Need help starting with two feet in (Slalom)

Need help starting with two feet in (Slalom)

Post by cptpoofac » Tue, 30 May 2006 14:54:44


I am an advanced skiier, but I have a major problem.  I learned to
start with one foot in the binding and the other out.  I always had a
front binding and a rear tow plate.  When I would start I would keep
myself stable in the water using my rear foot.  Then once I said hit
it, I would lean way forward and my rear foot would be behind me and up
in the air.  I would then slip my rear foot into the toe plate once I
planed.  Last year I bought a ski with a front and rear binding, so now
I have to start with both feet in the bindings.  I can't believe how
much better I ski when I have two bindings.  I can cut harder, and
faster, and I have a lot more fun.  The problem is that it always seems
to take me three, four or even five tries to get up.  Once I get up I
am fine, but I need to learn how to get up on my first try.  When I
start out I always seem to be drifting to one side or the other, or
falling over sideways.  To counter this I lean the ski on the rope.
When I do successfully get up, I just seem to pop right up, I don't
know what I am doing different but it just seems effortless.  When I am
not successful it seems I either bury the tip, or, more frequently, the
ski will veer to the left or right and take me with it causing me to
fall over sideways.  I have tried everything I can think of and I can't
seem to get a handle on this.  I know this is really hard to understand
and hard to explain, but if anyone has had this problem themselves or
if you have any tips you think would help please share them with me.  I
also need a little help with the slalom course.  I live at a lake for
two months out of the summer, and I can cut harder than just about
anybody on the lake.  But four or five people can go through the slalom
course with no problems, while I can't even get past the second bouy.
I go through the entrance bouys and get around the first bouy fine, but
I can never seem to get across to the second bouy in time.  The only
thing I can think of is that I might be pulled at too high a speed.  I
usually get towed anywhere from 36-40 mph.  Is that too fast for the
slalom course?  I have never had a teacher or instructor so I have had
to figure out everything on my own, so you might want to keep that in
mind as I probably won't understand any of the lingo or terms you might
use.  Thanks for any help you can give me.
 
 
 

Need help starting with two feet in (Slalom)

Post by John » Tue, 30 May 2006 17:45:54

Quote:

> I am an advanced skiier, but I have a major problem.  I learned to
> start with one foot in the binding and the other out.  I always had a
> front binding and a rear tow plate.  When I would start I would keep
> myself stable in the water using my rear foot.  Then once I said hit
> it, I would lean way forward and my rear foot would be behind me and up
> in the air.  I would then slip my rear foot into the toe plate once I
> planed.  Last year I bought a ski with a front and rear binding, so now
> I have to start with both feet in the bindings.  I can't believe how
> much better I ski when I have two bindings.  I can cut harder, and
> faster, and I have a lot more fun.  The problem is that it always seems
> to take me three, four or even five tries to get up.  Once I get up I
> am fine, but I need to learn how to get up on my first try.  When I
> start out I always seem to be drifting to one side or the other, or
> falling over sideways.  To counter this I lean the ski on the rope.
> When I do successfully get up, I just seem to pop right up, I don't
> know what I am doing different but it just seems effortless.  When I am
> not successful it seems I either bury the tip, or, more frequently, the
> ski will veer to the left or right and take me with it causing me to
> fall over sideways.  I have tried everything I can think of and I can't
> seem to get a handle on this.  I know this is really hard to understand
> and hard to explain, but if anyone has had this problem themselves or
> if you have any tips you think would help please share them with me.  I
> also need a little help with the slalom course.  I live at a lake for
> two months out of the summer, and I can cut harder than just about
> anybody on the lake.  But four or five people can go through the slalom
> course with no problems, while I can't even get past the second bouy.
> I go through the entrance bouys and get around the first bouy fine, but
> I can never seem to get across to the second bouy in time.  The only
> thing I can think of is that I might be pulled at too high a speed.  I
> usually get towed anywhere from 36-40 mph.  Is that too fast for the
> slalom course?  I have never had a teacher or instructor so I have had
> to figure out everything on my own, so you might want to keep that in
> mind as I probably won't understand any of the lingo or terms you might
> use.  Thanks for any help you can give me.

