Results: STEEP VS SLACK, 650 VS 700C (long..)

Results: STEEP VS SLACK, 650 VS 700C (long..)

Post by david alber » Fri, 15 Nov 1996 04:00:00


For those of you interested, here are the results of my little survey on STEEP VS SLACK, 650C VS 700C WHEELS:
TOTAL # OF VOTES: 23 (REMAINS TO BE SEEN IF THIS IS A LARGE ENOUGH SAMPLE SIZE)

STEEP, 650C BIKES: 60%

STEEP, 700C BIKES: 22%

SLACK, 650C BIKES: 4.5%

SLACK, 700C BIKES: 13.5%

I will not perform a statistical analysis, but I think we can see the trend here.
For those of you who were unsure of what steep or slack meant, this refers to the effective seat tube angle.
An angle of 76 or more degrees is considered steep, less than this, like a road bike with north american or european geometry, is
considered slack.

The reason i did this survey was to see if the triathlon community was following the industry marketing strategies, and the tendencies
of the pros to use the tricked out, 650c, steep bikes.

I just invested in a Softride Solo, which many of you know is 700c, but from what I have seen at races, wheel size doesn't determine
how well you cycle.  This will be my first new, cool bike, and I am very e***d.  I plan on doing Ironman distance races in a few
years, and I want to be comfortable, dammit!  Anyway, my bike shop, Martin Swiss cycle and ski, has access to the discontinued
Solo line, so if you are in the Montreal area, and you are interested, please E-mail me for their phone #. (Yes, they are sponsoring me,
but I also think they are  a bunch of cool guys who deserve a little recognition for a good job done).
See you at the races.

 
 
 

Results: STEEP VS SLACK, 650 VS 700C (long..)

Post by Tom Ru » Fri, 15 Nov 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>For those of you interested, here are the results of my little survey on STEEP VS SLACK, 650C VS 700C WHEELS:
>TOTAL # OF VOTES: 23 (REMAINS TO BE SEEN IF THIS IS A LARGE ENOUGH SAMPLE SIZE)

Surely you are not suggesting that "your little survey" is
even an approximation to a statistical study?   Twenty-three
responses (self-selecting I might add...) can't be used to
derive anything other than to say you have twenty three
anecdotes.

Quote:
>I will not perform a statistical analysis, but I think we can see the trend here.

Er.. what trend? If you mean are the 650c/steep bikes
getting more popular -- sure.  But that is also a function
of the sponsorship from the new kids (bike mfgs.) who  are
paying people to ride them.  

Quote:
>The reason i did this survey was to see if the triathlon community was following the industry marketing strategies, and the tendencies
>of the pros to use the tricked out, 650c, steep bikes.

I'm gonna wait for Dan Empfield's IMH survey (also biased,
but with a much larger sample size that at least could have
a statistical measure of rigor).   See comment above on
sponsorships...

Quote:
>I just invested in a Softride Solo,...

Yep... been there  -- done that.  Nice bikes.  Now if I
could only get my better half to let me write a cheque for
yet another Powercurve...

Tom

 
 
 

Results: STEEP VS SLACK, 650 VS 700C (long..)

Post by david alber » Sat, 16 Nov 1996 04:00:00

Quote:


>  >For those of you interested, here are the results of my little survey on STEEP VS SLACK, 650C VS 700C WHEELS:
>  >TOTAL # OF VOTES: 23 (REMAINS TO BE SEEN IF THIS IS A LARGE ENOUGH SAMPLE SIZE)

>  Surely you are not suggesting that "your little survey" is
>  even an approximation to a statistical study?   Twenty-three
>  responses (self-selecting I might add...) can't be used to
>  derive anything other than to say you have twenty three
>  anecdotes.

>  >I will not perform a statistical analysis, but I think we can see the trend here.

>  Er.. what trend? If you mean are the 650c/steep bikes
>  getting more popular -- sure.  But that is also a function
>  of the sponsorship from the new kids (bike mfgs.) who  are
>  paying people to ride them.  

>  >The reason i did this survey was to see if the triathlon community was following the industry marketing strategies, and the
tendencies
>  >of the pros to use the tricked out, 650c, steep bikes.

>  I'm gonna wait for Dan Empfield's IMH survey (also biased,
>  but with a much larger sample size that at least could have
>  a statistical measure of rigor).   See comment above on
>  sponsorships...

>  >I just invested in a Softride Solo,...

>  Yep... been there  -- done that.  Nice bikes.  Now if I
>  could only get my better half to let me write a cheque for
>  yet another Powercurve...

>  Tom

My My, you are a critical little guy, aren't you?  Relax, I agree with you regarding the stats, and the sponsorship thing.  I was just
having a little fun with the concept of a survey (of anecdotes)....by the way, what do you mean by "yet another powercurve..."?

No flame intended.
What age group did you say you were, again...?
Dave

 
 
 

Results: STEEP VS SLACK, 650 VS 700C (long..)

Post by Tom Ru » Sat, 16 Nov 1996 04:00:00

<stats flamefest snipped...>

Quote:
>My My, you are a critical little guy, aren't you?  

Yep, That's me alright! <smile>  Except the little part <g>.

Quote:
>Relax, I agree with you regarding the stats, and the sponsorship thing.

Whew... that means I don't have to give you a hard time on
that part.

Quote:
> I was just
>having a little fun with the concept of a survey (of anecdotes)....

To quote Disreali... "a poor decision maker uses stats like
a drunk uses a lamp post -- for support rather than
illumination".  The problem is that a lot of people seem to
think that you automatically have to get a tri bike to (a)
be a real triathlete and (b) have fun.  FOTM is that many
many races are won on good old road (700c slack) bikes.

But since you are talking anecdotes, all flames are off...

Quote:
>by the way, what do you mean by "yet another powercurve..."?

I had (AFAIK) the first one in Canada  and I WANT ANOTHER
ONE!!!  NOW!!!!!

Quote:
>No flame intended.

Likewise -- just doing a bit of ng stats policing <smile>

Quote:
>What age group did you say you were, again...?

I'm waiting for the over 40 before I can feel competitive
again ('cept for that Dave S. guy...)

Tom