Help my 190 dives to the right

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by racn » Sun, 26 Sep 1999 04:00:00


        I just bought a 1994 mastercraft prostar 190 and at any speed if
you let go the wheel will spin to the right.   I know that there is
supposed to be some pull but this seems a awful lot.  Is there an
adjustment or is this just normal?
Thanks Ryan
 
 
 

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by Tom and Michelle Harvane » Sun, 26 Sep 1999 04:00:00

Most will argue that it is normal, and by design (purposely) Some steering
systems have adjustable preload on the steering rack., A lock nut and an
adjuster, use two wrenches, and try increments 1/8 turn or smaller.
This slight increase in steering effort, may be enough, but if not, others here
can coach you on tweaking your rudder to be more neutral.
Before you do any of that, has it always been like this or is this something
new?
Tom
Quote:

>         I just bought a 1994 mastercraft prostar 190 and at any speed if
> you let go the wheel will spin to the right.   I know that there is
> supposed to be some pull but this seems a awful lot.  Is there an
> adjustment or is this just normal?
> Thanks Ryan


 
 
 

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by Mark Kovalcso » Sun, 26 Sep 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

> I just bought a 1994 mastercraft prostar 190 and at any speed if you let go the wheel will spin to the right.   I know that there is supposed to be some pull but this seems a awful lot.  Is there an adjustment or is this just normal?

I like it this way. It makes for quick bat turns. Drop the throttle and
just let the steering wheel loose in your left hand. Instant 180 degree
turn. Just make sure to give it a bit of gas at the end of the turn so
you don't get water in the transom.

I think you should drive it in the ski course for a while to see how it
improves your tracking to have it set up this way. Having it pull to one
side can remove any play in the steering system and makes steering
inputs very immediate.

If you are sure you hate the way this pulls you could trim the left side
of the trailing edge of your rudder with a file and the rudder would
pull more to the left, but it is important to do this in little bitty
increments on a very small section of rudder. Someone has probably
already filed the rudder on the other side to get it like you have it
now.

--

Mark Kovalcson
http://www.perfectpull.com
Waterski Training Equipment

 
 
 

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by Mark Leno » Sun, 26 Sep 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

>         I just bought a 1994 mastercraft prostar 190 and at any speed if
> you let go the wheel will spin to the right.   I know that there is
> supposed to be some pull but this seems a awful lot.  Is there an
> adjustment or is this just normal?
> Thanks Ryan

The new ('99+) Ski Nautiques have an adjustable rudder.   It's a relatively
new idea though, and your boat definitely does not have it.

This is usually done by somebody who thinks they are going to make their
boat track straighter down the course.   As far as I can tell, all it does
it make the boat a pain to drive, and dangerous as well.   Nobody is going
to be able to convince me that a hard right turn caused by just letting go
of the steering wheel (for whatever reason) is safe.   Just imagine if cars
were like that.   Neither are they going to convince me that making the boat
pull to one side is going to make it track better, unless the steering
system is hoplessly worn out and loose, which is another problem altogether.

It was done by grinding on the trailing edge of the rudder on the starboard
(drivers') side.

You could reduce the effect by grinding on the other side.   If you do so,
go slowly, and be careful not to go to far.   Grind a little, put the boat
in the water, try it, take the boat out and try some more.

A hand file won't hardly touch it, use a disc grinder of some sort.   Your
arms will thank you.

Yours is a good slalom boat, make sure the steering is in good working
order, and it will track great without preloading the rudder.

Mark Lenox

 
 
 

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by Kevin R Baug » Sun, 26 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Quote:


> >         I just bought a 1994 mastercraft prostar 190 and at any speed if
> > you let go the wheel will spin to the right.   I know that there is
> > supposed to be some pull but this seems a awful lot.  Is there an
> > adjustment or is this just normal?
> > Thanks Ryan

> The new ('99+) Ski Nautiques have an adjustable rudder.   It's a
relatively
> new idea though, and your boat definitely does not have it.

Nice comercial Mark :-)

Quote:
> This is usually done by somebody who thinks they are going to make their
> boat track straighter down the course.   As far as I can tell, all it does
> it make the boat a pain to drive, and dangerous as well.   Nobody is going
> to be able to convince me that a hard right turn caused by just letting go
> of the steering wheel (for whatever reason) is safe.   Just imagine if
cars
> were like that.   Neither are they going to convince me that making the
boat
> pull to one side is going to make it track better, unless the steering
> system is hoplessly worn out and loose, which is another problem
altogether.

