Trouble edging through the wake

Trouble edging through the wake

Post by Top Jimm » Mon, 01 Nov 1999 03:00:00


It seems that no matter how hard I "dig in", I cannot smoothly edge through
the wake, I always "pop" over, catching a little bit of air.  What can I do
to change this as far as technique, or is this purely a function of the
skier friendliness of the wake, or my ski?  Is it possible I need a shorter
ski, or one with a more radical design?  Right now, I ski on a Connelly
Revolution, which is 65 inches, and I weigh 102 lbs.  Thanks for the help!

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Trouble edging through the wake

Post by Mark Kovalcso » Tue, 02 Nov 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

> It seems that no matter how hard I "dig in", I cannot smoothly edge through the wake, I always "pop" over, catching a little bit of air.  What can I do to change this as far as technique, or is this purely a function of the skier friendliness of the wake, or my ski?  Is it possible I need a shorter ski, or one with a more radical design?  Right now, I ski on a Connelly Revolution, which is 65 inches, and I weigh 102 lbs.  Thanks for the help!

It can be caused by technique or a large wake. From what I can see
working with a friend this year cutting through the wake on the offside
comes in stages.

1. Tail deep, but leaning back on the ski. This doesn't give you the
accelleration you get with more ski in the water, but it is less scary
and there is less chance of a header when you are that far back.

2. A more level pull but still a rigid position possibly because the
skier is still scared of the offside pull with the nose of the ski down
further.

3. Finally a more fluid pull with the ski being pushed if front of the
skier at the wake.

You might want a smaller ski depending on the speed you are going. You
might want to use that extra lift and drop your speed a bit while you
work on this. If you don't feel like you are plowing the water you will
probably feel a lot safer and be willing to lean over further. Also the
slower speeds makes the falls much less scary.

--

Mark Kovalcson
http://www.perfectpull.com
Waterski Training Equipment

 
 
 

Trouble edging through the wake

Post by Bob Scibiens » Tue, 02 Nov 1999 04:00:00

I do not recall having ever seen a skier of any level of competence who did not
get some "air time" off the wake at 15 through 28 off (although 22 is generally
the worse).  The key is to not let it get into your head.  If you are centered
on your ski and not being thrown forward when you cut through the wake then you
should be alright.  That said, 102 lb. on a 65 in. ski sounds a little light,
and you may be getting more air time than you should.  You should strive for the
hit to be closer to a pop than a flight.  The quicker you get your ski back in
the water the better.  Also, it is quite common for skiers to think that they
are staying down against the pull when in reality they begin to let up just as
they approach the wake.  This invariably leads to increased air time.  A
knowledgeble observer is invaluable here.

Good luck -

Bob

Quote:

>It seems that no matter how hard I "dig in", I cannot smoothly edge through
>the wake, I always "pop" over, catching a little bit of air.  What can I do
>to change this as far as technique, or is this purely a function of the
>skier friendliness of the wake, or my ski?  Is it possible I need a shorter
>ski, or one with a more radical design?  Right now, I ski on a Connelly
>Revolution, which is 65 inches, and I weigh 102 lbs.  Thanks for the help!
>------------------------------------------------------------------
>Top Jimmy - http://members.home.com/cdboy
>Fight Spam! Join CAUCE! == http://www.cauce.org/
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Trouble edging through the wake

Post by Vern Reev » Wed, 03 Nov 1999 04:00:00

That's true, most people do let up right at the wake and that makes
them get some air.  What seems to have helped me the most was 1. to
bend my knees (which gave me more angle and I could absorb the wake
easier),  2. look across the wake at the far shore line (which helped
me to forget the wake was there, 3. keep my back straight, chest out,
and elbows on my vest, and 4. to try to lean far enough that my
shoulders would touch the second wake  (this is impossible for me to
do, but it sure helps me to focus on edging through both wakes).  


Quote:

>I do not recall having ever seen a skier of any level of competence who did not
>get some "air time" off the wake at 15 through 28 off (although 22 is generally
>the worse).  The key is to not let it get into your head.  If you are centered
>on your ski and not being thrown forward when you cut through the wake then you
>should be alright.  That said, 102 lb. on a 65 in. ski sounds a little light,
>and you may be getting more air time than you should.  You should strive for the
>hit to be closer to a pop than a flight.  The quicker you get your ski back in
>the water the better.  Also, it is quite common for skiers to think that they
>are staying down against the pull when in reality they begin to let up just as
>they approach the wake.  This invariably leads to increased air time.  A
>knowledgeble observer is invaluable here.

>Good luck -

>Bob


>>It seems that no matter how hard I "dig in", I cannot smoothly edge through
>>the wake, I always "pop" over, catching a little bit of air.  What can I do
>>to change this as far as technique, or is this purely a function of the
>>skier friendliness of the wake, or my ski?  Is it possible I need a shorter
>>ski, or one with a more radical design?  Right now, I ski on a Connelly
>>Revolution, which is 65 inches, and I weigh 102 lbs.  Thanks for the help!

>>------------------------------------------------------------------
>>Top Jimmy - http://members.home.com/cdboy
>>Fight Spam! Join CAUCE! == http://www.cauce.org/
>>------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Trouble edging through the wake

Post by Philip Pointe » Thu, 11 Nov 1999 04:00:00

All good posts.  I might add that you must bend your knees.   Then bend them a
little more.  A chair position works best for me.  Also, your arms should be as
relaxed and straight as possible.  Next, I try to hide my outside shoulder from
the boat, which helps with my body positioning.  By "hide", what I mean is that
I tend to lean a little further from the pull when I focus the outside shoulder
down and away from the boat.   And as another poster said, try not to let up
when you get to the wakes.

Think about having someone video tape your passes.  I'm always amazed at the
problems I see in a video of my skiing.

Quote:

> It seems that no matter how hard I "dig in", I cannot smoothly edge through
> the wake, I always "pop" over, catching a little bit of air.  What can I do
> to change this as far as technique, or is this purely a function of the
> skier friendliness of the wake, or my ski?  Is it possible I need a shorter
> ski, or one with a more radical design?  Right now, I ski on a Connelly
> Revolution, which is 65 inches, and I weigh 102 lbs.  Thanks for the help!

> ------------------------------------------------------------------
> Top Jimmy - http://members.home.com/cdboy
> Fight Spam! Join CAUCE! == http://www.cauce.org/
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