"Tri" bike vs. "Road" bike

"Tri" bike vs. "Road" bike

Post by None » Tue, 26 Nov 2002 12:45:15


I have been a cyclist and triathlete on and off for almost 10 years now.  I
currently own an aging old style touring bike that I do everything from
shopping for groceries, to this fall's day out doing the IMC bike course to
multi-week bike tours.  There are some gaps though.  It IS getting old and
not as reliable as it used to be.  It is also not all it could be for racing
and just long day rides (say over 100k).

My previous racing bike that I did IMC with was a Cannondale "tri" bike, but
when I got injured I sold it to a friend.

The time has come to get a new bike.  How do I pick between getting a "tri"
bike and a "road" bike?  I can only afford one at the moment and am unsure
how to proceed.  On the one hand I'll mostly use it for rides with my wife
ranging from 40 to 150k (and longer if my knee will hold out - I have
chronic problems).  But I haven't ruled out going back to triathlons and
even Ironman distances again.  In either case I'm FAR from an elite racer.
A 12 hour IM would be outstanding, but very unlikely.  A 5 hour century
while nice would be a long shot, especially if there was a nice bakery or
market along the way.

So how do I pick?  What really is the difference?  I know that tri bikes
tend to be steeper and understand some of the pros and cons of this, but
what about just getting a road bike with a reversible seatpost and some
aerobars?  What about just riding a road bike and not bothering with
aerobars at all?  Are there other considerations?

Thanx,

Pain in the knee.

 
 
 

"Tri" bike vs. "Road" bike

Post by Mark Hicke » Tue, 26 Nov 2002 23:08:45

Pardon the top posting, but I wanted to keep your original message
intact because it's about the most compelling case for buying a road
bike I've seen.  

Your mission statement has almost nothing about racing in triathlons
in it, and it's obvious that you're not going to obsess over the
possibility you may lose a couple seconds per mile if you're on a road
bike.

Given how you'll use the bike, the answer is easy.  Get a road bike -
one with reasonably "normal" angles for quick, but not twitchy
handling.  

Mark Hickey
Habanero Cycles
http://www.habcycles.com
Home of the $695 ti frame

Quote:

>I have been a cyclist and triathlete on and off for almost 10 years now.  I
>currently own an aging old style touring bike that I do everything from
>shopping for groceries, to this fall's day out doing the IMC bike course to
>multi-week bike tours.  There are some gaps though.  It IS getting old and
>not as reliable as it used to be.  It is also not all it could be for racing
>and just long day rides (say over 100k).

>My previous racing bike that I did IMC with was a Cannondale "tri" bike, but
>when I got injured I sold it to a friend.

>The time has come to get a new bike.  How do I pick between getting a "tri"
>bike and a "road" bike?  I can only afford one at the moment and am unsure
>how to proceed.  On the one hand I'll mostly use it for rides with my wife
>ranging from 40 to 150k (and longer if my knee will hold out - I have
>chronic problems).  But I haven't ruled out going back to triathlons and
>even Ironman distances again.  In either case I'm FAR from an elite racer.
>A 12 hour IM would be outstanding, but very unlikely.  A 5 hour century
>while nice would be a long shot, especially if there was a nice bakery or
>market along the way.

>So how do I pick?  What really is the difference?  I know that tri bikes
>tend to be steeper and understand some of the pros and cons of this, but
>what about just getting a road bike with a reversible seatpost and some
>aerobars?  What about just riding a road bike and not bothering with
>aerobars at all?  Are there other considerations?

>Thanx,

>Pain in the knee.


 
 
 

"Tri" bike vs. "Road" bike

Post by Mike S » Wed, 27 Nov 2002 02:33:26

...and you can always put a Control Tech seatpost on the bike too.  Unlike
most seatposts, you can switch the Control Tech around and still use it.
With the addition of an aero bar, it makes a normal road bike into a forward
position tri bike without any other modifications.


Quote:
> Pardon the top posting, but I wanted to keep your original message
> intact because it's about the most compelling case for buying a road
> bike I've seen.

> Your mission statement has almost nothing about racing in triathlons
> in it, and it's obvious that you're not going to obsess over the
> possibility you may lose a couple seconds per mile if you're on a road
> bike.

> Given how you'll use the bike, the answer is easy.  Get a road bike -
> one with reasonably "normal" angles for quick, but not twitchy
> handling.

> Mark Hickey
> Habanero Cycles
> http://www.habcycles.com
> Home of the $695 ti frame


> >I have been a cyclist and triathlete on and off for almost 10 years now.
I
> >currently own an aging old style touring bike that I do everything from
> >shopping for groceries, to this fall's day out doing the IMC bike course
to
> >multi-week bike tours.  There are some gaps though.  It IS getting old
and
> >not as reliable as it used to be.  It is also not all it could be for
racing
> >and just long day rides (say over 100k).

> >My previous racing bike that I did IMC with was a Cannondale "tri" bike,
but
> >when I got injured I sold it to a friend.

> >The time has come to get a new bike.  How do I pick between getting a
"tri"
> >bike and a "road" bike?  I can only afford one at the moment and am
unsure
> >how to proceed.  On the one hand I'll mostly use it for rides with my
wife
> >ranging from 40 to 150k (and longer if my knee will hold out - I have
> >chronic problems).  But I haven't ruled out going back to triathlons and
> >even Ironman distances again.  In either case I'm FAR from an elite
racer.
> >A 12 hour IM would be outstanding, but very unlikely.  A 5 hour century
> >while nice would be a long shot, especially if there was a nice bakery or
> >market along the way.

> >So how do I pick?  What really is the difference?  I know that tri bikes
> >tend to be steeper and understand some of the pros and cons of this, but
> >what about just getting a road bike with a reversible seatpost and some
> >aerobars?  What about just riding a road bike and not bothering with
> >aerobars at all?  Are there other considerations?

> >Thanx,

> >Pain in the knee.