ITU World Champs: the pro's story.

ITU World Champs: the pro's story.

Post by Kristjan Snorraso » Tue, 18 Nov 1997 04:00:00


Carney and McCormack win ITU Triathlon World Championship titles
Australians Emma Carney and Chris McCormack confirmed their status as
the world's best triathletes with stunning wins in the 1997 ITU
Triathlon World Championships in Perth, Australia today.  The duo
started the year leading the ITU Triathlon World Rankings after wins
in the opening round of the 1997 season in Ishigaki, Japan and will
both finish the year as the undisputed champions.
Carney's and McCormack's wins gives the pair the international
triathlon double in 1997 as they combine world championships wins with
ITU Triathlon World Cup crowns.  Carney's title was secured before she
arrived in Perth, but McCormack's victory seals the 1997 crown for the
Australian.
The strongest fields ever assembled for an ITU Triathlon World
Championships heard the starters gun in perfect conditions on Perth's
Swan River.  In the women's event,  Barb Lindquist (USA) and Loretta
Harrop (AUS) were first out of the water and onto the bike closely
followed by Rina Hill also of Australia.  Sharon Donnelly of Canada
and Magali Messmer of Switzerland followed as a small group of two and
then a large group of 20 women set out onto the bike including most of
the pre-race favourites - Australians Emma Carney, Jackie Gallagher
and Michellie Jones, all previous world champions.  Carney, Gallagher
and Jones exited the water together over a minute and a half behind
the leaders.
After the first 8k lap of the bike leg Lindquist and Harrop had broken
away and had a lead of 1 minute 20 seconds over a chase pack of eight
women. Carney was prominent at the front of the group working very
hard to breach the gap to the leaders, followed by: Gallagher, Jones,
Marie Overbye (NED), Isabelle Mouthon (FRA), Magali Messmer (SUI),
Jennifer Gutierrez (USA) and Nancy Kemp-Arendt (LUX).  On lap four the
group led by Carney caught Lindquist and Harrop, with ten athletes
entering the bike to run transition with a lead of over a minute from
the chasing women.
Carney asserted herself immediately and only Gallagher and Jones were
able to follow her move.  The three Australians quickly established a
break with Overbye and Mouthon leading the pursuers.  The three
leaders ran together for the first three kilometres before Jones began
to drop off the pace, she had *** on her foot from a collision in
the transition area, which later required stitches.  At the five
kilometre turnaround Carney and Gallagher running side by side were 15
seconds clear of Jones.  First Carney surged and Gallagher responded,
then Gallagher surged and Carney responded.  The race was not decided
until within the last kilometre when Carney finally broke clear and
ran exuberantly through the enormous crowd to regain the ITU Triathlon
World Championship she last won in 1994.  Carney finished 14 seconds
clear of Gallagher with Jones third to complete an Australian clean
sweep of the medals a further one minute 16 seconds adrift.
Carney was delighted and a little relieved to notch her second world
championships win.   "The surges started about two and a half k's out.
I nearly lost my goggles in the swim, which made me cranky so I
decided to knuckle down."  "Although I led most of the way in the bike
we weren't chasing that hard and I new it would able a sprint.  I was
quite emotional coming down the straight and it's more satisfying than
my win in Wellington."  A jubilant winner latter told the national
radio broadcaster in Australia that the win was "the greatest day of
her life."
Gallagher said she did not surprise herself with her silver medal
despite a quite season.  I think this proves that I'm a championships
competitor and second, first, and second in the last three years isn't
too bad."
Jones, who suffered a gashed foot that required two stitches after the
race following a collision with Isabelle Mouthon at the bike-run
transition was also pleased with her result.  It was difficult at the
start - it was a definite advantage to be in the top then of the ITU
world rankings as you got a clearer swim start, but although I was
behind I was in a good group at the end of the swim.  I got barrelled
over by Isabelle.  I knew it was bleeding  a lot, and it wasn't going
to be pretty.  It was stinging and got number and number."
In the men's event, the 1,500m swim failed to split field.  Simon
Lessing (GBR) led from the start with McCormack,  perennial favourite,
Brad Beven of Australia and two other former world champions, Miles
Stewart and Greg Welch, as well as in-form New Zealander Hamish Carter
winner of the last two World Cup events.  So it was a large bunch of
over 20 riders who set out on the bike course together.
The decisive move occurred on the first of five laps of the 40
kilometre bike course when a group of ten broke clear.  Four
Australians - Brad Beven, Miles Stewart, Chris McCormack and Greg
Bennett, three Frenchmen - Stephane Poulat, Stephan Bignet and Laurent
Jeamselme, as well as Lessing, Hamish Carter (NZL) and a surprise
packet in Joachim Willen of Sweden.  The lead over the pursuing pack
was out to one minute and 20 seconds at one stage, and Greg Welch
(AUS), despite working hard at the front of this second pack was
unable to bridge the gap.  On lap four Miles Stewart pulled out with a
flat rear tire.  McCormack was especially slick in transition and
stole a small break on the field.  Going into the opening straight
stretch of the run he had a five second lead and set a punishing pace.
Just behind were Brad Beven and Hamish Carter running together but
Simon Lessing lost a little ground in the transition and was destined
to chase from behind.
Despite the blistering pace (the leaders clocked close to 14 minutes
for the first 5 kilometres) McCormack still looked strong at the half
way point.  At this stage he had an 18 second lead over Carter and
Lessing who were running shoulder to shoulder.  Brad Beven was fourth
but too far back to pose a threat with the three leaders.
Carried along by the enthusiastic spectators McCormack was able to
withstand the surges from behind and over the final few hundred metres
showed his elation to the crowd as he enjoyed a popular local victory.
In the last two kilometres Carter broke away from Lessing to finish
13 seconds behind McCormack with Lessing having to be content with
third, 37 seconds behind the leader.
Immediately after the event an emotional McCormack could only exclaim
repeatedly that he was the "world champion, the world champion."  At
the post race press conference his feelings where still similar.  "I'm
the world champion, how do you think I feel - it's unbelievable.  The
two guys next too me are the best in the world and today it was my
day."
Carter said he just couldn't hold on after McCormack began the run so
strongly.  "It was in the first kilometer really, he went pretty quick
and it took a while to get into my stride.  I had a tussle with Brad
and then Simon.  I felt strong in the second half and felt I was
catching, I gave it all I had, but he wasn't coming back."
Lessing said he felt good during the swim and then started to
struggle.  "I had a surprisingly good swim, felt good, got on the bike
and didn't feel my usual self and I knew then that is was going to be
a tough day.  When you run against the likes of Chris and Hamish it
was a big worry for.  I tried to take it easy on the bike and save it
for the run.  On the run, Hamish surged and I just couldn't stay with
him."
The event brings to close the International triathlon season after the
successful conduct of ten ITU Triathlon World Cups and five ITU World
Championships.  The 1998 ITU calendar will be released shortly.