I have to disagree with you well sort of. I hate driving a neutral steering
boat throught the course. To me if feels like it is floating the whole time.
But there was a time when MasterCraft went way over board with the grinder.
Just a little pull on the wheel is great to much is dangerous and a lot of
work.

Quote:
> It was done by grinding on the trailing edge of the rudder on the
starboard
> (drivers') side.

> You could reduce the effect by grinding on the other side.   If you do so,
> go slowly, and be careful not to go to far.   Grind a little, put the boat
> in the water, try it, take the boat out and try some more.

> A hand file won't hardly touch it, use a disc grinder of some sort.   Your
> arms will thank you.

> Yours is a good slalom boat, make sure the steering is in good working
> order, and it will track great without preloading the rudder.

> Mark Lenox

 
 
 

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by Mark Leno » Mon, 27 Sep 1999 04:00:00

Quote:


> > The new ('99+) Ski Nautiques have an adjustable rudder.   It's a
> relatively
> > new idea though, and your boat definitely does not have it.

> Nice comercial Mark :-)

A good idea is a good idea no matter who does it.

BTW, I really like the new adjustable ballast/trim system to compensate for
passenger weight on the new MasterCrafts.    I'd love to have such a thing on my
SN, we would use it alot.

Anything that helps the driver give the skier a better pull is a good idea in my
book.

There, now we're even.

Mark Lenox

 
 
 

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by Bill » Tue, 28 Sep 1999 04:00:00

I agree. We asked our dealer to grind out most (but not all the excess pull)
during our annual maintenance check up. We told him that we wanted a slight
load at 34-36 mph as my father skis at 34 and I'm at 36. The dealer took too
much load off though. The boat does float... It does NOT track too well in
the course. We'll need to add some load again in order to make it better for
the course. The goal is getting enough load to help in the course but not
too much.

Our boat is a little older...the method to change load is literally grinding
away a portion of the rudder to change its shape. Always do it in small
increments. You can't add to the rudder quite as easily as you can take it
away.

PS - Prior posters are correct. Too much load is dangerous. You are
constantly reminding yourself to keep pressure on the wheel. The bat turns
are faster than you can possible be prepared for (just wait and see your
observer fly out of the boat).

PPS - The more load you put on the rudder the more gas you will guzzle too.
We had enough load on our rudder that we could see the difference in how
much gas we drank each day.

Bill



Quote:



> > >         I just bought a 1994 mastercraft prostar 190 and at any speed
if
> > > you let go the wheel will spin to the right.   I know that there is
> > > supposed to be some pull but this seems a awful lot.  Is there an
> > > adjustment or is this just normal?
> > > Thanks Ryan

> > The new ('99+) Ski Nautiques have an adjustable rudder.   It's a
> relatively
> > new idea though, and your boat definitely does not have it.

> Nice comercial Mark :-)

> > This is usually done by somebody who thinks they are going to make their
> > boat track straighter down the course.   As far as I can tell, all it
does
> > it make the boat a pain to drive, and dangerous as well.   Nobody is
going
> > to be able to convince me that a hard right turn caused by just letting
go
> > of the steering wheel (for whatever reason) is safe.   Just imagine if
> cars
> > were like that.   Neither are they going to convince me that making the
> boat
> > pull to one side is going to make it track better, unless the steering
> > system is hoplessly worn out and loose, which is another problem
> altogether.

> I have to disagree with you well sort of. I hate driving a neutral
steering
> boat throught the course. To me if feels like it is floating the whole
time.
> But there was a time when MasterCraft went way over board with the
grinder.
> Just a little pull on the wheel is great to much is dangerous and a lot of
> work.

> > It was done by grinding on the trailing edge of the rudder on the
> starboard
> > (drivers') side.

> > You could reduce the effect by grinding on the other side.   If you do
so,
> > go slowly, and be careful not to go to far.   Grind a little, put the
boat
> > in the water, try it, take the boat out and try some more.

> > A hand file won't hardly touch it, use a disc grinder of some sort.
Your
> > arms will thank you.

> > Yours is a good slalom boat, make sure the steering is in good working
> > order, and it will track great without preloading the rudder.

