IT Band Syndrome. . .PLEASE HELP. . .Very Desparate

IT Band Syndrome. . .PLEASE HELP. . .Very Desparate

Post by BeFit4Li » Wed, 02 Oct 1996 04:00:00


I am hoping that someone out there may have a solution to IT band
syndrome.  I am a fairly competitive triathlete who has been experiencing
extreme pain around the lateral side of my knee where the IT band inserts
into the femur and fibula.  I was unsure at first that this was my
problem, but after seeing several people including an orthopeadic, we had
all come to the concludsion that the myelin sheath of the illiotibial band
is rubbing against my femur.  

I literally have tried everything. . . . . . except surgery :(   I
probably don't ice massage as much as I should but I have without a doubt
rested  throughly.  In the past 6-8 months since the problem I had taken
4-6 weeks off at a time from running. . .  . . But no success. . . the
pain keeps returning about 5 miles into the run. . It is extremely hard to
localize exactly where the pain is coming from, other than it is extremely
painful and tender to the touch on the side of my right knee.
I have analyzed every aspect of my running to try and conclude what may be
the cause to my sneakers to the slope of the surfaces I run on. . . . I
would appreciate it if anyone might share there success or failures with
this injury. . I am very open to any suggestions or stories that you might
have pertaining to this type of injury.

If you would mind please send them to directly to my address

too often. thanks.
Mike Flynn

 
 
 

IT Band Syndrome. . .PLEASE HELP. . .Very Desparate

Post by KDau » Thu, 03 Oct 1996 04:00:00

Mike,

I've had a lot of trouble with ITB in the past and, although I have an MS
in sportsmedicine, have also found it to be very difficult and confusing
when it flairs up.  
As you've probably tried here's the common conservative remedy:
1) Rest--get off it (you've tried that, but as any triathlete/runner,
probably restarted a little too much before it was all gone--we all do
that.)
2) Ice regularly
3) Stretch--ask area Physical therapists about good stretches.
4) Hope, pray, etc.

Now, I have found that sometimes this helps, sometimes not.  My last
serious ITB bout required getting a corticosteroid injection--it worked
great. After 2 months of serious trouble that I couldn't get rid of I
raced a duathlon on banked sand (a great way to destroy the ITB) without
any trouble finishing 2nd overall. If you do get an injection, be certain
that it is from a physician that has had a great deal of success and is an
athlete himself.  He'll understand your situation much better and is more
likely to get the right spot.  If the physician misses the area then the
corticosteroid can just sit there without helping--maybe even hurting the
area.

 I have often found that complete rest takes even longer to heal an injury
for me.  I usually start running very, very easy (we're talking
ridiculously slow) and short distances.  I find this warms the area and
brings *** and nutrients to the area.  As the pain increases from a dull
ach that means its time to slow down and stop.  Rest the area.  Ice it and
come back again a couple of days later.

So, best conservative therapy I've found for myself (used to get very bad
ITB early in the season as I raised the mileage after a break):
(1) Ease back, but don't totally stop unless pain very sharp and painful
throughout day.
(2) STRETCH SEVERAL TIMES PER DAY. ALWAYS STRETCH WHEN MUSCLES ARE WARM. I
find stretching in a warm shower works great.
(3) Ice legs immediately after running!  If no ice, a cold garden hose
sometimes works even better.
(4) Ice massage regularly--freeze ice in a styrofoam cup, peel cup, and
massage ice over area.
(5) If you bike, check your seat height.  Too low of a seat height
contributes to ITB very significantly.
(6) Strengthen the area with leg extensions within your pain free range of
motion. Usually the first third and last third of the leg extension.  The
middle third (around 37 degrees) is the point where the ITB rubs over the
lateral condyle in the leg causing ITB.
(7) Ultrasound/phonophoresis may help (see Physical therapist)
(8) Look into orthotics from podiatrist who has treated many runners with
success--ask area runners.
(9) In extreme cases, a good physician who is an athlete himself and very
self-conscious with athletes, can give a corticosteroid injection.  If you
do get injected, stretch regularly the next few days, but stay off it
(running that is) until the swelling from the injection subsides.

I'm not a physician, so this is obviously not medical advice, just a
testiment of what has worked for me in the past.  

Good luck and e-mail me direct if you have any questions.

Karl Dauphinais

 
 
 

IT Band Syndrome. . .PLEASE HELP. . .Very Desparate

Post by Grant Schofiel » Fri, 04 Oct 1996 04:00:00

I had the same problem for the same period of time as you.  Same
depressed symptoms as well.  The good news is that I got better.  HOW you
ask?

