Favorite tri workouts

Favorite tri workouts

Post by Lisa Dear » Thu, 27 Feb 1997 04:00:00


I have recently been approached by a fellow triathlete friend of mine who
writes the Triathlon column in our runners club newsletter to give him my
favorite tri specific workout.  The problem lyes in that even though I have
been very sucessfull at races and am the best female triathlete in our area
I am also very new to the sport and still figuring things out especially
when it comes to training.  Mostly I train with sport specific athletes
(run with runners, ride with cyclests, swim with 12 year old wonders) and
last year I thought I was really getting "with it" when I did a few short
brick workouts.  Im sure all RST'ers would enjoy knowing what other
triathletes are doing and what their favorite workouts are.  So,  please
post yours or e-mail me and I will compile them if I get enough responses
and post them myself.

Keep training and tri-ing!
---Lisa


 
 
 

Favorite tri workouts

Post by Peter M. Canne » Thu, 27 Feb 1997 04:00:00


says...

Quote:
>Im sure all RST'ers would enjoy knowing what other
>triathletes are doing and what their favorite workouts are.  


Well, I don't know what everyone else is doing, but late at night, when my
roomates are asleep, I sneak into the ba***t for 6 hr roller rides.


     -==301 Giles Rd.==
 --==Blacksburg, VA 24060==--
---====(540)-951-3872====---

"The will to win means nothing if you do not have the will to prepare."

 
 
 

Favorite tri workouts

Post by Kaze » Thu, 27 Feb 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
> Well, I don't know what everyone else is doing, but late at night, when my
> roomates are asleep, I sneak into the ba***t for 6 hr roller rides.

That doesn't belong in a thread called Re: Favorite tri workouts.
It should be posted to alt.support.nightmares.

Ruth Kazez


 
 
 

Favorite tri workouts

Post by Corey Borolie » Fri, 28 Feb 1997 04:00:00

Favorite cycling workout-  Chasing down cars and trying to draft as long as
possible.  For example, when a vehicle, preferably a van or a truck, is
accelerating from a red light, I jump in behind them and hold on as they
speed up.  In the city they usually cruise at 50 or 60 km/hr and it's quite
a lung burner staying on.  Kind of like motorpacing.  Also lots of
sprinting.  The drivers usually don't like it though.  Should be done on
wide, reasonably low traffic roads so you can see up ahead.  I know most
will say it's dangerous and reckless, but I come from a cycling background
with lots of criterium riding and training in heavy traffic and I'm pretty
comfortable with it.

 
 
 

Favorite tri workouts

Post by Tricia Richt » Fri, 28 Feb 1997 04:00:00

I suppose that it's technically not a tri-specific workout, but it *is* my
favorite workout:

A 4-mile bike climb up King's Mountain Road, at an average grade of 7-8%.
When I'm in reasonably good shape the climb takes me about 35 minutes to
complete, and it's probably the most productive 35 minutes I ever spend on
my bike.  I got away with really minimal bike mileage last season 'cause I
simply climbed this monster so much.  Round trip from my house, I can get
in this climb in an hour and a half.  It totals out to just over 18 miles,
but it's an efficient use of the time, that's for sure.

Tri-Baby

                                     _
                                  -    o
     '             -  __o       -    </\_
 `     '         -    \<         - __/\
   /\o_         - (()) (())        -  /
^^^^^^^^^^    

"REAL Triathletes don't draft."

http://www-leland.stanford.edu/~brooksie        

 
 
 

Favorite tri workouts

Post by Adrian Wynn » Sat, 01 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> Favorite cycling workout-  Chasing down cars and trying to draft as long as
> possible.

I nearly dented my head on the back of a Caravan last summer doing this
- their brakes are much sharper than mine!

Apart from that incident, it's a great game to see how long you can hold
on for.

Quote:
> ... The drivers usually don't like it though.

I find that if there are any kids in the back seat, they love it! I've
had lots of smiles and waves, but mostly it's disbelief.

Anybody else have any interesting games to keep themselves amused during
training?

regards

adrian

 
 
 

Favorite tri workouts

Post by Joe Svente » Sat, 01 Mar 1997 04:00:00

I didn't catch the initial posting on this topic.

Attached below is a copy of an article I wrote about 9 months ago; I
never
actually go around to submitting it to one of the magazines, partially
because I didn't have time, and partially due to a conviction that it
would probably be rejected.

It certainly represents my most important workout, although calling it
my
favorite is stretching the meaning of "favorite".  For those of you in
the
San Francisco Bay Area, I do the workout at Rancho San Antonio Park.  If
anyone wants to know the route (with its two climbs of High Meadow
Trail),
I'd be glad to provide it; fortunately, this workout does not depend
upon
a particular route so much as having a course with substantial hills.
Any
park on the peninsula will certainly do.

Joe Sventek

                My Keystone Workout for Multisport Success

                                Joe Sventek

Have you ever noticed that one particular workout, done regularly as
part
of your training regimen, seems to be essential to your success?  I
recall
that the short speed intervals on the track every Thursday during my
university career seemed to play this role in my 5k/10k racing days.
I've
been doing the duathlon/triathlon thing for 5 years now, and have
detected
an equivalent keystone workout for my multisport success.