> > Mark Lenox

 
 
 

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by Todd Zaug » Tue, 28 Sep 1999 04:00:00

I've driven a number of MC's that had an amazing amount of torque on the
rudder.  Dangerous would be an understatement for a number of the boats that
I have driven.  There is a fine line between too much and not enough when it
comes to rudder torque and pre-load.  One thing for sure...you don't need
much torque steer to maintain a straight line, and most MC's I've been in go
way too far!
Quote:

>THe only reason for this is to main tain a load on the stearing wheel to
>hold you through a slalom course if you remove this bias which is correct
>when you try to hold it straight you will find with no resistance you keep
>correcting and will fail the pass leave well alone anybody telling you
>different does not know what they are talking about Mastercraft Service


>>         I just bought a 1994 mastercraft prostar 190 and at any speed if
>> you let go the wheel will spin to the right.   I know that there is
>> supposed to be some pull but this seems a awful lot.  Is there an
>> adjustment or is this just normal?
>> Thanks Ryan

 
 
 

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by Tom Rut » Wed, 29 Sep 1999 04:00:00

...

Quote:
>> Nice comercial Mark :-)

>A good idea is a good idea no matter who does it.

Wasn't it from American Skier? (Ron Tanis)

Quote:
>BTW, I really like the new adjustable ballast/trim system to compensate for
>passenger weight on the new MasterCrafts.    I'd love to have such a thing on my
>SN, we would use it alot.

I use a 10 gallon flexible water container in my canoe to
compensate for my much lighter young son.  Maybe that'd
work?

Tom

 
 
 

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by Bill » Wed, 29 Sep 1999 04:00:00

I think American Skier did it first (or announced it first), but Mastercraft
has the "passenger"-simulator as well now.

Bill


Quote:

> ...
> >> Nice comercial Mark :-)

> >A good idea is a good idea no matter who does it.

> Wasn't it from American Skier? (Ron Tanis)

> >BTW, I really like the new adjustable ballast/trim system to compensate
for
> >passenger weight on the new MasterCrafts.    I'd love to have such a
thing on my
> >SN, we would use it alot.

> I use a 10 gallon flexible water container in my canoe to
> compensate for my much lighter young son.  Maybe that'd
> work?

> Tom

 
 
 

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by Kevin R Baug » Wed, 29 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Quote:



> > > The new ('99+) Ski Nautiques have an adjustable rudder.   It's a
> > relatively
> > > new idea though, and your boat definitely does not have it.

> > Nice comercial Mark :-)

> A good idea is a good idea no matter who does it.

You are right did not mean that it was not a good idea. CC would not have
copied it if it was not :-)

Quote:
> BTW, I really like the new adjustable ballast/trim system to compensate
for
> passenger weight on the new MasterCrafts.    I'd love to have such a thing
on my
> SN, we would use it alot.

> Anything that helps the driver give the skier a better pull is a good idea
in my
> book.

> There, now we're even.

Yep! this would be very valuable in a tournamnet barefoot boat to make the
wake perfect sometimes you need to move people around in the boat to make
the wake right. With a few judges it would be very nice to add alittle extra
weigfht to counter act a crew that might not have missed many meals.

--
Kevin R. Baugh

http://www.ezl.com/~krbaugh
http://www.ezl.com/~krbaugh/carla

Quote:

> Mark Lenox

 
 
 

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by Kevin R Baug » Wed, 29 Sep 1999 04:00:00

I think Tom was referring to the ruder adjustment.

--
Kevin R. Baugh

http://www.ezl.com/~krbaugh
http://www.ezl.com/~krbaugh/carla

Quote:
> I think American Skier did it first (or announced it first), but
Mastercraft
> has the "passenger"-simulator as well now.

> Bill




> > ...
> > >> Nice comercial Mark :-)

> > >A good idea is a good idea no matter who does it.

> > Wasn't it from American Skier? (Ron Tanis)

> > >BTW, I really like the new adjustable ballast/trim system to compensate
> for
> > >passenger weight on the new MasterCrafts.    I'd love to have such a
> thing on my
> > >SN, we would use it alot.

> > I use a 10 gallon flexible water container in my canoe to
> > compensate for my much lighter young son.  Maybe that'd
> > work?

