triathletes - failures at single sports.

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by ecc » Wed, 12 Mar 2003 10:48:18


Is it true that triathletes are just failures in other sports, so
resort to doing three, so that a lower standard in eachsport means
that they have a better chance ?

Discuss the above statement in 400000000000 words or less.

Winner gets some hair wax, hair spray, aftershave, hair brush, fake
tan, eye lash curler..............

 
 
 

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by MJuri » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 00:25:42


Quote:
>Is it true that triathletes are just failures in other sports, so
>resort to doing three, so that a lower standard in eachsport means
>that they have a better chance ?

>Discuss the above statement in 400000000000 words or less.

>Winner gets some hair wax, hair spray, aftershave, hair brush, fake
>tan, eye lash curler..............

        This is actually an interesting topic. I think you can
actually put triathletes in four main groups.

1) Runners/Cyclist/Swimmers who have peaked in their native sport. I
have seen several tri folks who were at one time national level
competitors. Seems that sdome of these people have peaked and are
looking for a new challenge.They seem to be willing to trade some of
their current fitness in their best disipline to compete compentantly
in triathlons.

2) Midpackers - I wouldn't call these people failures by any means as
most have had a fairly long career in there respective disiplines, but
for whatever reason, choice, gentics, time etc they never really
excelled at any individual sport. After some time they've just become
bored being in the middle of the pack and want to try something new.

3) Injury victoms/cross trainers - Currently there is a push towards
cross training even for those that are concentrating in one disipline.
Some find they really like the other two and decide to try a tri.

4) Tri originals - Some just like the idea and start off doing tri's
right away.

~Matt

 
 
 

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by Mike Tennen » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 01:44:52

Quote:

>They seem to be willing to trade some of
>their current fitness in their best disipline to compete compentantly
>in triathlons.

Or non-competently. <g>  

I actually switched from short distance running (5K's) where I could
occasionally get a 3rd in AG in very small local races when no-one
else showed up, to tri's - where I don't have any chance at all
because I'm a lousy swimmer and mediocre on the bike.

I just enjoy the challenge.

MikeTennent
"IronPenguin"

 
 
 

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by Harold Buc » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 01:53:11

Quote:


> >Is it true that triathletes are just failures in other sports, so
> >resort to doing three, so that a lower standard in eachsport means
> >that they have a better chance ?

Um, Sheila Taormina (sp?) was an Olympic gold medalist (1996) in
swimming, so I think it would be tough to call her a failure in swimming.

--Harold Buck

"I used to rock and roll all night,
 and party every day.
 Then it was every other day. . . ."
      -Homer J. Simpson

 
 
 

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by MJuri » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 02:08:14

On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 11:44:52 -0500, Mike Tennent

Quote:


>>They seem to be willing to trade some of
>>their current fitness in their best disipline to compete compentantly
>>in triathlons.

>Or non-competently. <g>  

>I actually switched from short distance running (5K's) where I could
>occasionally get a 3rd in AG in very small local races when no-one
>else showed up, to tri's - where I don't have any chance at all
>because I'm a lousy swimmer and mediocre on the bike.

>I just enjoy the challenge.

>MikeTennent
>"IronPenguin"

        I guess I fall into the cross training/injury category. I
started out running. By no means world class or even real good.
However I started cross training quite abit even more when injured and
found I really enjoyed doing the other stuff. So here I am.

~Matt

 
 
 

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by JJ Waguespac » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 08:03:43

Quote:


>>They seem to be willing to trade some of
>>their current fitness in their best disipline to compete compentantly
>>in triathlons.

> Or non-competently. <g>  

> I actually switched from short distance running (5K's) where I could
> occasionally get a 3rd in AG in very small local races when no-one
> else showed up, to tri's - where I don't have any chance at all
> because I'm a lousy swimmer and mediocre on the bike.

I got into duathlon when I found I was equally mediocre at running and
cycling which put me in the next higher category when I combined the
two. A lot of multisporters are much better in one or the other and when
  I'm actually training I'm pretty well balanced.

JJ

 
 
 

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by Clif » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 10:21:04

Hi - I'd like to make the case for age-groupers who find that
triathlon is really a sport for life.  When one is younger and able to
recover faster, then running marathons, etc makes sense, but as we
age, recovery takes longer.  I now find that the mix of swim, bike and
run is near optimal for continuing an active lifestle while avoiding
injury.  Maybe this fits into the cross trainer catagory, but it is
more a forced adaptation than voluntary.  I'd prefer to run six times
a week, but my bones just aren't up to it.

