Outdoor setting - rule question

Outdoor setting - rule question

Post by John Ver » Sun, 05 Jun 1994 03:09:07


I was playing grass doubles against a friend of mine yesterday when he dumped
the ball over on the second hit.  He called a "bad set" on himeself because
he was not "set", meaning his feet were not on the ground.  The set was
perfectly perpendicular to his shoulders, but he was in the process of jump
setting.  Oddly enough, I was arguing that the play was legal, and he was saying
it was not.  Who was right?

John

 
 
 

Outdoor setting - rule question

Post by Bruce Kv » Mon, 06 Jun 1994 08:23:09

Quote:
>I was playing grass doubles against a friend of mine yesterday when he dumped
>the ball over on the second hit.  He called a "bad set" on himeself because
>he was not "set", meaning his feet were not on the ground.  The set was
>perfectly perpendicular to his shoulders, but he was in the process of jump
>setting.  Oddly enough, I was arguing that the play was legal, and he was saying
>it was not.  Who was right?

There is a tradition of calling these sorts of plays outdoors because
they are really mistakes, and people feel guilty by profiting from
questionable ball handling.  Generally the reasoning seems to be that if
you hand-set over on two you probably carried or double-contacted.  This
is borne out by the tradition that bump-sets over on two are not called
and are completely legal.

Strictly speaking, though, if you overset with the hands and it's a clean,
straight-ahead or straight-back set, it is legal.  This isn't generally
a problem with the pros because the other team will spike an overset
because they're usually up blocking, but lower-level players block a lot
less and will be surprised by this and let them drop.
---
Bruce Kvam


 
 
 

Outdoor setting - rule question

Post by Torsten Heyc » Wed, 08 Jun 1994 05:18:37


Quote:

> I was playing grass doubles against a friend of mine yesterday when he dumped
> the ball over on the second hit.  He called a "bad set" on himeself because
> he was not "set", meaning his feet were not on the ground.  The set was
> perfectly perpendicular to his shoulders, but he was in the process of jump
> setting.  Oddly enough, I was arguing that the play was legal, and he was saying
> it was not.  Who was right?

> John

John,

It depends which rules you're playing by. There is no explicit USVBA
outdoor rule, but the FOVA rules (Section IV, Rule 12.4) state: A player
must be momentarily stationary before setting the ball. Setting while the
body of the player is in motion is an indication of improper technique.
Jump setting is also likely to be penalized. Of course, FOVA is now
extinct and I'm still waiting for my AVA (which replaces FOVA) rulebook
(anyone else get one yet?)
The AVP didn't have a rule specifically addressing jumpsetting, although I
asked one of the refs at an AVP tournament some years ago about this, and
he said basically the same thing about "the body of the player is in motion
is an indication of improper technique."

Torsten