Iliotibial Band Problems

Iliotibial Band Problems

Post by Pratigya Polissa » Sat, 09 Jan 1999 04:00:00


Dear RSTers,
        I got into doing triathlons last summer and had a blast completing
three sprints (~0.5m/20m/3.5m) and doing the Tupper Lake 1/2IM as a team
with a few friends.  I would like to compete in longer distances solo,
but a recurring problem in my knee (Iliotibial band sydnrome) has
prevented me from running further than 3-4 miles.  Biking and swimming
have been no problem so I have concentrated on them, but the runs are
killing me.
        I was wondering if anyone else has had experience with this problem and
has overcome/managed the problem.  I have been doing the stretches that
the doctor recommended (alright not religiously, but pretty often :).  I
run on grass when I can (it is snow and ice season making it pretty
difficult), and never run two days in a row to give my knee a chance to
recover.  Even with all this I still am constantly fighting the
problem.  I played soccer until I was injured (5 years ago--never play
ultimate frisbee on a tennis court!) and have always hiked and run a lot
(i.e. I'm not new to working my knees).
        Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated (via e-mail or news
group)!!

Pratigya Polissar

P.S. I just discovered newsgroups and RST about a month ago and have
enjoyed the community, supportive atmosphere, and interesting advice
that this place has to offer.  Thanks!

 
 
 

Iliotibial Band Problems

Post by Michael Kell » Sat, 09 Jan 1999 04:00:00

: prevented me from running further than 3-4 miles.  Biking and swimming
: have been no problem so I have concentrated on them, but the runs are
: killing me.

... etc

: has overcome/managed the problem.  I have been doing the stretches that
: the doctor recommended (alright not religiously, but pretty often :).  I

Ack!  I seem to manage to ITB my knee once a year.  The ONLY thing that
has ever worked for me is, in addition to the stretches and
strengthening, taking time off.  Do your scheduled runs on the bike if it
doesn't hurt to do so (my own ITB trouble has never extended to the bike)
and just don't run for at least a week, maybe more.  

The first time I did it to myself I would take a few days off running, it
would feel ok, I'd run a couple miles, and ouch.  It kept hampering me to
the point that it dogged me and messed up my running for several months.
I had to take almost two full months off.  This year I got it, and I
immediately took two weeks off, ran a scheduled marathon, it ached a bit,
and I then took four weeks off.  And it's now fine.  Instead of
dogging me from November to February, it only took out part of October and
November.  

In other words -- DON'T RUN FOR A WHILE.  You'll be annoyed and feel like
you're losing fitness, but you'll be much better off in the long .... run
(doh!).  At least, that's what's worked for me.

Mike in DC

 
 
 

Iliotibial Band Problems

Post by David Barcl » Sat, 09 Jan 1999 04:00:00

        I have had a lot of success with stretching, icing, and weekly
visits to the chiropracter. She does all kinds of pushing, prodding, and
poking, but it really helps.

Yours

David Barclay

Ironman Lanzarote 1999
Triathlon: "Swim, Bike, Crawl"

 
 
 

Iliotibial Band Problems

Post by Sal Santolucit » Sat, 09 Jan 1999 04:00:00

I'm beginning to get this, so I'm going to take a week off and start icing
it.  What kind of stretching to you recommend??

--  Salvador Santolucito III

Quote:

> I have had a lot of success with stretching, icing, and weekly
>visits to the chiropracter. She does all kinds of pushing, prodding, and
>poking, but it really helps.

>Yours

>David Barclay

>Ironman Lanzarote 1999
>Triathlon: "Swim, Bike, Crawl"

 
 
 

Iliotibial Band Problems

Post by Pierre Redmon » Sat, 09 Jan 1999 04:00:00

I developed ITB friction syndrome in 1993 (age 35).  I carefully read and
reread the advice in Dr. Tim Noakes' invaluable book "The Lore of Running".
I can't recommend that book enough.  His advice (and professional help as
needed) has allowed me to diagnose and solve ITB, torn meniscus cartilage,
and a stress fracture, plus other minor bugs.

I traced my ITB to a change in running terrain.  (I moved to a hilly area
with highly cambered roads and ran these paved roads daily and hard until I
developed the ITB friction syndrome.)  The solution for me was complete rest
from running for 3 weeks (each case is unique, could be 2 weeks, could be 2
months), and then I greatly reduced the hilly-paved-cambered road running by
mixing in runs on more level and/or softer terrain.  I also detected a
leg-length discrepancy and purchased custom graphite orthotics with a heel
lift for the short leg.  The orthotics also addressed my over-pronation
problem.  I also included specific ITB stretches into my daily stretching
routine.  Please note that the stretches are a preventive aid and will not
treat existing ITB friction syndrome.  In general one should avoid
stretching inflamed connective tissue.

The above steps solved my ITB friction syndrome problem and it has never
recurred.  Two years ago I took up triathlon and feel that the cross
training and reduced running mileage helps to avoid many running related
injuries, particularly in older athletes.  Also note that according to Dr.
Noakes, I believe it is 17% of runners who develop ITB FS are unable to
permanently resolve it and must abandon running.

Good luck.

 
 
 

Iliotibial Band Problems

Post by coma » Sun, 10 Jan 1999 04:00:00

only a small word of advice. take time off to take care of this now! if it
progresses its going to be hell to deal with.
 
 
 

Iliotibial Band Problems

Post by GILB » Sun, 10 Jan 1999 04:00:00

<<What kind of stretching to you recommend??>>

Just to balance this discussion...remember that many of these problems are due
to overstretched muscles (TFL, glut max, etc.). Stretching them more could make
them worse.
Phil Maffetone

 
 
 

Iliotibial Band Problems

Post by Kevin Wuert » Mon, 11 Jan 1999 04:00:00

Find a good sports and rehab massage therapist. A little passive stretching
and you'll be on your on your feet in no time. Make sure they have lots of
experience with athletes 500 hours certification minimum.
Kevin
PS a good therapist is hard to find but worth their weight in gold.
 
 
 

Iliotibial Band Problems

Post by Dave Foste » Mon, 11 Jan 1999 04:00:00

I agree with Kevin's assessment.  A massage therapist can really make the
difference in your training, and speed recovery from just about everything
that might be ailing you.  It's not snake oil or a cure-all, but it's darn
close!  I'm fortunate enough to have one for a spouse, but you know the old
saying about the shoemakers kids...  ;-)
Dave
Quote:

>Find a good sports and rehab massage therapist. A little passive stretching
>and you'll be on your on your feet in no time. Make sure they have lots of
>experience with athletes 500 hours certification minimum.
>Kevin
>PS a good therapist is hard to find but worth their weight in gold.

 
 
 

Iliotibial Band Problems

Post by WannaBFa » Thu, 14 Jan 1999 04:00:00

Quote:
>I was wondering if anyone else has had experience with this problem and
>has overcome/managed the problem.

You have probably gotten all the advice you want or need at this point.  I've
read the other postings, and agree on all points.  I'd just emphasise as much
down time from running as you need.  you will stay fit from the other
activities, and it won't take long to regain your stride so to say.

I also have found that working in weight training once a week can help prevent
many running ills.  If you have strong, well balanced muscles, your joints and
ligaments will be better protected.

Flat feet?  See a podiatrist for orthodics.  

Good luck!
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