Bike-Run vs. Run-Bike workouts?

Bike-Run vs. Run-Bike workouts?

Post by HaroldBu » Thu, 04 Jan 2001 12:32:31


I often hear people warn against doing bike-run workouts. I agree, they kind of
suck, and you probably shouldn't do them often.

On the other hand, I absolutely *love* doing run-bike workouts. I like to run
for an hour, then bike for an hour. I feel like I get the big endurance workout
out of it without the pain of running after biking.

What do other people think? Are there any particular reasons to do or avoid
such a workout?

-Harold

 
 
 

Bike-Run vs. Run-Bike workouts?

Post by SGert974 » Thu, 04 Jan 2001 12:50:54

I think that doing bike-run workouts helps to adapt to that uncomfortable
transition stiffness.  I find that as I have done more of these work outs the
stiffness does not last as long.  Stan

 
 
 

Bike-Run vs. Run-Bike workouts?

Post by gordo byr » Thu, 04 Jan 2001 12:57:37

Hi Harold -

Swim - Bike - Run

In 2000, I did 2-5 Bike-Run workouts every week.  No ill effects, just
improved running off the bike is races.

I also did bike - run - bike - runs when I was travelling and training in
Hotel gyms.  Kept the boredom factor down.

Cheers,

gordo

 
 
 

Bike-Run vs. Run-Bike workouts?

Post by John Walter » Thu, 04 Jan 2001 13:27:41

Harold -
Who warned you against bike-run workouts, aka 'bricks'?  They help you become
comfortable with the stiffness many get transitioning from the bike to the run.
One variation is to set up your bike trainer next to a track and do repeats of
bike/run, bike/run, etc.
No one ever seems to worry too much about the swim-bike transition; too much of a
bother to get out of the pool and onto a trainer, then back in the pool, etc.  Gets
the bike too wet!
Avoid run-bike workouts?  No.  Embrace?  Yes!
John
Quote:

> I often hear people warn against doing bike-run workouts. I agree, they kind of
> suck, and you probably shouldn't do them often.

> On the other hand, I absolutely *love* doing run-bike workouts. I like to run
> for an hour, then bike for an hour. I feel like I get the big endurance workout
> out of it without the pain of running after biking.

> What do other people think? Are there any particular reasons to do or avoid
> such a workout?

> -Harold

 
 
 

Bike-Run vs. Run-Bike workouts?

Post by John Walter » Thu, 04 Jan 2001 13:34:30

I meant the last line to say:
Avoid bike-run workouts?  No.  Embrace?  Yes!
Sorry -
John
Quote:

> Harold -
> Who warned you against bike-run workouts, aka 'bricks'?  They help you become
> comfortable with the stiffness many get transitioning from the bike to the run.
> One variation is to set up your bike trainer next to a track and do repeats of
> bike/run, bike/run, etc.
> No one ever seems to worry too much about the swim-bike transition; too much of a
> bother to get out of the pool and onto a trainer, then back in the pool, etc.  Gets
> the bike too wet!
> Avoid run-bike workouts?  No.  Embrace?  Yes!
> John


> > I often hear people warn against doing bike-run workouts. I agree, they kind of
> > suck, and you probably shouldn't do them often.

> > On the other hand, I absolutely *love* doing run-bike workouts. I like to run
> > for an hour, then bike for an hour. I feel like I get the big endurance workout
> > out of it without the pain of running after biking.

> > What do other people think? Are there any particular reasons to do or avoid
> > such a workout?

> > -Harold

 
 
 

Bike-Run vs. Run-Bike workouts?

Post by Ken » Thu, 04 Jan 2001 15:30:20

Bike-run workouts adapt your body/mind to the triathlon process.    You can
do triathlons without them, however, your perceived suffering will be
exaggerated.      It's possible to loosen up on the bike prior to T2 and be
ready to run.   What you can't do is adjust your mind to the motion
difference.   Only performing bricks (bike-run) will adapt your body and
mind to the feel.    On the bike you see the ground moving swiftly by under
your wheels.   When you start your run the ground is moving slow relative to
what it was on the bike .    Your mind tells you that you are running to
slow and therefore you compensate by trying to run faster than you should.
Most likely that first mile feels so bad because you are just pushing too
hard do to the speed differential.   Adding bricks to your program adapts
your mind to that difference and teaches proper pace.

If you are seriously going to compete in triathlon, then you must train
triathlon.   Swim -bike,  bike-run every time you get the chance.   Most
important is that first mile off the bike.  Do a mile every time you get off
the bike and Amaze Yourself at how easy it will become.


Quote:
> I often hear people warn against doing bike-run workouts. I agree, they
kind of
> suck, and you probably shouldn't do them often.

