Men vs. Women: an interseting (?) statistic

Men vs. Women: an interseting (?) statistic

Post by d.. » Wed, 10 Nov 1993 01:31:19


Quote:

> Monday's Times reported results of the World Cup marathon and of the Hawaii Ironman. And it is of interest to note the time differences between the men's and women's winners.

> Marathon:  Men:    Richard Nerurkar (GB):    2:10:03
>            Women:  Wang Junxia (China):      2:28:16

>            Women's winner 14.0% slower

> Ironman:   Men:    Mark Allen (USA):         8:07:45
>            Women:  Paula Newby-Fraser (Zim): 8:58:23

>            Women's winner 10.4% slower

> James Tappin,              School of Physics & Space Research
>                    University of Birmingham

Interesting.
However, I bet this discepancy might be explained on the fact that women
are not that disadvantanged with men in long distance swimming, due to their
extra body fat.  The differences in the swimming split would be especially
revealing.
-Derrick
 
 
 

Men vs. Women: an interseting (?) statistic

Post by Tom Carmina » Wed, 10 Nov 1993 04:47:33


Quote:


> > Monday's Times reported results of the World Cup marathon and of the Hawaii Ironman. And it is of interest to note the time differences between the men's and women's winners.

> > Marathon:     Men:    Richard Nerurkar (GB):    2:10:03
> >               Women:  Wang Junxia (China):      2:28:16

> >               Women's winner 14.0% slower

> > Ironman:      Men:    Mark Allen (USA):         8:07:45
> >               Women:  Paula Newby-Fraser (Zim): 8:58:23

> >               Women's winner 10.4% slower

> > James Tappin,         School of Physics & Space Research
> >                       University of Birmingham
> Interesting.
> However, I bet this discepancy might be explained on the fact that women
> are not that disadvantanged with men in long distance swimming, due to their
> extra body fat.  The differences in the swimming split would be especially
> revealing.
> -Derrick

A possible explanation is that Paula Newby-Fraser is an exceptional
athlete.  Does the trend hold if you go 5 or 10 deep in the top finishers?

Tom Carminati
U S WEST Advanced Technologies


 
 
 

Men vs. Women: an interseting (?) statistic

Post by Joseph A. McVei » Thu, 11 Nov 1993 00:09:50

Quote:


>>Marathon:      Men:    Richard Nerurkar (GB):    2:10:03
>>               Women:  Wang Junxia (China):      2:28:16

>>               Women's winner 14.0% slower

>>Ironman:       Men:    Mark Allen (USA):         8:07:45
>>               Women:  Paula Newby-Fraser (Zim): 8:58:23

>>               Women's winner 10.4% slower

>1.  Women have more body fat than men.  This is an advantage in the
>swim, has little effect on the bike, and a disadvantage in the run.

>2.  For swimming and biking, power increases with the cube of velocity,
>which means you need 3% more power to go 1% faster.  For running, power
>is proportional to velocity.

>3.  Performance in events over 3 hours depends less on aerobic capacity
>and more on the ability to metabolize stored fat and food eaten during
>the race.  Here men have less of an advantage.

Matt provides a great argument for the larger gap in the running events,
but I can't help thinking that an appreciable amount of that 14% gap in
the marathon times ais attributable to the fact that Wang wasn't running
very hard. (I guess I'm showing my colors as a Wang "True Believer.")

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Men vs. Women: an interseting (?) statistic

Post by gordon k chace x23 » Fri, 12 Nov 1993 01:26:32


...
|> Matt provides a great argument for the larger gap in the running events,
|> but I can't help thinking that an appreciable amount of that 14% gap in
|> the marathon times ais attributable to the fact that Wang wasn't running
|> very hard. (I guess I'm showing my colors as a Wang "True Believer.")

Indeed, if you compare the all-time world fastest times, 2:07 versus
2:21 (rounding to closest minute) we see 11%.  And I think that 10 to 12
percent is typical for WR at a lot of T&F distances.  What I find interesting
is that when you compare the peaks of the bell curves (ie, the 50-th
percentiles for men and women) in high-population marathons, you usually get
about 3:35 to 3:40 and 3:55 to 4:00 which is the same ratio of pacing speed
as for the elite's world records.

Now we can combine two of the Flame Wars From Hell, when is a Chinese
woman jogging versus running.

--
Gordon K. Chace                                 voice (612) 482-6524
OpenVision Technologies, Inc.                   fax   (612) 482-2697

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