How would one determine if a particular workout was the "keystone"?  It
seems
that the needs of my job and different competitive foci have caused me
to
eliminate different workouts from my training for 3-4 months at a time.
Continued racing in multisport events during such periods, even though
the
principal competitive focus might be a marathon (for instance), gives me
the
opportunity to subjectively compare performance with/without the
particular
workout.  As such, the following is anecdotal.  No pretense to the use
of the
scientific method should be inferred.

I have long been a proponent of including regular hill training, both on
the
bike and the run, in a multisport training regimen.  Ascents on the run
give
you the opportunity to train at elevated heart rates without requiring
the
speed and pounding of track intervals;  descents, on the other hand, let
you
experience higher speeds, aiding turnover rate.  Ascents on the bike let
you
find (and fix) deficiencies in your pedalling mechanics (pedal in
circles);
descents help you develop bike handling skills at high speed.

Rob Sleamaker proposes Vertical intervals as a component of his SERIOUS
training plan; Owen Anderson, among others, recommends downhill
intervals to
improve turnover rate and running economy.  My keystone workout combines
these two aspects.

This workout depends heavily upon the use of a heart rate monitor
and knowledge of your maximum HR, AT HR, and resting HR.  Although there
are a variety of methods for estimating these, I strongly recommend
having
a maximal stress test performed to obtain accurate values to these
parameters.

The purpose of the workout is to keep the uphill portions of the run
right
at your anaerobic threshold, while keeping the downhill and flat
portions
at an aggressive pace (don't dog the downhills because the uphills are
so strenuous).  Use the HR monitor to achieve this purpose by setting
the
upper limit right at your AT (usually 80-85% of max) and the lower limit
at
65% of max.  By forcing yourself to keep within these limits, you will
work the uphills at AT and force yourself to work the downhills.

My workout consists of a 8.5-mile run on trails with 3 hills mixed in,
totalling ~1500 feet of ascent.  My HR values are:

     Maximum 195
     AT      175
     Resting  55

I, therefore, set my limits at (145, 175).  Using my stopwatch, I note
the splits at convenient landmarks at the foot and summit of each
ascent,
as well as the start and finish.  I do this workout weekly on Thursday
afternoons, being reasonably well-recovered from track intervals on
Tuesday
at noon and stationary bike intervals on Wednesday morning.

You should definitely see the overall time and individual splits improve
as you do this from week to week.  You will also notice substantially
improved leg turnover in your track workouts and races.  You should also
notice improved strength in your multisport races; forcing yourself to
go fast to keep above the lower limit, even when you are tired from the
ascent, gets your body ready to handle the bike to run transition, both
from
a physical as well as a mental standpoint.

Several variations on this theme are possible:

 1. If you are feeling tired on the day, you could scale the HR window
down
    by 5-10 beats.  Doing the hills is still good for you, even if you
don't
    do them as aggressively.

 2. As your conditioning improves (both endurance and strength of
connective
    tissues in the legs) you can move the lower limit up.  This will
force
    you to work even harder on the downhill portions.

 3. This workout, together with the rest of your training, may actually
cause
    your AT to climb (after all, that is one of the purposes of quality
    training).  If so, you should raise both the upper and lower
limits.  How
    will you know that your AT has climbed?  Absent another maximal
stress
    test, if you find the ascents beginning to approximate a piece of
cake,
    you might try moving things up by 5 bpm.

Copyright (c) 1996 Joseph S. Sventek

 
 
 

Favorite tri workouts

Post by gil gillilan » Sat, 01 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Quote:


> > Favorite cycling workout-  Chasing down cars and trying to draft as long as
> > possible.

> I nearly dented my head on the back of a Caravan last summer doing this
> - their brakes are much sharper than mine!

> Apart from that incident, it's a great game to see how long you can hold
> on for.

> > ... The drivers usually don't like it though.

> I find that if there are any kids in the back seat, they love it! I've
> had lots of smiles and waves, but mostly it's disbelief.

> Anybody else have any interesting games to keep themselves amused during
> training?

> regards

> adrian

I don't know about the rest of you but this sounds nuts to me.  I value
my life enough not to do that.  One mistake and it would be over.  

gil gilliland

 
 
 

Favorite tri workouts

Post by Kenneth D. Erv » Tue, 04 Mar 1997 04:00:00

: >
: > Favorite cycling workout-  Chasing down cars and trying to draft as long as
: > possible.

: I nearly dented my head on the back of a Caravan last summer doing this
: - their brakes are much sharper than mine!

: Apart from that incident, it's a great game to see how long you can hold
: on for.

: > ... The drivers usually don't like it though.

: I find that if there are any kids in the back seat, they love it! I've
: had lots of smiles and waves, but mostly it's disbelief.

: Anybody else have any interesting games to keep themselves amused during
: training?

: regards

: adrian

Don't drivers hate us enough as it is?  I don't want to contribute to the
problem.  Please don't***around with cars and create another
cyclist-hating driver.  I've been run over, too, and the risk from these
games is not worth it.
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