To buy or not to buy '94 ProStar

To buy or not to buy '94 ProStar

Post by Peter Tenereill » Wed, 08 Mar 1995 03:10:47


Quote:
>I am considering buying a 1994 Pro-Star 190 but the boat does not have
>the  power-slot option.  The boat will be used for family and friends not
>for competition skiing.  I understand the concept of gear reduction, but...

I know the question was about PowerSlot but in case you're interested:

I had a '92 ProStar (same hull) for only one year, and was very
dissapointed. IMHO, tournament inboards are not the right choice
for "family and friends, not for competition skiing". The boats are
just not made for recreational skiers. The hull takes a beating in
all but smooth water, and the high speed performance is marginal
(even with the LT1 or 454).

An 18 foot 4.3LX stern drive will have all the pull you need, travel
quietly in the 40-50MPH range, max out in the mid-50MPH range, give
more interior room, and slice lake or delta afternoon chop with
class. Better yet, it should save you about $10K. I'm currently selling
my MasterCraft outboard and will be looking for a good used boat
like this myself... just like the one I sold before I got my ProStar!

P.S. I did use my stern drive in the slalom course before I got the
ProStar. It's doable, but it is really tough on the driver. Basically,
unless they're an expert the driver will bump every other bouy...
and then the people on the dock will all yell at you. Hate it when
that happens!

 
 
 

To buy or not to buy '94 ProStar

Post by Peter Wheel » Wed, 08 Mar 1995 11:00:45


know the question was about PowerSlot but in case you're interested:

Quote:

>I had a '92 ProStar (same hull) for only one year, and was very
>dissapointed. IMHO, tournament inboards are not the right choice
>for "family and friends, not for competition skiing". The boats are
>just not made for recreational skiers. The hull takes a beating in
>all but smooth water, and the high speed performance is marginal
>(even with the LT1 or 454).

>An 18 foot 4.3LX stern drive will have all the pull you need, travel
>quietly in the 40-50MPH range, max out in the mid-50MPH range, give
>more interior room, and slice lake or delta afternoon chop with
>class.

Three comments.

First, tournament inboards provide skiing performance that no stern
drive can match and will allow a recreational skier to improve
immediately (no mountain wakes to cross, smoother pull, great tracking).
It is also much easier to teach people to ski from an inboard.  Sure
it's a much smaller boat with less room for the water wings and the le'
tube and the 12 fenders usually found flopping on the sides of a stern
drive as it bounds across the lake, but hey, performance has a price.

Second, SKIERS don't ski "afternoon chop".  Not even recreational
skiers.  Wallies ski afternoon chop.  So if you are a skier, go for the
tournament inboard.  And don't worry about a bounce or two.

Third, you deserve to get yelled at if you run the course with an IO.  
Every boat guide you cut out with your prop has to be replaced.  And as
the tether gets cut repeatedly, it begins to become a real pain in the
ass to dive to replace it.  In my experience, the cutter rarely replaces
his own damage.

I went from a 21' Sea Ray to a ProStar 190 and only regret waiting as
long as I did.  And I am a recreational skier who skis with friends and
family all the time.

 
 
 

To buy or not to buy '94 ProStar

Post by Orlando Garcia, J » Thu, 09 Mar 1995 23:46:34


Quote:

>I know the question was about PowerSlot but in case you're interested:

>I had a '92 ProStar (same hull) for only one year, and was very
>dissapointed. IMHO, tournament inboards are not the right choice
>for "family and friends, not for competition skiing". The boats are
>just not made for recreational skiers. The hull takes a beating in
>all but smooth water, and the high speed performance is marginal
>(even with the LT1 or 454).

>An 18 foot 4.3LX stern drive will have all the pull you need, travel
>quietly in the 40-50MPH range, max out in the mid-50MPH range, give
>more interior room, and slice lake or delta afternoon chop with
>class. Better yet, it should save you about $10K. I'm currently selling
>my MasterCraft outboard and will be looking for a good used boat
>like this myself... just like the one I sold before I got my ProStar!