All this talk of winning and not being able to compete in your native
sport is a load of bunk.  I am a winner when I step up to the starting
line.  The rest of the race is pure gravey.  The key thing is to
understand why we individually train and compete.  Personally, I'm in
it for lifetime fitness and well-being. I love the sport and hope that
others get the same enjoyment and satisfaction out of it that I do.

Can't say I understand the motivation of some of the more recent
posters to this newsgroup.

-- Cliff

Quote:

> 1) Runners/Cyclist/Swimmers who have peaked in their native sport. I
> have seen several tri folks who were at one time national level
> competitors. Seems that sdome of these people have peaked and are
> looking for a new challenge.They seem to be willing to trade some of
> their current fitness in their best disipline to compete compentantly
> in triathlons.

> 2) Midpackers - I wouldn't call these people failures by any means as
> most have had a fairly long career in there respective disiplines, but
> for whatever reason, choice, gentics, time etc they never really
> excelled at any individual sport. After some time they've just become
> bored being in the middle of the pack and want to try something new.

> 3) Injury victoms/cross trainers - Currently there is a push towards
> cross training even for those that are concentrating in one disipline.
> Some find they really like the other two and decide to try a tri.

> 4) Tri originals - Some just like the idea and start off doing tri's
> right away.

> ~Matt

 
 
 

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by MJuri » Fri, 14 Mar 2003 02:07:49


Quote:
>Hi - I'd like to make the case for age-groupers who find that
>triathlon is really a sport for life.  When one is younger and able to
>recover faster, then running marathons, etc makes sense, but as we
>age, recovery takes longer.  I now find that the mix of swim, bike and
>run is near optimal for continuing an active lifestle while avoiding
>injury.  Maybe this fits into the cross trainer catagory, but it is
>more a forced adaptation than voluntary.  I'd prefer to run six times
>a week, but my bones just aren't up to it.

        Pretty much same for me. I was running alot and last year
ended up spending a good portion of the time on the Injured reserve
list. I found I could vary my cross training actually get a larger
volume of workout in and "feel" better in all of the disiplines.
Quote:

>All this talk of winning and not being able to compete in your native
>sport is a load of bunk.  I am a winner when I step up to the starting
>line.  The rest of the race is pure gravey.  The key thing is to
>understand why we individually train and compete.  Personally, I'm in
>it for lifetime fitness and well-being. I love the sport and hope that
>others get the same enjoyment and satisfaction out of it that I do.

>Can't say I understand the motivation of some of the more recent
>posters to this newsgroup.

>-- Cliff


>> 1) Runners/Cyclist/Swimmers who have peaked in their native sport. I
>> have seen several tri folks who were at one time national level
>> competitors. Seems that sdome of these people have peaked and are
>> looking for a new challenge.They seem to be willing to trade some of
>> their current fitness in their best disipline to compete compentantly
>> in triathlons.

>> 2) Midpackers - I wouldn't call these people failures by any means as
>> most have had a fairly long career in there respective disiplines, but
>> for whatever reason, choice, gentics, time etc they never really
>> excelled at any individual sport. After some time they've just become
>> bored being in the middle of the pack and want to try something new.

>> 3) Injury victoms/cross trainers - Currently there is a push towards
>> cross training even for those that are concentrating in one disipline.
>> Some find they really like the other two and decide to try a tri.

>> 4) Tri originals - Some just like the idea and start off doing tri's
>> right away.

>> ~Matt

 
 
 

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by Arthur Tateis » Fri, 14 Mar 2003 02:15:21


Quote:

> Hi - I'd like to make the case for age-groupers who find that
> triathlon is really a sport for life.

I second that.

Quote:
> All this talk of winning and not being able to compete in your native
> sport is a load of bunk.
> ...
> Can't say I understand the motivation of some of the more recent
> posters to this newsgroup.

I've never been good enough to be in the winner's circle.  In any
individual sport.  So winning is not my motivation.  Self improvement
and satisfaction is and I'm in better shape and faster than I was 10
years ago because of triathlon.  I've met some people who do not want
to enter a tri unless they can be a contender.  They seem to be
worried that they'll finish last and embarass themselves.  I think
they're just making excuses or have a narrow view of accomplishment.

arthur
--
Unix doesn't have a monopoly on good ideas, it just owns most of them.
    - Alan Cox (http://slashdot.org/features/99/03/04/121242.shtml)

 
 
 

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by topd » Fri, 14 Mar 2003 02:55:33

Quote:

> Hi - I'd like to make the case for age-groupers who find that
> triathlon is really a sport for life.  When one is younger and able to
> recover faster, then running marathons, etc makes sense, but as we
> age, recovery takes longer.  I now find that the mix of swim, bike and
> run is near optimal for continuing an active lifestle while avoiding
> injury.  Maybe this fits into the cross trainer catagory, but it is
> more a forced adaptation than voluntary.  I'd prefer to run six times
> a week, but my bones just aren't up to it.