> On the other hand, I absolutely *love* doing run-bike workouts. I like to
run
> for an hour, then bike for an hour. I feel like I get the big endurance
workout
> out of it without the pain of running after biking.

> What do other people think? Are there any particular reasons to do or
avoid
> such a workout?

> -Harold

 
 
 

Bike-Run vs. Run-Bike workouts?

Post by HaroldBu » Fri, 05 Jan 2001 00:05:01

I should have elaborated a bit more. The warnings I've gotten about Bike-Run
workouts are they they are more likely to lead to injury if done often and at
high intensity.

I agree that it's important to do these occasionally to get used to the
feeling. If I hadn't done these before my first triathlon I would have been
hating that run, but I knew if I kept moving the legs would feel better after a
mile or so.

So, while I do intend to do some bike-run workouts (one every week or so), I
like to do run-bike workouts more often.

-Harold

 
 
 

Bike-Run vs. Run-Bike workouts?

Post by Larry Himme » Fri, 05 Jan 2001 01:33:20

Quote:

> What do other people think? Are there any particular reasons to do or avoid
> such a workout?

> -Harold

The run-bike does not accomplish the primary goal of a true brick.  Getting on a
bike after running is almost like a rest because your legs no longer have to
support the weight of your body.  Running after cycling forces your already tired
legs to support your body weight while producing forward motion.   The latter is
definitely more difficult.

I think bricks are fine for training.  You're going to do it in a triathlon anyway,
you might as well be prepared.  They're probably best done at medium effort,
especially when you first start doing them.

Larry

 
 
 

Bike-Run vs. Run-Bike workouts?

Post by TriathRon Gilcreas » Fri, 05 Jan 2001 02:49:54



Quote:
> What you can't do is adjust your mind to the motion
> difference.   Only performing bricks (bike-run) will adapt your body
and
> mind to the feel.    On the bike you see the ground moving swiftly by
under
> your wheels.   When you start your run the ground is moving slow
relative to
> what it was on the bike .    Your mind tells you that you are running
to
> slow and therefore you compensate by trying to run faster than you
should.
> Most likely that first mile feels so bad because you are just pushing
too
> hard do to the speed differential.

This is an angle I'd never considered  . . . thx Ken!

Sent via Deja.com
http://www.deja.com/

 
 
 

Bike-Run vs. Run-Bike workouts?

Post by Wayn » Fri, 05 Jan 2001 08:23:22

Harold,

Maybe the person (persons) giving you that advice are worried
that with some brick training you will be kicking their buts
come race day.  They work for me!  Keep them in perspective
though, you can over do them.

Good luck,

Wayne

| I often hear people warn against doing bike-run workouts. I
agree, they kind of
| suck, and you probably shouldn't do them often.
|
| On the other hand, I absolutely *love* doing run-bike
workouts. I like to run
| for an hour, then bike for an hour. I feel like I get the big
endurance workout
| out of it without the pain of running after biking.
|
| What do other people think? Are there any particular reasons
to do or avoid
| such a workout?
|
| -Harold

 
 
 

Bike-Run vs. Run-Bike workouts?

Post by Sandy & Joh » Sat, 06 Jan 2001 22:02:55

I am not an experienced triathlete, but I am a master of injury from running, and I
have an opinion to share.

The posters are right, bricks are an essential training method.  But I can see how
some people would say that Bricks are dangerous as it is easy to overdo it and
overtrain thus lead to an injury.  In other words if you choose to do a brick on
the weekend, when I presume you'll be focusing on building endurance,  you might
ride for 4 hours and then run for 1 or more hours.   Just take a word from the
weekend warrior to focus on slow distance, don't overdo the intensity.  Weekday
bricks can be of higher intensity providing the duration is relatively short.  The
purpose of the brick is to teach the body to adjust to the transition from one
repetitive movement to another, and it could be potentially harmful if not treated
with a little sanity. Don't cycle with the local hammer heads for 80 miles and then
go running with the local track club, unless you've built up to it and feel that
your body can handle the added stresses.
john

Quote:

> I should have elaborated a bit more. The warnings I've gotten about Bike-Run
> workouts are they they are more likely to lead to injury if done often and at
> high intensity.

> I agree that it's important to do these occasionally to get used to the
> feeling. If I hadn't done these before my first triathlon I would have been
> hating that run, but I knew if I kept moving the legs would feel better after a
> mile or so.

> So, while I do intend to do some bike-run workouts (one every week or so), I
> like to do run-bike workouts more often.

> -Harold

 
 
 

Bike-Run vs. Run-Bike workouts?

Post by gordo byr » Mon, 08 Jan 2001 06:01:44

John -

Good points.

I never run long off the bike because of the risk of injury.  For me, the
purpose of the brick is to teach my body to switch.  Once it has switched,
20-30 mins, I am done with the session.

Cheers,

gordo