Work or train? Part 2

Work or train? Part 2

Post by laning » Sun, 14 Feb 1999 04:00:00


Well, I returned home last night after a 20 hour plane ride and a 14 hour
time zone shift.  I leave tomorrow night for 4 more domestic flights in 3
days.  I have more air time than pilots, and my job doesn't start till I
arrive.

So far, in February I have run 8 miles, swam zero, and biked 45.  Darn!  I'm
starting to think that training is easier on the body that this stuff.  And
the beat goes on....

John

 
 
 

Work or train? Part 2

Post by David Barcl » Sun, 14 Feb 1999 04:00:00

        A couple suggestions for you John, as it is obvious that you
travel far more than the rest of us:

Swimming: Swim in the airline coffee cup. A bit of a tight squeeze, but
well worth the effort. It is about the same temperature as the pool, and in
its weakened state, similiar to clorine. But don't tell the stewardess
what you are doing, They just don't understand.

Biking: To easy. Attach your bike and trainer to the wing and peddle away.
You will be able to perfect you aero-position, or die in the process.

Running: Just run up and down the aisle. You can practice for the XTERRA
races during turbulance. Vault over the drink cart for maximum effect.

Weights: You know that 300 pounder sitting next to you. Two words, Bench
Press!

        Well, I hope this helps you training. If I was a frequent flier, I
know it would help me.

Quote:

> Well, I returned home last night after a 20 hour plane ride and a 14 hour
> time zone shift.  I leave tomorrow night for 4 more domestic flights in 3
> days.  I have more air time than pilots, and my job doesn't start till I
> arrive.
> So far, in February I have run 8 miles, swam zero, and biked 45.  Darn!  I'm
> starting to think that training is easier on the body that this stuff.  And
> the beat goes on....
> John

David Barclay

Ironman Lanzarote 1999
Triathlon: "Swim, Bike, Crawl"

 
 
 

Work or train? Part 2

Post by Joe Foste » Sun, 14 Feb 1999 04:00:00

Hi John,

Caught round one of "work or train" while in the middle of corporate restructure
meetings and could not reply. Reading your post this morning brings back
memories of my days commuting to Asia. Though I have always traveled with my
work, and to this day board a plane every week, there is no equivalent none, to
the 2 years in which I split my life across the Pacific: 3 weeks over, 2 weeks
home, 2 weeks over, 3 weeks home . . .  Here are some poorly organized thoughts
on the subject of travel that may help you:

Adjust your expectations for "success" in triathlon to reflect the realities of
your health and training. *Redefine* the sport in terms of what "triathlon" is
to you, so that your expectations align to a definition based in physical
reality.

   * At the time I began the international aspect of my work I had just taken up
     Triathlon and was filled with the wide-eyed exuberance of all newcomers
     that "fall" for this sport. My newcomer status was a blessing in that my
     triathlon goals were aligned to those of most newcomers. I wanted to simply
     learn the basics, enjoy training for enjoyment sake, find "health" and to
     race an occasional race. As a novice my focus was sprints, I completed one
     race that was near Olympic distances. This distance was appropriate given
     my ability to train and the exhaustion that is a by product of travel. My
     newcomer status was a blessing for the reason that my *expectations* for
     success in the sport were much different than they are now.

   * Training on the road is difficult, the opportunity for distraction is high,
     the obstacles to train are large, they are very real. With international
     travel, additional barriers are established. My strategy is to I have *no*
     expectation of training to a certain number, formula, discipline, or
     distance while on the road. My experience is that if you do you will fail -
     there is no reason to. My philosophy is that all training that occurs on
     the road falls under the heading of "bonus miles." It is all success, John.
     If it is 8 miles, "BRAVO!" If it is a 30 minute fast walk around Kansai
     between flights, "Bravo!" If I did not get a work out in, well, it is
     recovery and therefore: Success! Redefine success in training so that you
     succeed not fail.

 Find beauty. Find good.

     John, take the time to enjoy the opportunity to explore the world around
     you while on this kind of travel. I have been through all the emotional
     phases of travel. From exuberance to absolute hate and resentment. Always a
     companion was remorse for not being . . . "there". . . travelers with
     family will know for which I write.  I have witnessed those who lead a dual
     life - literally transformation from a m***being to player in the "dark
     side" of travel opportunities. I have been the grim faced road veteran
     during which I would ignore all surroundings and lived a life of "plane,
     work, hotel, room service, home." In my 10th  year of travel I learned from
     now a dear friend  who was then a veteran of 30 years of travel how to
     really travel - the solution was to find beauty and find good in every
     place you go. Find some pleasure that adds value to your life. Take some
     time, be it a day to soak up the local color or ten minutes to chat with
     the front desk attendant about the area in which that you are traveling.
     This is where you can marry, in a most wonderful and exciting way, training
     to travel. Though the costs of international work were high, higher than I
     would ever choose to pay again, I do have wonderful memories of running
     through Seoul early in the morning up the hill to Seoul tower,  racing a
     Japanese runner as we peeled off fast laps around the Akasaka Palace,
     "merging in" for a several miles of a marathon, accidentally discovered
     while running in Guam. I recall the faces of countless old women, men and
     children laughing at the big, white sweaty Gai Jin running through many
     different asian countries, countless villages, market places, atolls . . .
     Adventure and discovery, John, is always around the corner whether you are
     in Tong Du Shon or Bloomington. Beauty is everywhere, good is in the hearts
     of most. Both are easily found when you are as exposed as you are when you
     run. Wrap yourself in the local character whenever the opportunity presents
     itself - search it out with vigor and purpose and you will find unexpected
     reward.