> All this talk of winning and not being able to compete in your native
> sport is a load of bunk.  I am a winner when I step up to the starting
> line.  The rest of the race is pure gravey.  The key thing is to
> understand why we individually train and compete.  Personally, I'm in
> it for lifetime fitness and well-being. I love the sport and hope that
> others get the same enjoyment and satisfaction out of it that I do.

As a masters-level participant, I say HEAR, HEAR!

I don't ever expect to win a race, and I may never win the master's
age group without greatly increasing my running ability (doubtful
given my knees). However, my primary goal is to get in shape and stay
in shape. Frankly, it's had to get motivated to simply train for
training's sake. Having some races to compete in helps quite a bit.
I ride with a bunch of guys 20 years my senior. Not only can they kick
my butt, they can do the same to most 20 yr olds! My wife saw one with
his helmet on and thought he was in his mid-30's. These guys are my
inspiration. I figure that when I reach 60, I can be like my parents -
100+ lbs overweight, unable to walk around the block, or like these
guys - fit, active, looking great, able to do almost anything that
they want. That's an easy choice! This, for me, is why I'm competing
in a nutshell.

 
 
 

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by MJuri » Fri, 14 Mar 2003 07:52:09


Quote:

>> Hi - I'd like to make the case for age-groupers who find that
>> triathlon is really a sport for life.  When one is younger and able to
>> recover faster, then running marathons, etc makes sense, but as we
>> age, recovery takes longer.  I now find that the mix of swim, bike and
>> run is near optimal for continuing an active lifestle while avoiding
>> injury.  Maybe this fits into the cross trainer catagory, but it is
>> more a forced adaptation than voluntary.  I'd prefer to run six times
>> a week, but my bones just aren't up to it.

>> All this talk of winning and not being able to compete in your native
>> sport is a load of bunk.  I am a winner when I step up to the starting
>> line.  The rest of the race is pure gravey.  The key thing is to
>> understand why we individually train and compete.  Personally, I'm in
>> it for lifetime fitness and well-being. I love the sport and hope that
>> others get the same enjoyment and satisfaction out of it that I do.

>As a masters-level participant, I say HEAR, HEAR!

>I don't ever expect to win a race, and I may never win the master's
>age group without greatly increasing my running ability (doubtful
>given my knees). However, my primary goal is to get in shape and stay
>in shape. Frankly, it's had to get motivated to simply train for
>training's sake. Having some races to compete in helps quite a bit.
>I ride with a bunch of guys 20 years my senior. Not only can they kick
>my butt, they can do the same to most 20 yr olds! My wife saw one with
>his helmet on and thought he was in his mid-30's. These guys are my
>inspiration. I figure that when I reach 60, I can be like my parents -
>100+ lbs overweight, unable to walk around the block, or like these
>guys - fit, active, looking great, able to do almost anything that
>they want. That's an easy choice! This, for me, is why I'm competing
>in a nutshell.

        It's amazing what kind of an inspiration this can be.  It's
highly unlikely I'll be retiring earlier and I certainly do not want
to be house bound when I'm eventually do. I look at my parents and my
wifes parent who at 60 and 70 have hard time making it from the car to
the mall. Then I look at some of of the guy's/gal's in the groups I
train with that at the same age look 15-20 years younger and
definately move 15-20 years younger. To me it's a no brainer.

~Matt  

 
 
 

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by Harold Buc » Fri, 14 Mar 2003 10:18:48

Quote:

> >I don't ever expect to win a race, and I may never win the master's
> >age group without greatly increasing my running ability (doubtful
> >given my knees). However, my primary goal is to get in shape and stay
> >in shape. Frankly, it's had to get motivated to simply train for
> >training's sake. Having some races to compete in helps quite a bit.
> >I ride with a bunch of guys 20 years my senior. Not only can they kick
> >my butt, they can do the same to most 20 yr olds! My wife saw one with
> >his helmet on and thought he was in his mid-30's. These guys are my
> >inspiration. I figure that when I reach 60, I can be like my parents -
> >100+ lbs overweight, unable to walk around the block, or like these
> >guys - fit, active, looking great, able to do almost anything that
> >they want. That's an easy choice! This, for me, is why I'm competing
> >in a nutshell.

