Why am I sick???

Why am I sick???

Post by Lissa Leigh Kenne » Wed, 11 May 1994 06:59:52


Arrgh! I'm getting desperate and figured the best place to turn for advice
is here.
Before 8 weeks ago my workouts consisted of an hour of aerobics three times
a week. When I decided to do a sprint distance triathlon this summer, I
started  running or swimming about an hour five times a week. I've also
been keeping track of what I eat, cutting out meat and limiting dairy
products, keeping fat to about 20% of caloric intake. So with all this
effort, why is it that I have gotten sick four times in the past two
months? Three of them were only slight colds, but one was a ten day douzy
that didn't respond to antibiotics or anything. Normally I get maybe two
colds per year, usually in the fall or winter.
I've been vegetarian with no ill effects on and off for the past five
years, so I don't want to think it's lack of protein or anything like that.
The only other explanantions I can think of are not enough sleep (Do you
need more sleep when you train more?) or stress (but that's a constant in
my life :/ ).

Has anyone else had this problem? Any guesses as to what it might be?

This has been somewhat demoralizing and any advice or similar anecdotes
would be much appreciated.

Thanks,
Lissa Kennedy

 
 
 

Why am I sick???

Post by Johan Svenss » Wed, 11 May 1994 17:03:22


Quote:
>Arrgh! I'm getting desperate and figured the best place to turn for advice
>is here.
>Before 8 weeks ago my workouts consisted of an hour of aerobics three times
>a week. When I decided to do a sprint distance triathlon this summer, I
>started  running or swimming about an hour five times a week. I've also
>been keeping track of what I eat, cutting out meat and limiting dairy
>products, keeping fat to about 20% of caloric intake. So with all this
>effort, why is it that I have gotten sick four times in the past two
>months? Three of them were only slight colds, but one was a ten day douzy
>that didn't respond to antibiotics or anything. Normally I get maybe two
>colds per year, usually in the fall or winter.
>I've been vegetarian with no ill effects on and off for the past five
>years, so I don't want to think it's lack of protein or anything like that.
>The only other explanantions I can think of are not enough sleep (Do you
>need more sleep when you train more?) or stress (but that's a constant in
>my life :/ ).

You definitely need more sleep (or rest anyway) if you increase your
traning rate. I'm no nutrition or medical expert but you have to increase
most of what you're eating as well. Generally, it's better to eat many
different things than much of a few. As an example, Kjell-Erik St?hl (a
veteran long distance runner from Sweden) had heart-problems during three
years because he lacked a few vital minerals in his system. When he (with
the help of experts) found out about this and corrected it, he ran as
wind again.

Quote:

>Has anyone else had this problem? Any guesses as to what it might be?

>This has been somewhat demoralizing and any advice or similar anecdotes
>would be much appreciated.

I hope an expert fills in here.. :-)

Quote:

>Thanks,
>Lissa Kennedy

____________________________________________________________

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Why am I sick???

Post by Jame » Thu, 12 May 1994 02:44:33


Quote:
>a week. When I decided to do a sprint distance triathlon this summer, I
>started  running or swimming about an hour five times a week. I've also
>been keeping track of what I eat, cutting out meat and limiting dairy
>products, keeping fat to about 20% of caloric intake. So with all this
>effort, why is it that I have gotten sick four times in the past two
>months? Three of them were only slight colds, but one was a ten day douzy
>that didn't respond to antibiotics or anything. Normally I get maybe two
>colds per year, usually in the fall or winter.
>Has anyone else had this problem? Any guesses as to what it might be?

If you have cold-like symptoms, i.e. green snot, it could be a sinus infection.
This in turn may have been the result of swimming in a pool.  The chlorine
from the pool tends to inflame your sinuses and upset the mucous lining.
This could lead to secondary infections.   I went through a similar incident
last summer.



 
 
 

Why am I sick???

Post by Michael Bradsh » Thu, 12 May 1994 08:49:42



Quote:
> The only other explanantions I can think of are not enough sleep (Do you
> need more sleep when you train more?) or stress (but that's a constant in
> my life :/ ).

Well, I definitely need more sleep when I train - up to 10-12 hrs if I'm
training VERY hard. One of the classic signs of overtraining is getting
sick. Try cutting back on your training for a while, and then follow the
10% rule - don't increase more than 10% each week, and every fourth week
don't increase at all. Hope this helps...

Mike

 
 
 

Why am I sick???

Post by Paul Gatk » Thu, 12 May 1994 09:02:11


Quote:


>> The only other explanantions I can think of are not enough sleep (Do you
>> need more sleep when you train more?) or stress (but that's a constant in
>> my life :/ ).
>Well, I definitely need more sleep when I train - up to 10-12 hrs if I'm
>training VERY hard. One of the classic signs of overtraining is getting
>sick. Try cutting back on your training for a while, and then follow the
>10% rule - don't increase more than 10% each week, and every fourth week
>don't increase at all. Hope this helps...
>Mike

 Good advice. But on the fourth week, instead of maintaining the increased
workload of 10% per week increases, I like to cut back from the previous hard
week to about 70%. This allows for a really good recovery. Then start building
up the time for the next 3 weeks, and cut back on the fourth again. It's called
periodization.


 
 
 

Why am I sick???

