Tin Man Feeding

Tin Man Feeding

Post by martin.car.. » Fri, 22 Jul 1994 01:53:44


For the past couple of years I've been doing triathalons up to and including the olympic distance.  I've always made sure I'm well hydrated and drink liters of water or Gatorade and I have never experienced 'bonking' or anything like it.  This year I'm going to try a couple of long courses including Kingston the tin man at Orillia.

After reading a couple of race reports this week on the network I'm wondering if doing a long course without food is a good idea.  I would appreciate any comments;  should I plan on taking food, if so what, liquid or solid, should it be taken on the bike (it being too late on the run).  The only suggestions I've had to date include sticking bits of power bar to my bike and using electrical tape to secure bananas to my handle bars.  ( I heard that taping bananas to the handle bars can be dangerous - as they

 sometimes explode as one wrestles with the tape!)

Any comments or advice would be useful.  Thanks.

 
 
 

Tin Man Feeding

Post by Ulrich Pors » Fri, 22 Jul 1994 18:30:04

:>After reading a couple of race reports this week on the network I'm wondering if doing a long course without food is a good idea.  I would appreciate any comments;  should I plan on taking food, if so what, liquid or solid, should it be taken on the bike (it being too late on the run).  The only suggestions I've had to date include sticking bits of power bar to my bike and using electrical tape to secure bananas to my handle bars.  ( I heard that taping bananas to the handle bars can be dangerous - as th
ey

:> sometimes explode as one wrestles with the tape!)

:>Any comments or advice would be useful.  Thanks.

IMHO a long course triathlon without solid food is really not to
be recommended. What I did in my long courses so far was a triple strategy.
First, use a camelback or something to take ~ 2 litres of dissolved
long-chain-carbo with you (for example one could use something like
High Five [availability in America?] or perhaps Ultrafuel?). This keeps
your hands free for steering and catching the water and Gatorade [insert
sports drink of organizers' choice here] bottles and also for peeling
the powerbars (2-3) from your frame and eat them. On the run, you should
try and get those little long-chain-glucose sachets which were to be had
under the name of Relode in Hawaii 93 (made by the Gatorade company). Or
if better available, try to get Leppin Squeezies. The important bit, eat
something during the run, the marathon will last for three to four hours.
Do not start on Coke too early, and, if your stomach allows, try some
bananas on the run - on the bike they are to much bulk for to little
energy.

All the best,
Ulrich

--
                            Ulrich Porsch

            Wer spricht vom Siegen, "Ubersteh'n ist alles  

 
 
 

Tin Man Feeding

Post by Todd Gerla » Sat, 23 Jul 1994 01:29:23

Quote:

>  I'm wondering if doing a long course without food is a good idea.

I believe that this is a very bad idea.  For me I have to eat something during a
half-ironman race or I will bonk severly.  I have done 6 half-ironman races and
I will tell you what works for me.

 Race morning I usually eat 2 bagels and a
power bar with a water bottle full of gatroade (I also drink tons of water the
night before, If I don't get up at least 2 times in the night then I have not
drank enough).  I usually have two water bottles on my bike at the begining of
the race.  One I have plain water and the other I have some sort of high-carbo
drink.  I have used Exceed High-Carb, Ultra fuel, Coke, and Dr. Pepper in the
past.  Dr. Pepper works the best for me, but some people have trouble with the
surger.  I also have two opened power bars in the transition area which I stick
in the back of my suit when I get on the bike.  I refuse to stick them on my bike
because one they look gross and two, I have seen friends try to get baked on
power bar off their top tube.

On the bike I will space my power bar eating out so that I eat one in the first
25 miles and one in the second.  I find the best way to eat power bars on the
bike is to bite off a big chunk and stick it in the side of your mouth like
chewing tabacco.  I chew on it for the next few minutes with some occational sips
of water or gatorade.  I have found it imposible to try to chew and swallow it
all at once while trying to ride hard ( you are just breathing too hard).  As for
drinking on the bike this really depends on how hot it is.  I race mostly in
texas and I drink like a fish.  I grab a water bottle and a gatorade bottle at
every aid station.  I stick the gatorade ( or whatever the race has) in my cage
and drink most of the water right away and throw the bottle away.  Then I drink
the gatorade between aid stations.  I try to repeat this at every aid station.  I
also space out my drinking of my high carb drink over the whole bike.