>P.S. I did use my stern drive in the slalom course before I got the
>ProStar. It's doable, but it is really tough on the driver. Basically,
>unless they're an expert the driver will bump every other bouy...
>and then the people on the dock will all yell at you. Hate it when
>that happens!

What the hell are you saying?  Let's not define skiing as just these
two extremes; namely, "family and friends" and "competition." There
are several mid-points you are failing to consider.  If a guy subscribes
to this group, one has to assume that his interest in water skiing
exceeds that of the average wally who takes off the tool belt 3 times a
year and cruises down to the lake with that boat that barely starts up
at the ramp; that of the type that would *prefer* an I/O (no flame
catalyst intended).  They both have applications on the water and are
well worthy of there presence there.

The bottom line is, if you want to improve your skiing and go to the lake
in pursuit of that challenge enough to justify the added expense of a
tool designed for that job, buy it! It will not be a question of *if* you
can get friends on board, but how many.  Besides, if you are serious
enough to buy a tournament boat, you should not worry about friends -
they will not be paying your bills. I have had instances where I take
8 people in my Mastercraft with lawn chairs, coolers, etc.  Then we find
a clear shore, drop some folks and their gear off, leaving 3 or 4 people
in the boat, and proceed to take turns picking people up to ski - a real
blast!  You get the boat you want *first*, then worry about the social
details later.

Now, if you want to grill hot dogs on your transom and suck down beer
with 3 other guys and 4 babes*** over the side of your boat, while
one of you decides to dawn a ski or 2 and take a pull, that is a different
story! Get the I/O and you will be able to do this.  However, I doubt that
the performance with a 4.3 will be "all the pull you need" expecially
with that many people on board.  And after tossing a few brews down at
the lake, the last thing you need is the ability to go faster than a
tournament boat's 40+ MPH.

Please Peter, do not try to tell me or anyone else in this group that an
I/O is all a guy would ever want and that it works well enough for skiing
applications except the course. I highly recommend that if you want to

1.      "travel quietly in the 40-50MPH range,"
2.      "max out in the mid-50MPH range,"
3.      "slice lake or delta afternoon chop with class,"

you subscribe to rec.sport.arm-chair-wally.  If you want to ski, pull that
F/S sign off of your Craft, and stick around. This discussion is like
comparing the tools of a house-framer to those of a cabinet maker - 2
totally different animals.

Regards,

Orlando
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                     |                   | The opinions expressed may
 Orlando Garcia, Jr. | Texas Instruments | belong to anyone, you just

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 
 
 

To buy or not to buy '94 ProStar

Post by Steve Dav » Sat, 11 Mar 1995 01:24:48

Quote:


>Subject: RE: To buy or not to buy '94 ProStar
>Date: 9 Mar 1995 04:23:03 GMT
>Ditto everything Peter said.  I have a Prostar 190 and a 19 ft Campion
>I/O.  The I/O is for sale because I have not skied behind it in 2 years.  
>Need I say more.

If you looking for a ski boat, you can't get much better that the Prostar
190.  If you are looking for an all-around family boat, there are some
drawbacks to the 190.  It was not designed to carry more than about
three people with a skier behind.  You might concider the open-bow
version (I don't remember the model).  It is a little bigger and can carry
a few more people.  I've never skied behind one, but from what I
understand, it's a pretty nice boat.

For me, I'll take the 190.  Better yet, give me a Flightcraft.  When I go
skiing, we usually don't have problems with too many people in the
boat.  At 6 am and 50 degrees, I'm lucky if I can find a driver.

Steve

 
 
 

To buy or not to buy '94 ProStar

Post by Gregory Ca » Fri, 10 Mar 1995 13:23:03

Ditto everything Peter said.  I have a Prostar 190 and a 19 ft Campion
I/O.  The I/O is for sale because I have not skied behind it in 2 years.  
Need I say more.
 