I find if I fall over on my left side in the start, that I can just
hold on and the ski will straighten me up. You just gotta hunker down.
If I fall over to the right, its all over so I just make sure I don't
do that. Other than that its just a matter of scrunch up into a little
ball and let the boat do its thing.

 
 
 

Need help starting with two feet in (Slalom)

Post by One of the Pfankuch' » Tue, 30 May 2006 22:34:15

Slow the boat down to 30 to 32 mph.  I doubt that most people can run the
course at 40 mph.

Best bet is to find a good slalom ski instructor or ski school.  The money
will be well spent!  They can help you improve much more quickly in person.
Hard to tell what you are doing wrong without seeing it.

Pete

 
 
 

Need help starting with two feet in (Slalom)

Post by Gregory McGuir » Wed, 31 May 2006 03:46:16

Ok I bite :)
I have always been a 2 feet in bindings skier, rear toe style binding.
I think that the problem that I had, was that before I yell hit it,
make sure that I have the top 3rd of the slalom ski above water,
and ski angled something like 45 or greater. I can get up in like 10
to 15 feet, if I remember correctly. Boat is 1975 bayliner
mutiny, powered by 90 HP outboard .  I am 6'3" 170Lbs, I am on
a 68" ski.
If you are burrying the tip and falling, try keeping the top 3rd of the
waterski above water and angled like I do.
This weaving side to side thing is happening because, your still not
on top of the water yet. Water is splashing you in the face, you loose
your balance and fall.
Keeping the tip out of the water and ski angle prior to hitting it, helps
the
ski to plane on the water faster and in a natural way.

You wrote, your skiing a slalom course at up to 40 Mph, no comment.


Quote:
>I am an advanced skiier, but I have a major problem.  I learned to
> start with one foot in the binding and the other out.  I always had a
> front binding and a rear tow plate.  When I would start I would keep
> myself stable in the water using my rear foot.  Then once I said hit
> it, I would lean way forward and my rear foot would be behind me and up
> in the air.  I would then slip my rear foot into the toe plate once I
> planed.  Last year I bought a ski with a front and rear binding, so now
> I have to start with both feet in the bindings.  I can't believe how
> much better I ski when I have two bindings.  I can cut harder, and
> faster, and I have a lot more fun.  The problem is that it always seems
> to take me three, four or even five tries to get up.  Once I get up I
> am fine, but I need to learn how to get up on my first try.  When I
> start out I always seem to be drifting to one side or the other, or
> falling over sideways.  To counter this I lean the ski on the rope.
> When I do successfully get up, I just seem to pop right up, I don't
> know what I am doing different but it just seems effortless.  When I am
> not successful it seems I either bury the tip, or, more frequently, the
> ski will veer to the left or right and take me with it causing me to
> fall over sideways.  I have tried everything I can think of and I can't
> seem to get a handle on this.  I know this is really hard to understand
> and hard to explain, but if anyone has had this problem themselves or
> if you have any tips you think would help please share them with me.  I
> also need a little help with the slalom course.  I live at a lake for
> two months out of the summer, and I can cut harder than just about
> anybody on the lake.  But four or five people can go through the slalom
> course with no problems, while I can't even get past the second bouy.
> I go through the entrance bouys and get around the first bouy fine, but
> I can never seem to get across to the second bouy in time.  The only
> thing I can think of is that I might be pulled at too high a speed.  I
> usually get towed anywhere from 36-40 mph.  Is that too fast for the
> slalom course?  I have never had a teacher or instructor so I have had
> to figure out everything on my own, so you might want to keep that in
> mind as I probably won't understand any of the lingo or terms you might
> use.  Thanks for any help you can give me.

 
 
 

Need help starting with two feet in (Slalom)

Post by K. Enge » Wed, 31 May 2006 04:25:57

Hi,

I too used to slalom with a rear toe loop, and I struggled to maintain my
balance until I watched Jaret Llewellyn's new DVD.  If you ski left foot
forward as I do, just let the ski rest comfortably tilted off to the left
side.  You will find this position WAY easier to balance.  Once you start to
feel the pull of the boat, slowly straighten your ski and away you go.