> > Tom

 
 
 

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by Mark Leno » Thu, 30 Sep 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

> >BTW, I really like the new adjustable ballast/trim system to compensate for
> >passenger weight on the new MasterCrafts.    I'd love to have such a thing on my
> >SN, we would use it alot.

> I use a 10 gallon flexible water container in my canoe to
> compensate for my much lighter young son.  Maybe that'd
> work?

I use a nylon duffel bag with 50 pounds of lead shot in it to trim the boat just
so.   It won't totally compensate for the driver if there are no passengers, but it's
pretty close.   With passengers, sometimes it ends up clear behind the driver.    The
lead shot works pretty well as it kindof spreads out and doesn't move around.   Plus,
it's alot smaller than 10 gallons of water.

75 pounds of lead on a linear bearing underneath the front seats (under the floor?),
such that it could move nearly beam to beam would be pretty great.   A powered drive
with a switch on the dash to move it left/right would be even better.   Not sure how
the MasterCraft version works.   Anybody know?   Water tank with pump maybe?

Mark Lenox

 
 
 

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by Kevin R Baug » Thu, 30 Sep 1999 04:00:00

It is a fat sack that fills from a pump with plumbing that will fill and
empty. When it is empty it is flat and takes up no space. A larger version
is in the floor storage of the Xstar.  Very nice

--
Kevin R. Baugh

http://www.ezl.com/~krbaugh
http://www.ezl.com/~krbaugh/carla

Quote:


> > >BTW, I really like the new adjustable ballast/trim system to compensate
for
> > >passenger weight on the new MasterCrafts.    I'd love to have such a
thing on my
> > >SN, we would use it alot.

> > I use a 10 gallon flexible water container in my canoe to
> > compensate for my much lighter young son.  Maybe that'd
> > work?

> I use a nylon duffel bag with 50 pounds of lead shot in it to trim the
boat just
> so.   It won't totally compensate for the driver if there are no

passengers, but it's

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> pretty close.   With passengers, sometimes it ends up clear behind the
driver.    The
> lead shot works pretty well as it kindof spreads out and doesn't move
around.   Plus,
> it's alot smaller than 10 gallons of water.

> 75 pounds of lead on a linear bearing underneath the front seats (under
the floor?),
> such that it could move nearly beam to beam would be pretty great.   A
powered drive
> with a switch on the dash to move it left/right would be even better.
Not sure how
> the MasterCraft version works.   Anybody know?   Water tank with pump
maybe?

> Mark Lenox

 
 
 

Help my 190 dives to the right

Post by Kevin R Baug » Thu, 30 Sep 1999 04:00:00

Quote:
> How durable is it?

Looks very durable. Time will tell

Quote:
> If it is a bladder, will it burst if you drop something
> on it?

Drop what on it. I am sure you can break anything if you drop the wrong
thing on it. Go to your local MC dealer and check it out. It looks like a
great idea to me.
Quote:

> Bill



> > It is a fat sack that fills from a pump with plumbing that will fill and
> > empty. When it is empty it is flat and takes up no space. A larger
version
> > is in the floor storage of the Xstar.  Very nice

> > --
> > Kevin R. Baugh

> > http://www.ezl.com/~krbaugh
> > http://www.ezl.com/~krbaugh/carla



> > > > >BTW, I really like the new adjustable ballast/trim system to
> compensate
> > for
> > > > >passenger weight on the new MasterCrafts.    I'd love to have such
a
> > thing on my
> > > > >SN, we would use it alot.

> > > > I use a 10 gallon flexible water container in my canoe to
> > > > compensate for my much lighter young son.  Maybe that'd
> > > > work?

> > > I use a nylon duffel bag with 50 pounds of lead shot in it to trim the
> > boat just
> > > so.   It won't totally compensate for the driver if there are no
> > passengers, but it's
> > > pretty close.   With passengers, sometimes it ends up clear behind the
> > driver.    The
> > > lead shot works pretty well as it kindof spreads out and doesn't move
> > around.   Plus,
> > > it's alot smaller than 10 gallons of water.

> > > 75 pounds of lead on a linear bearing underneath the front seats
(under
> > the floor?),
> > > such that it could move nearly beam to beam would be pretty great.   A
> > powered drive
> > > with a switch on the dash to move it left/right would be even better.
> > Not sure how
> > > the MasterCraft version works.   Anybody know?   Water tank with pump
> > maybe?

> > > Mark Lenox