions do not change
what ever the formation. So a 60% 2 position is the 2 position tending
backwards towards the 1 position.
-----------------------------------------------------------------

5-1?

------------------------------------------------------------------
A 5 - 1 would be a command given by a setter to a front court player.
Remember that the three back court players may not jump and hit the
ball in front of the three metre line. The 5 part is the position
on the court from which the hitter will hit the ball (whether he is
in that position or not). the 1 part refers to the type of set that
will be received. the Australian conventional setting system is as
follows :
1 - a short set one metre above the net.
2 this is the same as a 1 except the setter sets it behind his head.
3 - is a long set usuall cutting out a player (this is the type of
ball an outside hitter hits).
A - this is a very short ball that only just clears the net and is hit
very quickly after it is set.
B - this is a long set that is set at net height and usually cuts out
one front court hitter)
C - this is the same as an A except the setter sets it behind his head.
Antennae ball - this is a ball set all the way out to the antennae
and the hitter usually hits it down the line.
Shoot ball - this is an antennae ball except the set is set very hard  
and the ball is hit as if it was an A.

So now the setter tells the player to run a 4 - 1 which means he will
hit a 1 from position 4.
or a 2 - a which means he will hit an A from position 2 and so on.      
--------------------------------------------------------------------

Hope i HAVE NOT CONFUSED YOU TOO MUCH IT MAKES GOOD SENSE TO ME

                                                 DAVID LONG
                                                 CENTRAL COAST
                                                 AUSTRALIA

 
 
 

Volleybal Jargon

Post by Chengi Jimmy K » Tue, 15 Oct 1991 16:14:16

Quote:

>5-1?

Simply, a 5-1 is where there is one setter, the same setter, all the
time.  Others have covered this so I won't any more.

Quote:
>A 5 - 1 would be a command given by a setter to a front court player.
>Remember that the three back court players may not jump and hit the
>ball in front of the three metre line. The 5 part is the position
>on the court from which the hitter will hit the ball (whether he is
>in that position or not). the 1 part refers to the type of set that
>will be received. the Australian conventional setting system is as
>follows :
>1 - a short set one metre above the net.
>2 this is the same as a 1 except the setter sets it behind his head.
>3 - is a long set usuall cutting out a player (this is the type of
>ball an outside hitter hits).
>A - this is a very short ball that only just clears the net and is hit
>very quickly after it is set.
>B - this is a long set that is set at net height and usually cuts out
>one front court hitter)
>C - this is the same as an A except the setter sets it behind his head.
>Antennae ball - this is a ball set all the way out to the antennae
>and the hitter usually hits it down the line.
>Shoot ball - this is an antennae ball except the set is set very hard  
>and the ball is hit as if it was an A.
>So now the setter tells the player to run a 4 - 1 which means he will
>hit a 1 from position 4.
>or a 2 - a which means he will hit an A from position 2 and so on.      
>Hope i HAVE NOT CONFUSED YOU TOO MUCH IT MAKES GOOD SENSE TO ME

Goody.  More terminologies!  While we're confusing people, a "5-1", or
more commonly, "fifty-one" is what you're referring to.  Hit a "1" set
from position 5.  These positions are net positions, the net is divided
into 6 equal parts numbered 1 to 6 from the left.  In this case, the
setter usually occupies position 4 (slightly to the right of center).
Back row players get 10, 20, 30, ..., or 60 sets.  That would be sets
for equivalent 1-6 positions for back row players to hit from the 10
foot line.

Another "51": That would be the setter calling the play.  On serve
receive, the setter calls that the play to be run on the serve receive is
play number five.  And should that not put the ball away, the second play
will be play number one.

This all goes to show, numeric terminology differs depending on where you
come from and who you've been exposed to.

Jimmy Kuo
--

"The correct answer to an either/or question is both!"