Once back in the transition area, I usuall have another small bottle of high carb
drink waiting for me.  Depending on how I feel and how the eating went on the
bike, I will either take a few gulps and leave the bottle or I carry and drink
the whole thing in the half mile.  I usually try to eat a banana or orange slice
(or whatever food they have a the run aid stations) at the first couple of aid
stations.  After that I just eat when I start to feel my stomach roumble.  At
every aid station  I grab a cup water and gatorade and drink as much as I can
while running.  If they have coke I will always gab that to (Coke works really
well for me, the sugar is perfect, and I does not upset my stomach).

One important thing to remember is to practice using whatever you will use in the
race in your training.  Don't try new things on race day, you are only asking for
trouble.  Take the stuff out on your rides and runs and figure out what works for
you.

Good luck, you will really love the longer races if you eat and hydrate properly;
otherwise, they can be quite painfull.

Race Smart

Todd



 
 
 

Tin Man Feeding

Post by Matt Mahon » Sun, 24 Jul 1994 02:29:54

Quote:


>>  I'm wondering if doing a long course without food is a good idea.

No.  You don't need food for races under 3 hours because you have
enough stored glycogen (about 2000 calories) to finish on water
alone.  For races up to 6 hours, you need 200 calories of carbohydrate
per hour (the most your stomach can absorb).  The best way to get
this is in liquid form.  That's about one quart of Gatorade or other
sports drink per hour.

For races over 6 hours, you may feel nausea on just carbohydrates.
You need protein and fat.  Your race food should resemble the foods
you eat every day.  Typically, I eat solid food every 2-3 hours and
drink only water in between.

At the Great Floridian (iron distance) last year, I set up a cooler
in the transition area stocked with skim milk, orange juice, peanut
butter and banana sandwiches, cookies, and a dish of rice, beans,
vegetables, and beef stew.  The race is set up so that you can eat
at all transitions, the middle of the bike, and at 8 and 17 miles
on the run.

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Tin Man Feeding

Post by Rolf Aran » Wed, 03 Aug 1994 05:43:21

(stuff deleted)

Quote:
>You need protein and fat.  Your race food should resemble the foods
>you eat every day.  Typically, I eat solid food every 2-3 hours and
>drink only water in between.

Excellent thinking.  It is going to be a long day.  Might as well eat
normal stuff to keep the stomach happy (a mistake I made at the 1/2 Ironman
event).  

Quote:
>At the Great Floridian (iron distance) last year, I set up a cooler
>in the transition area stocked with skim milk, orange juice, peanut
>butter and banana sandwiches, cookies, and a dish of rice, beans,
>vegetables, and beef stew.  

                 ^^^^^^^^^

And what was for dessert?  

(Matt - This is not a flame.  I couldn't resist!!!)

Rolf Arands, Ph.D.

 
 
 

Tin Man Feeding

Post by Matt Mahon » Thu, 04 Aug 1994 01:39:10

Quote:


>>At the Great Floridian (iron distance) last year, I set up a cooler
>>in the transition area stocked with skim milk, orange juice, peanut
>>butter and banana sandwiches, cookies, and a dish of rice, beans,
>>vegetables, and beef stew.  
>                 ^^^^^^^^^

>And what was for dessert?  

Oreo's of course.  And congratulation to Myke Morgan who took my
advice to eat "real food" and did his first iron-distance in 10:39.
Now if only I could break 13 hours.

Here's the recipe for what I call "*** rice".  Boil 2-3 lbs of
rice and 3-4 lbs of frozen mixed vegetables in a big saucepan with
3-4 quarts of water for 19 minutes until there's no water left.
Use low heat and stir a lot so you don't burn the rice.  Then add
3 cans of beans and 2 cans of beef stew or brunswick stew.  This
makes enough for several meals.  For your ironman or ultra-marathon,
put some in a zip-loc bag with a plastic spoon or fork and eat cold.

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