cyclist wants to know about aero-postion - seems inefficient

cyclist wants to know about aero-postion - seems inefficient

Post by ChrisC52 » Sun, 04 May 1997 04:00:00


I am a road-racing  cyclist getting acquainted with the tri-way of doing
things and have some questions for experienced tri bike riders.

1.  I threw some profile air-strike bars on my bike and tried riding.  How
far forward on my forearms do I want to be resting?  I seemed so far
forward that I felt I needed to move my seat up - is this the case, and if
so by how much?  What is my optimal knee-cap over pedal spindle postion?
Do I need to tilt my saddle nose down for this new position? I was getting
a little groin/crotch workout that I didn't want.

2.  How about stem height in the case above?

3.  With my elbows (and consequently shoulders) so close together my
breathing seemed restricted.  Is this normal?

4.  In the new position am I using different parts of my muscles than in a
road racing position?  I felt weak and unable to transmit a lot of power
to my legs.

Thanks for your help

               Regards

               Chris Crawford

 
 
 

cyclist wants to know about aero-postion - seems inefficient

Post by m e johnso » Sun, 04 May 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> I am a road-racing  cyclist getting acquainted with the tri-way of doing
> things and have some questions for experienced tri bike riders.

> 1.  I threw some profile air-strike bars on my bike and tried riding.  How
> far forward on my forearms do I want to be resting?  I seemed so far
> forward that I felt I needed to move my seat up - is this the case, and if
> so by how much?  What is my optimal knee-cap over pedal spindle postion?
> Do I need to tilt my saddle nose down for this new position? I was getting
> a little groin/crotch workout that I didn't want.

> 2.  How about stem height in the case above?

> 3.  With my elbows (and consequently shoulders) so close together my
> breathing seemed restricted.  Is this normal?

> 4.  In the new position am I using different parts of my muscles than in a
> road racing position?  I felt weak and unable to transmit a lot of power
> to my legs.

> Thanks for your help

>                Regards

>                Chris Crawford

You might find some helpful information on the webpage
put together by the people at Quintana Roo (QR), a manufacturer
of tri-specific (among other) bikes.

The QR web page can be found at http://www.webcom.com/rooworld

Their page on "Bike Fit & Set-up" is
http://www.webcom.com/rooworld/fit_set-up.html

Hope this helps!

-Mark Johnson

 
 
 

cyclist wants to know about aero-postion - seems inefficient

Post by TriD » Mon, 05 May 1997 04:00:00


says...

Quote:

>I am a road-racing  cyclist getting acquainted with the tri-way of doing
>things and have some questions for experienced tri bike riders.

>1.  I threw some profile air-strike bars on my bike and tried riding.  How
>far forward on my forearms do I want to be resting?  I seemed so far
>forward that I felt I needed to move my seat up - is this the case, and if
>so by how much?  What is my optimal knee-cap over pedal spindle postion?
>Do I need to tilt my saddle nose down for this new position? I was getting
>a little groin/crotch workout that I didn't want.

Typically one wants to rest on the half of the forearm that is nearest the
elbow.  typically on a road frame, one either pushes the seat forward or goes
with a forward seatpost.  As to knee to spindle positioning, I don't know. And
tipping the seat forward a bit is normal, some guys will ride with a womens
saddle for extra comfort.  I am considering it.

Quote:
>2.  How about stem height in the case above?

I use the same stem height as I do in a road position.  The arm pads are
typically elevated just fine for me.  Apparently higher towers can be added.

Quote:
>3.  With my elbows (and consequently shoulders) so close together my
>breathing seemed restricted.  Is this normal?

No, I would suggest that you try adapting to a wider position first.

Quote:
>4.  In the new position am I using different parts of my muscles than in a
>road racing position?  I felt weak and unable to transmit a lot of power
>to my legs.

Yes, your legs are pushing differently.  I forget the details at this time, but
I believe that the hamstring come more into play.

---
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Ironman Canada 1998
Rob Blomquist aka TriDog
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