1.Got so stable shoes that prevent pronation.  Brooks beast, Asics of
various types are good.  Excessive pronation means that the knee twists
and has to be stoppped by the IT band.  A supportive shoe therefore puts
less pressure on the iT band.

2.

 
 
 

IT Band Syndrome. . .PLEASE HELP. . .Very Desparate

Post by Grant Schofiel » Fri, 04 Oct 1996 04:00:00

I had the same problem for the same period of time as you.  Same
depressed symptoms as well.  The good news is that I got better.  HOW you
ask?

1.Got so stable shoes that prevent pronation.  Brooks beast, Asics of
various types are good.  Excessive pronation means that the knee twists
and has to be stoppped by the IT band.  A supportive shoe therefore puts
less pressure on the iT band.

2.

 
 
 

IT Band Syndrome. . .PLEASE HELP. . .Very Desparate

Post by Luis E. Varga » Fri, 04 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Quote:
> I am hoping that someone out there may have a solution to IT band
> syndrome.  

Try getting analyzed for orthotics, lots of stretching specially after bike
rides.
Ice Massage and ***anti-inflamatories. You may have to water run and take
some time off.

Luis Vargas

 
 
 

IT Band Syndrome. . .PLEASE HELP. . .Very Desparate

Post by TriRic » Fri, 04 Oct 1996 04:00:00

ITB syndrome-
    Not a fun thing, but a very preventable thing. You need to look at why
you developed this problem. I would only get the cortisone injection as a
last resort. There are many other treatments which can give symptomatic
relief until the underlying problem is corrected. Look at the places you
have been running. Don't run on sloped surfaces. The sides of roads are
usually crowned for water drainage.  The can aggravate the problem if you
don't change the direction in which you run occasionally. It is like
having a short leg. How are your shoes? New, used, different brand than
usual?
   Anyway, besides stretching and ice massage which are great, you can try
massage, trigger point therapy, and even accupuncture. This actually works
well. But if you don't correct the underlying problem it will continue to
bother you.
Rich K

 
 
 

IT Band Syndrome. . .PLEASE HELP. . .Very Desparate

Post by Eric Harv » Sat, 05 Oct 1996 04:00:00

: So, best conservative therapy I've found for myself (used to get very bad
: ITB early in the season as I raised the mileage after a break):
: (1) Ease back, but don't totally stop unless pain very sharp and painful
: throughout day.
: (2) STRETCH SEVERAL TIMES PER DAY. ALWAYS STRETCH WHEN MUSCLES ARE WARM. I
: find stretching in a warm shower works great.
: (3) Ice legs immediately after running!  If no ice, a cold garden hose
: sometimes works even better.
: (4) Ice massage regularly--freeze ice in a styrofoam cup, peel cup, and
: massage ice over area.

Or grab a well frozen juice concentrate can and massage by rolling it
gently over the entire IT band.  Also massage the lateral shin/calf region,
as muscular tightness in this region also contributes to IT band tightness.

: (5) If you bike, check your seat height.  Too low of a seat height
: contributes to ITB very significantly.

I have found this to be the exact opposite.  A saddle set too high causes
me IT band problems.  This results from the hips rocking to reach the
bottom of the pedal stroke and causing the IT band to tighten up
significantly in the upper region.  The pain, however, occurs at the
attachment of the band to the tibia or just above it.  I have observed
this in other cyclists as well.

If you develop IT problems while running, I wouldn't recommend raising the
saddle on the bike - it will be counter-productive.

: (6) Strengthen the area with leg extensions within your pain free range of
: motion. Usually the first third and last third of the leg extension.  The
: middle third (around 37 degrees) is the point where the ITB rubs over the
: lateral condyle in the leg causing ITB.
: (7) Ultrasound/phonophoresis may help (see Physical therapist)
: (8) Look into orthotics from podiatrist who has treated many runners with
: success--ask area runners.
: (9) In extreme cases, a good physician who is an athlete himself and very
: self-conscious with athletes, can give a corticosteroid injection.  If you
: do get injected, stretch regularly the next few days, but stay off it
: (running that is) until the swelling from the injection subsides.

I would treat this as a last resort.  Corticosteroid injections have been
shown to weaken the tensile strength of tendons and connective tissue.  The
treatment of Achilles tendinitis with steroid injections has led to a
certain percentage of the patients rupturing the tendon later on.  I have
seen studies on this, but I don't have the references handy.  Anyways,
I wouldn't want to have the structural integrity of my IT band compromised
for a quick-fix.

: I'm not a physician, so this is obviously not medical advice, just a
: testiment of what has worked for me in the past.  

Ditto.

Eric.
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