 
 

To buy or not to buy '94 ProStar

Post by Michael A. Dona » Sat, 11 Mar 1995 13:24:06


:Three comments.

:First, tournament inboards provide skiing performance that no stern
:drive can match and will allow a recreational skier to improve
:immediately (no mountain wakes to cross, smoother pull, great tracking).
:It is also much easier to teach people to ski from an inboard.  Sure
:it's a much smaller boat with less room for the water wings and the le'
:tube and the 12 fenders usually found flopping on the sides of a stern
:drive as it bounds across the lake, but hey, performance has a price.
:
:Second, SKIERS don't ski "afternoon chop".  Not even recreational
:skiers.  Wallies ski afternoon chop.  So if you are a skier, go for the
:tournament inboard.  And don't worry about a bounce or two.
:
:Third, you deserve to get yelled at if you run the course with an IO.  
:Every boat guide you cut out with your prop has to be replaced.  And as
:the tether gets cut repeatedly, it begins to become a real pain in the
:ass to dive to replace it.  In my experience, the cutter rarely replaces
:his own damage.
:
:I went from a 21' Sea Ray to a ProStar 190 and only regret waiting as
:long as I did.  And I am a recreational skier who skis with friends and
:family all the time.

I couldn't have said it better myself. I can't stand it when I get up early
and head out to the course and find that somebody cut the tether and didn't
fix it. And I too ski with my friends ALL the time.  I think most of
you will agree that there isn't a substantial difference in the wakes
from the Ski Nautique closed bow to the Ski Nautique open bow, and the
same with the Mastercraft ProStar 190 and 205 (especially for
recreational skiers). Sorry to waste all the bandwidth with this post, but I
just wanted to back up your brilliant statement.
                                                Mike Donato

 
 
 

To buy or not to buy '94 ProStar

Post by Peter Wheel » Wed, 15 Mar 1995 00:56:38


Quote:

>Actually,  I would trade my Mastercraft for a particular I/O in a
minute.
>And yes,  the I/O is tournament approved.

>--
>Mike Kravetz                                

Tournament approved???  You must be reading those twinkie induced
reviews by Waterski magazine (i.e., "for versatile family skiing and
occasional training by the more serious skier, you just can't beat the
Hatteras 43 convertible.")  Or maybe the boat has the AWSA tournament
rating?  I think my wife's Accord got a tournament rating this year.

Pete

 
 
 

To buy or not to buy '94 ProStar

Post by Dan Hoffm » Wed, 15 Mar 1995 02:00:00

Quote:

>Actually,  I would trade my Mastercraft for a particular I/O in a minute.
>And yes,  the I/O is tournament approved.

>--

 the question is which tournament??

dan                          

 
 
 

To buy or not to buy '94 ProStar

Post by Barefoo » Wed, 15 Mar 1995 12:26:35

<<Actually,  I would trade my Mastercraft for a particular I/O in a
minute.
And yes,  the I/O is tournament approved.>>>

<< the question is which tournament??>>>
<<"for versatile family skiing and
occasional training by the more serious skier, you just can't beat the
Hatteras 43 convertible.")  I think my wife's Accord got a tournament
rating this year.>>>

Rofl!!!!
hehehe..great responses guys!

Aside from all that, I do know that the Ski-Pro Footer and EX are both
I/O's, are tournament approved and used, and have an excellent wake and
holeshot for barefooting.

Bare. :))
(Keep me smiling, reading all these)

 
 
 

To buy or not to buy '94 ProStar

Post by ed balcewi » Thu, 16 Mar 1995 14:11:18


Quote:


>Actually,  I would trade my Mastercraft for a particular I/O in a minute.
>And yes,  the I/O is tournament approved.

>--
>Mike Kravetz                            | IBM RISC System 6000

Hey Mike

What year is your Mastercraft & what kind of I/O are you talking about
that would be "tournament approved".

If you had a Mastercraft & you waterskied or Barefooted I am very
surprised to see such a statement.

Anyone who skis behing an M/C or other quality inboard would never make
such a silly statement.

Ed B