Miscellaneous:

   * Culture shock is real. A move from prolonged periods with one culture to
     the another is not easy
   * There is no miracle cure for jet lag, but time
   * 4 flights in 3 days will allow you zero time to work out - don't expect to
   * Expect delays and they will not upset you
   * Carry your own head phones
   * Channel 9 is the one the pilots talk on
   * Look the service people in the eye
   * Be flexible
   * A credit card can heal any travel woe
   * Cash is overrated
   * In the US: Carry-on, carry-on, carry-on . . .
   * In Asia you can let them take the luggage, if you like, they are skilled in
     it's handling.
   * Appropriate "Gifting" in Asia will get you a MUCH better hotel room and a
     lifetime of excellent service
   * Don't buy products that have pricing that is too good to be true (Rolex's
     are not $18, even in the Itaewon district)
   * Eat healthy or you will get fat - quickly!
   * Sushi is your waistlines friend
   * There is Starbucks in Japan
   * With the exception of Starbucks <g>  -  eat local
   * Sometimes it is better to just enjoy your meal rather than to know it's
     composition
   * Luggage stores will now interest you like never before
   * Briggs & Reily is the best buy in luggage
   * The only people who desire "god status" (i.e. 1K, MVP Gold . . . ) with the
     airlines are the one's who have not flown the miles to earn it
   * Pack energy bars to snack on
   * Don't be a cultural bigot - our values are not universal
   * Invest in at least one airline clubroom
   * Call home everyday with out fail
   * Send your wife flowers on each prolonged trip (7 days +)
   * Turn over all "true rewards" points to your wife in the form of a surprise
     ( Note: Cindy will be at Saks today droping the $500 gift certificate that
     is a reward redemption  for points earned  . . . And, *no* it has nothing
     to do with Valentines Day - it is separate)
   * Training *is* easier than travel
   * Quit when it is time to quit and wait not a second longer

While I no longer travel over sea's I do, as stated, travel every week - I
employ my plan to great success and road happiness. This coming week I am in
Newport Beach (CA) I have a full work schedule, but will reward myself with a
(always) lovely run around the Back Bays to, and around, Balboa then home ...
err ... the Sheraton. If I have time I may swim early in morning at the "Y" -
maybe not . . . I'll have sashimi and a salad at the Blue Marlin for dinner.
Breakfast is always Starbucks on McArthur and a Brueggers Bagel next door. I'm
known to through my bike in the cargo hold of the plane if I'm going to be
stationary for 2 nights . . .always though I take some time for beauty.

Good Luck, John, Find Balance . . .

Joe

Quote:

> Well, I returned home last night after a 20 hour plane ride and a 14 hour
> time zone shift.  I leave tomorrow night for 4 more domestic flights in 3
> days.  I have more air time than pilots, and my job doesn't start till I
> arrive.

> So far, in February I have run 8 miles, swam zero, and biked 45.  Darn!  I'm
> starting to think that training is easier on the body that this stuff.  And
> the beat goes on....

> John


 
 
 

Work or train? Part 2

Post by Iron Pe » Sun, 14 Feb 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

>    A couple suggestions for you John, as it is obvious that you
>travel far more than the rest of us:

>Swimming: Swim in the airline coffee cup. A bit of a tight squeeze, but
>well worth the effort. It is about the same temperature as the pool, and in
>its weakened state, similiar to clorine. But don't tell the stewardess
>what you are doing, They just don't understand.

>Biking: To easy. Attach your bike and trainer to the wing and peddle away.
>You will be able to perfect you aero-position, or die in the process.

>Running: Just run up and down the aisle. You can practice for the XTERRA
>races during turbulance. Vault over the drink cart for maximum effect.

>Weights: You know that 300 pounder sitting next to you. Two words, Bench
>Press!

>    Well, I hope this helps you training. If I was a frequent flier, I
>know it would help me.

>David Barclay

>Ironman Lanzarote 1999
>Triathlon: "Swim, Bike, Crawl"

Too funny man. I was cracking up big time. :-)

"Iron Pete" Priolo        +--------+
                          |26      |
IMC'96: 10:36:37          |   Fe   |   IMNZ, IMC '99
IMC'97: 10:42:53          |        |
                          +--------+
                 "THE BEST ELEMENT OF RACING"

 
 
 

Work or train? Part 2

Post by David Barcl » Sun, 14 Feb 1999 04:00:00

        Make that "Airplane," not Aiplane. See header. A thousand lashings
with a wet spagetti noddle for my grammar transgression.

How do you spell that "g" word? Grammer or grammar? ;)

David Barclay

Ironman Lanzarote 1999
Triathlon: "Swim, Bike, Crawl"

 
 
 

Work or train? Part 2

Post by Grant Beaupre » Mon, 15 Feb 1999 04:00:00

Quote:
> Find beauty. Find good.

Well said Joe!  We should all take a bit more time to see the beauty in
things, whether we are traveling or staying at home.

BTW, when were you on guam?  I live on Guam and have done that damn
marathon 2x.  One of the toughest marathons in the Pacific!

Quote:
> merging in" for several miles of a marathon, accidentally discovered while running in Guam.

Train hard,

Grant from Guam

 
 
 

Work or train? Part 2

Post by jamesfr.. » Mon, 15 Feb 1999 04:00:00

If there's one thing that bugs me, it's when people get off on grammar. I
sucked at it all through school, yet somehow, I ended up an English major in
college. My point? At least pretend you're not so anal, and let the grammar
errors slide. Errant keystrokes aren't all too uncommon. Allright? (note the
mispelling? Good, you get a gold star.)

-----------== Posted via Deja News, The Discussion Network ==----------
http://www.dejanews.com/       Search, Read, Discuss, or Start Your Own