Aerobars -- Profile vs Scott vs Syntace ?

Aerobars -- Profile vs Scott vs Syntace ?

Post by Stephen R. Roger » Thu, 27 Apr 1995 04:00:00


I'm about to outfit a conventional geometry 700c bike with  
aerobars (plus other 'fit' adjustments so far as possible) for  
triathlon.  Although I agree with other threads concerning the  
general advisability of using a "steep geometry" frame, I want  
to make sure I can accomodate this position before considering  
a complete bike change.  Among the prevailing clip-on  
favorites seem to be Profile Airstrike, Scott RCO and Syntace  
C2.  I'd be interested in hearing from those who have tried  
these concerning their relative merits.  Thanks.
 
 
 

Aerobars -- Profile vs Scott vs Syntace ?

Post by Ryun G. Pavlic » Fri, 28 Apr 1995 04:00:00

I tried the Profile Airstryke out with a sponsorship deal and
found the adjustablity nice but the pads were noisy and
generally inconvienent. If you end up with these bars I
recommend zip tying the pads to the bars. I am now using the
RCO and they work pretty well. I hope this helps.
--
           Ryun Pavlicek             __o     "livin' and dyin'

           8o4.971.3509           (_)/ (_)         J. Buffett

 
 
 

Aerobars -- Profile vs Scott vs Syntace ?

Post by Michael Sh » Fri, 28 Apr 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
(Ryun G. Pavlicek) writes:

>I tried the Profile Airstryke out with a sponsorship deal and
>found the adjustablity nice but the pads were noisy and
>generally inconvienent. If you end up with these bars I
>recommend zip tying the pads to the bars. I am now using the
>RCO and they work pretty well. I hope this helps.
>--
>           Ryun Pavlicek             __o     "livin' and dyin'

>           8o4.971.3509           (_)/ (_)         J. Buffett

I had a similar experience. I recently replaced my profile Airstikes
with the Scott RCO bars and am now happy as a clam.

My complaints with the Profile Airstrikes:

1. Armrests springing up when you shift (I still have STI) makes
getting back them in a little tricky. The new version might not use the
springs, I'm not sure about this.
2. Armrests bounce around alot on bumpy roads, makes an annoying noise
3. Bars are too flexible, mostly due to the fact that they have an
expander bolt assembly to accommodate different lengths of arms.
4. Armrest assembly comes loose all the time, mostly from vibrations
and popping up all the time.
5. Right armrest spring finally broke on me after about 2 years. Now it
just flops down.

I like the RCOs because:

1. Solid as a rock
2. Armrests are easy to move up when you want them to.
3. You can move the armrests back towards your elbows for better
support.
4. Little shock absorbers under the armrests. The new airstrikes have
this too.

Several friends of mine have the syntace bars (w/ and w/o the syntace
cowhorns) and like them alot. I like to be able to flip the armrests up
for the mega climbing.

Mike

 
 
 

Aerobars -- Profile vs Scott vs Syntace ?

Post by Pat Br » Fri, 28 Apr 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

> My complaints with the Profile Airstrikes:

> 1. Armrests springing up when you shift

This can be fixed by zip-tieing the pads down at least halfway.

Quote:
> 2. Armrests bounce around alot on bumpy roads, makes an annoying noise

Fixed via #1.

Quote:
> 3. Bars are too flexible, mostly due to the fact that they have an
> expander bolt assembly to accommodate different lengths of arms.

Only for those who have them extended close to the max.

Quote:
> 4. Armrest assembly comes loose all the time, mostly from vibrations
> and popping up all the time.

Can be fixed with blue LocTight

Quote:
> 5. Right armrest spring finally broke on me after about 2 years. Now it
> just flops down.

Bummer.  I think there is a lifetime warranty so you could get it replaced.

While all these points are valid and there are workarounds,  personally it
seems like you have to kludge these things to work the way you want, which
is something to consider before you spend $100.

I've ridden on both AirStrykes and Syntace and find the Syntace to be far
superior.  You only have 3 sizes to choose from which is a limiting factor
compared to the continuous adjustability of the AirStrykes.  However, the
Syntace is much more comfortable and much more stable.  Also, the pads are
3 cm behind the handlebars which will let you use your normal length road
stem instead of getting a short tri stem.  The Syntace bars are the most
expensive which might be the biggest drawback.

Hope this helps?!?

Pat

---------------------------------------------
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   W.Patrick Brug, Ph.D.  _-           -_
   Los Alamos National Lab -__       __-    
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-----------------..-^--^--..-.-     --^.-----
---------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Aerobars -- Profile vs Scott vs Syntace ?

Post by Jmje » Sun, 30 Apr 1995 04:00:00

Stephen
      I have tried  almost all the tribars since the first ones came out
many years ago.   Unfortunately, I have not tried the syntace ones.
However, here are my thoughts about the others.
 1. original dh bars are great but not if you want clip on convenience.  
If you put them on or the profile equivalent, they are on for good.  The
switch over is difficult. However, they are light- lighter than any bar
and clipon combination, and they offer a wide variety of hand positions.
2.  I agree that the air strykes are noisy.  If you really tighten them
down, they will only rattle a little.  Also, I don't like the profile bar
end shifter mount.
3.  The RCO is what I am riding now,  and they are the best so far.  I
have them equipped with bar end shifters and I like the positions
available and the fact that they fold up (just like the air strykes)  That
gives you the good climbing position.
4.  The syntace you cannot fold up but I hear they are otherwise
comfortable.

 good luck                    J. Mark Jensen