Men
1. Chris McCormack AUS 1:48:29
2. Hamish Carter NZL 1:48:42
3. Simon Lessing GBR 1:49:07
4. Brad Beven AUS 1:49:39
5. Greg Bennett AUS 1:49:47
6. Greg Welch AUS 1:49:56
7. Paul Amey NZL 1:50:00
8. Stephane Poulat FRA 1:50:09
9. Simon Whitfield CAN 1:50:13
10. Jamie Hunt NZL 1:50:17
Women
1. Emma Carney AUS 1:59:22
2. Jackie Gallagher AUS 1:59:36
3. Michellie Jones USA 2:00:48
4. Marie Overbye DEN 2:01:05
5. Isabelle Mouthon FRA 2:01:09
6. Anja Dittmer GER 2:01:44
7. ***ia Berasategui ESP 2:01:49
8. Rina Hill AUS 2:01:54
9. Mieke Suys BEL 2:02:12
10. Magali Messmer SUI 2:02:23
Full results including junior and age-group at www.triathlon.org

 
 
 

ITU World Champs: the pro's story.

Post by David Wut » Tue, 18 Nov 1997 04:00:00

[story snipped]

just imagine how much more exciting Welch's chase could have been
if he had not been chasing a pack...

Quote:
> The event brings to close the International triathlon season after the
> successful conduct of ten ITU Triathlon World Cups and five ITU World
> Championships.

Ummmm... how can there be five "world championships"?  Shouldn't
there be only one per year?  This sounds wierd - not that I'd expect
more from the ITU. ;-)

David

 
 
 

ITU World Champs: the pro's story.

Post by David Wut » Tue, 18 Nov 1997 04:00:00

Quote:



> > [story snipped]

> > just imagine how much more exciting Welch's chase could have been
> > if he had not been chasing a pack...
> Could you please explain to me and others how it would
> have been more exciting.

Sure!  Imagine if the lead pack were unable to work together and
save energy for the run.  Instead of Welch against the pack, it
would be Welch against one bike, then the next, then the next.
Kinda like what we saw in IMH during the bike.  That shows an
individual's strength in the bike and is more exciting (to me).
Then, we can see how those with running strengths can react on
the run.  Maybe I'm just weird, but I like that...

Granted, I like watching cycling.  It has some interesting *team*
strategies.  But, I prefer the individual approach for triathlons.

To answer your other question (Emma thread), I think that drafting
negates advantages that swimmers and cyclists have over runners.
But this has been discussed to death here on rst.  So, you may
have your opinion, I'll have mine.

Some people prefer drafting, many do not.  The choice is yours.

As for me, I choose NO DRAFTING.

David