Jaret explains it way better than I do in his video "Step In the Right
Direction".  I purchased it off of ridingh2o.com and it arrived very
quickly.  Here's the website if you are interested:
http://www.ridingh2o.com/

Try slowing down your speed to 32 to 34 MPH, but if you are in Alberta stop
by and see Ken Nelson at Shalom Lake.  He'll get you around all six by the
end of summer guaranteed.  www.shalompark.com

Happy skiing.

Kevin


Quote:
>I am an advanced skiier, but I have a major problem.  I learned to
> start with one foot in the binding and the other out.  I always had a
> front binding and a rear tow plate.  When I would start I would keep
> myself stable in the water using my rear foot.  Then once I said hit
> it, I would lean way forward and my rear foot would be behind me and up
> in the air.  I would then slip my rear foot into the toe plate once I
> planed.  Last year I bought a ski with a front and rear binding, so now
> I have to start with both feet in the bindings.  I can't believe how
> much better I ski when I have two bindings.  I can cut harder, and
> faster, and I have a lot more fun.  The problem is that it always seems
> to take me three, four or even five tries to get up.  Once I get up I
> am fine, but I need to learn how to get up on my first try.  When I
> start out I always seem to be drifting to one side or the other, or
> falling over sideways.  To counter this I lean the ski on the rope.
> When I do successfully get up, I just seem to pop right up, I don't
> know what I am doing different but it just seems effortless.  When I am
> not successful it seems I either bury the tip, or, more frequently, the
> ski will veer to the left or right and take me with it causing me to
> fall over sideways.  I have tried everything I can think of and I can't
> seem to get a handle on this.  I know this is really hard to understand
> and hard to explain, but if anyone has had this problem themselves or
> if you have any tips you think would help please share them with me.  I
> also need a little help with the slalom course.  I live at a lake for
> two months out of the summer, and I can cut harder than just about
> anybody on the lake.  But four or five people can go through the slalom
> course with no problems, while I can't even get past the second bouy.
> I go through the entrance bouys and get around the first bouy fine, but
> I can never seem to get across to the second bouy in time.  The only
> thing I can think of is that I might be pulled at too high a speed.  I
> usually get towed anywhere from 36-40 mph.  Is that too fast for the
> slalom course?  I have never had a teacher or instructor so I have had
> to figure out everything on my own, so you might want to keep that in
> mind as I probably won't understand any of the lingo or terms you might
> use.  Thanks for any help you can give me.

 
 
 

Need help starting with two feet in (Slalom)

Post by Bo » Wed, 31 May 2006 07:13:28

On 28 May 2006 22:54:44 -0700 "cptpooface"

Quote:

>I am an advanced skiier, but I have a major problem.  I learned to
>start with one foot in the binding and the other out.  I always had a
>front binding and a rear tow plate.  When I would start I would keep
>myself stable in the water using my rear foot.  Then once I said hit
>it, I would lean way forward and my rear foot would be behind me and up
>in the air.  I would then slip my rear foot into the toe plate once I
>planed.  Last year I bought a ski with a front and rear binding, so now
>I have to start with both feet in the bindings.  I can't believe how
>much better I ski when I have two bindings.  I can cut harder, and

I'm pretty much a rank amateur so I learned my two foot starts
relatively recently.  What helped me a lot was to think about keeping
a bunch of the ski out of the water prior to the start.  Someone else
has posted 1/3 out of the water - I would say closer to 1/2 of the ski
should be out of the water.  Make sure your lifevest is floating you
high enough so you can do this.  And if you are used to leaning
forward on the start you are going to have to unlearn that habit.  You
need to be way back and let the pull slowly roll you up -- don't be in
a big hurry to stand up.  Stay low in a ball.  People make a big deal
about which side of the rope your ski needs to be on when you start.
My instructor told me "if the ski wants to go left everytime you start
then put the rope to the left of the ski" and vice versa.  I can't
remember which side I put it on - I'll know when I get in the water.

Quote:
>usually get towed anywhere from 36-40 mph.  Is that too fast for the
>slalom course?  I have never had a teacher or instructor so I have had
>to figure out everything on my own, so you might want to keep that in
>mind as I probably won't understand any of the lingo or terms you might
>use.  Thanks for any help you can give me.