>    It's amazing what kind of an inspiration this can be.  It's
> highly unlikely I'll be retiring earlier and I certainly do not want
> to be house bound when I'm eventually do. I look at my parents and my
> wifes parent who at 60 and 70 have hard time making it from the car to
> the mall. Then I look at some of of the guy's/gal's in the groups I
> train with that at the same age look 15-20 years younger and
> definately move 15-20 years younger. To me it's a no brainer.

My dad is 80. He's been playing racquetball 3 times a week since about
1960 (substituting tennis in the summer). I have a hard time remembering
that he's 80, and I'm sure the racquetball has a lot to do with it.

Oh, BTW, there aren't many people that can beat him. He beats the ***
out of a lot of 20-something guys who think they're going to "tire the
old guy out."

--Harold Buck

"I used to rock and roll all night,
 and party every day.
 Then it was every other day. . . ."
      -Homer J. Simpson

--Harold Buck

"I used to rock and roll all night,
 and party every day.
 Then it was every other day. . . ."
      -Homer J. Simpson

 
 
 

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by Mike Tennen » Sat, 15 Mar 2003 00:50:24

Quote:

>    It's amazing what kind of an inspiration this can be.  It's
>highly unlikely I'll be retiring earlier and I certainly do not want
>to be house bound when I'm eventually do. I look at my parents and my
>wifes parent who at 60 and 70 have hard time making it from the car to
>the mall. Then I look at some of of the guy's/gal's in the groups I
>train with that at the same age look 15-20 years younger and
>definately move 15-20 years younger. To me it's a no brainer.

>~Matt  

At 55, I guess I'm fast approaching when I'll be one of those
inspiring old farts. <g>

You might find it interesting that one of the things I enjoy most
about training and racing  is associating with the younger crowd. Many
of my peers can't walk around the block without keeling over and I
find very little in common with them. On the other hand, I can hang
out with my tri buddies, most who are younger by a fair amount,  and
share common interests and activities.

Age gracefully? Hell, no. I'm fighting it every inch of the way.

Mike Tennent
"IronPenguin"

 
 
 

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by Bill Rees » Sat, 15 Mar 2003 08:30:57

Quote:

>At 55, I guess I'm fast approaching when I'll be one of those
>inspiring old farts. <g>

Mike--
      I'm a bit older than that (2+ AGs) and one thing I find as I
 get passed on the run is that a number of folks tell me things
 like "I hope when I'm your age I'm still doing this" or just "You
are an inspiration"--My thought is that I would rather be a bit
 faster and not be passed than be an inspiration
--but I guess I'll have to take what I can get! <g>

Quote:

>You might find it interesting that one of the things I enjoy most
>about training and racing  is associating with the younger crowd. Many
>of my peers can't walk around the block without keeling over and I
>find very little in common with them. On the other hand, I can hang
>out with my tri buddies, most who are younger by a fair amount,  and
>share common interests and activities.

>Age gracefully? Hell, no. I'm fighting it every inch of the way.

AMEN TO THAT!

Bill

 
 
 

triathletes - failures at single sports.

Post by Bill » Sat, 15 Mar 2003 09:39:06

This morning I told a guy who is 9 years younger than me my age and he said
"I thought you were my age" to which I responded "and I thought you were
mine!"

Quote:




Quote:

>>At 55, I guess I'm fast approaching when I'll be one of those
>>inspiring old farts. <g>

>Mike--
>      I'm a bit older than that (2+ AGs) and one thing I find as I
> get passed on the run is that a number of folks tell me things
> like "I hope when I'm your age I'm still doing this" or just "You
>are an inspiration"--My thought is that I would rather be a bit
> faster and not be passed than be an inspiration
>--but I guess I'll have to take what I can get! <g>

>>You might find it interesting that one of the things I enjoy most
>>about training and racing  is associating with the younger crowd. Many
>>of my peers can't walk around the block without keeling over and I
>>find very little in common with them. On the other hand, I can hang
>>out with my tri buddies, most who are younger by a fair amount,  and
>>share common interests and activities.

>>Age gracefully? Hell, no. I'm fighting it every inch of the way.

>AMEN TO THAT!

>Bill