Post by James Nonnemach » Thu, 12 May 1994 22:08:42


|> Arrgh! I'm getting desperate and figured the best place to turn for advice
|> is here.
|> Before 8 weeks ago my workouts consisted of an hour of aerobics three times
|> a week. When I decided to do a sprint distance triathlon this summer, I
|> started  running or swimming about an hour five times a week. I've also
|> been keeping track of what I eat, cutting out meat and limiting dairy
|> products, keeping fat to about 20% of caloric intake. So with all this
|> effort, why is it that I have gotten sick four times in the past two
|> months? Three of them were only slight colds, but one was a ten day douzy
|> that didn't respond to antibiotics or anything. Normally I get maybe two
|> colds per year, usually in the fall or winter.
|> I've been vegetarian with no ill effects on and off for the past five
|> years, so I don't want to think it's lack of protein or anything like that.
|> The only other explanantions I can think of are not enough sleep (Do you
|> need more sleep when you train more?) or stress (but that's a constant in
|> my life :/ ).
|>
|> Has anyone else had this problem? Any guesses as to what it might be?
|>
|> This has been somewhat demoralizing and any advice or similar anecdotes
|> would be much appreciated.
|>
|> Thanks,
|> Lissa Kennedy

I'm no expert on this but my guess is you're overtraining.

To start with, you might want to look at your training log. You say you
were doing an hour of aerobics 3X/wk -- for how long were you doing this?
Was this a  long term workout schedule or have you been doing this for only
a few months? While on this schedule, how many hours of sleep were you
getting and how much were you eating? Can you compare how you felt then as to
how you feel now? If there are significant negative changes it's another
indication of possible overtraining.

If the increase in activity was a significant increase in your "work load"
then you may have been putting too much stress on your body to quickly. By
maintaining this new, high level of stress and not allowing your body
to recover between workouts, your immune system could have been depressed.

It may be wise to:

1) take a week off from any "heavy" workouts and just do very light
   workouts -- ones that seem embrassingly easy.

2) once you get back to hard workouts, try doing hard day / easy day
   schedules.

3) you might want to consider getting a heart rate monitor -- if you're
   really serious about your training -- so that you KNOW at what
   intensity you're working at.

4) try reading a few books like, " The Herat Rate Monitor Book," or
   "Serious Training for Serious Athletes."

 
 
 

Why am I sick???

Post by Sue Rais » Fri, 13 May 1994 01:59:43


Quote:
>Arrgh! I'm getting desperate and figured the best place to turn for advice
>is here.
>Before 8 weeks ago my workouts consisted of an hour of aerobics three times
>a week. When I decided to do a sprint distance triathlon this summer, I
>started  running or swimming about an hour five times a week. I've also
>been keeping track of what I eat, cutting out meat and limiting dairy
>products, keeping fat to about 20% of caloric intake. So with all this
>effort, why is it that I have gotten sick four times in the past two
>months? Three of them were only slight colds, but one was a ten day douzy
>that didn't respond to antibiotics or anything. Normally I get maybe two
>colds per year, usually in the fall or winter.
>I've been vegetarian with no ill effects on and off for the past five
>years, so I don't want to think it's lack of protein or anything like that.
>The only other explanantions I can think of are not enough sleep (Do you
>need more sleep when you train more?) or stress (but that's a constant in
>my life :/ ).

I've had a similar experience.  Back in Jan-Feb I was training well
and had built up a good base for my half-ironman goal this summer.
Then at the beginning of March I got a respiratory infection that
knocked me out for 2 weeks.  As soon as I though I'd recovered, I'd
start working out again (nothing too insane and far less than I had
before being sick).  Then I'd get sick again - coughing, can't
breathe, runny nose, etc... This has gone on for the past month and a
half.

After four visits to the doctor in the past 2.5 months, she's
diagnosed me with asthma.  She said the original respiratory infection
triggered it and basically irritated my system so much that everytime
I exercise my system attacks itself.  Or something like that.  (I
really don't know what asthma is, except that at age 23 its a little
late to be diagnosed with it.)  So now I have an inhaler and am
officially "taking time off" trying to wait for this thing to clear up
completely.

It is so hard to take time off though.  Knowing all the fitness I had
built up is fading away.  And also that I'm getting fatter because my
triathlete-sized appetite has remained.

Quote:
>Has anyone else had this problem? Any guesses as to what it might be?

It's probably not the same as my case (asthma) but maybe its
Allergies?  You might be spending a lot more time working-out outside
than you have in the past... With me, allergy attacks are
indistinguishable from colds, and sometimes enough gunk from my nose
runs into my chest to give me bronchitis from it.  If its allergies
you might be able to get some allergy shots, and it will definitely
help you to know exactly what you are allergic to.

Quote:
>This has been somewhat demoralizing and any advice or similar anecdotes
>would be much appreciated.

Tell me about it. :(  [complain mode off]

Quote:
>Thanks,
>Lissa Kennedy

--
Susan Raisty                    |  Applications Engineer


 
 
 

Why am I sick???

Post by Jeff Orcha » Sat, 14 May 1994 08:57:48

I was at a talk for triathlon training not long ago.  Barry
Sheapley (the coach of the Canadian Tri Team) said that a
good way to "listen" to your body's physical stress is to
take your heart rate every morning, just as you wake up.
From that you can calculate your average resting heart rate.
He said that  if your resting heart rate is more than 5
beats per minute above your average, then you should take it
easy that day.  Of course, you also have to take into account
things like drinking the night before and other things that
"artificially" raise your heart rate.

He also mentioned a few times that many people overtrain.
He said that you shouldn't do any really long sessions for
about two weeks before a race.  Just intense, short ones.

Another thing I learned in nutrition is that runners require
a little more iron because the pounding tends to destroy
red *** cells.

Jeff Orchard