If you are starting out in the course at "36-40 mph" you are doing
well.  Try starting around 30 and keep slowing down until you can make
the pass. Then speed up.  The pros run at 36 or 34 so you probably
don't need to go any faster than that.

--
R.J.(Bob) Evans
(return address needs alteration to work)

 
 
 

Need help starting with two feet in (Slalom)

Post by cptpoofac » Wed, 31 May 2006 11:36:29

Just to clear up a mistake, Someone quoted me as saying I skiied the
slalom course at 40 mph, thats not true.  What I actually meant was
that I ski out in the open at 36-40 I tried to ski the slalom course at
that speed and failed miserably.  I am not trying to brag or anything,
I can't even run the slalom course yet, let alone at 40mph (from what
everyone said that is way to fast).  I start with my right foot
forward, and I can't remember which side I put the rope on.  I won't be
skiing for another month so I can't try this stuff until then, but I
will print out all the tips and hopefully I be able to get up with no
problems.  Thanks everyone.
 
 
 

Need help starting with two feet in (Slalom)

Post by Gregory McGuir » Wed, 31 May 2006 14:16:06

I put the rope on the right side, I'm right foot forward.
I'm in California, what state are you in.
greg

Quote:
> Just to clear up a mistake, Someone quoted me as saying I skiied the
> slalom course at 40 mph, thats not true.  What I actually meant was
> that I ski out in the open at 36-40 I tried to ski the slalom course at
> that speed and failed miserably.  I am not trying to brag or anything,
> I can't even run the slalom course yet, let alone at 40mph (from what
> everyone said that is way to fast).  I start with my right foot
> forward, and I can't remember which side I put the rope on.  I won't be
> skiing for another month so I can't try this stuff until then, but I
> will print out all the tips and hopefully I be able to get up with no
> problems.  Thanks everyone.

 
 
 

Need help starting with two feet in (Slalom)

Post by mswlog » Fri, 09 Jun 2006 04:33:47

One of those deep V starter handles might help keep the tip straight.
I don't require it to get up, but it speeds things up and allows for a
sloppy start going smoother.

Also try dragging the boat in gear just for tad, the rope should be
pretty tight. A really good strong skier can handle more slack and a
bad angle on the boat. Then say hit it. Usually driver has to go in and
out of gear because dragging in gear is often too fast. Also boat and
rudder should be straight before you hit it (good driver knows the boat
is set up right). Any turn at all by the boat at start will result in a
weaker start. That's why dragging helps, it assures everything is
straight and tight. If you do, you'll pop up pretty fast and save
energy for skiing.

A good driver helps too.

P.S. Your tempting me to get a rear full boot though.

Quote:

> I put the rope on the right side, I'm right foot forward.
> I'm in California, what state are you in.
> greg


> > Just to clear up a mistake, Someone quoted me as saying I skiied the
> > slalom course at 40 mph, thats not true.  What I actually meant was
> > that I ski out in the open at 36-40 I tried to ski the slalom course at
> > that speed and failed miserably.  I am not trying to brag or anything,
> > I can't even run the slalom course yet, let alone at 40mph (from what
> > everyone said that is way to fast).  I start with my right foot
> > forward, and I can't remember which side I put the rope on.  I won't be
> > skiing for another month so I can't try this stuff until then, but I
> > will print out all the tips and hopefully I be able to get up with no
> > problems.  Thanks everyone.

 
 
 

Need help starting with two feet in (Slalom)

Post by e.. » Wed, 14 Jun 2006 05:38:50

It's been a long time since I slalomed a lot, but when I was still
figuring out how to start consistently with two feet in the bindings, I
eventually found that I wasn't putting enough weight on the front foot.
For some reason, having that left foot in the binding in the back makes
for a temptation to just stomp on it, and the ski gets really
squirelly. Relaxing that back foot as much as possible, start with the
ski relatively high, and focus all your weight on the front foot and
the ski should stabilize just fine.

I've started 2 feet in the ski behind a 50hp evinrude outboard, so I
can verify it IS possible to drag stably for a long time with both feet
in =P

Hope this helps!