IM Vets: When do you know that you know

IM Vets: When do you know that you know

Post by gw » Sun, 14 May 2000 04:00:00


I'll be ready for Muncie in July, but readiness for first
IM distance at GFT seems like a long shot.  The challenge
is I'll have to make a decision by the end of May.  Swim is
at 2400 meters x2 weekly, Long Bike is at 40, Long Run is
at 14.  Total training time per week 7-8 hrs.  I'll get to
10-12hrs/week over the next couple of months.  Given my
other commitments 10-12 hrs/week is about my time limit.

Goals: Keep training, stay healthy, recover quickly after
races, keep the long view in focus.

I'm clear that I want health over completing IM distance
before I'm ready.  I dislocated a patella years ago, and
along with it lost most of the cartlidge.  That I can train
at all has been an incredible gift -- glucosamine has been
a godsend.

Will I know that I know?  Or is it just a matter of just
Doing It?

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IM Vets: When do you know that you know

Post by Iron Pe » Mon, 15 May 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>I'll be ready for Muncie in July, but readiness for first
>IM distance at GFT seems like a long shot.  The challenge
>is I'll have to make a decision by the end of May.  Swim is
>at 2400 meters x2 weekly, Long Bike is at 40, Long Run is
>at 14.  Total training time per week 7-8 hrs.  I'll get to
>10-12hrs/week over the next couple of months.  Given my
>other commitments 10-12 hrs/week is about my time limit.

>Goals: Keep training, stay healthy, recover quickly after
>races, keep the long view in focus.

>I'm clear that I want health over completing IM distance
>before I'm ready.  I dislocated a patella years ago, and
>along with it lost most of the cartlidge.  That I can train
>at all has been an incredible gift -- glucosamine has been
>a godsend.

>Will I know that I know?  Or is it just a matter of just
>Doing It?

10-12 hours. I know some people who finished an Ironman race with a lot less in
the bank. If nothing happens, I'm certainly very sure you're ready to make the
"leap of faith". Because that is what it is, a leap of faith (or leap of
stupidity, as some humorous triathletes have told me ;-). If you were to
interview any triathlete the week leading up to their first Iron-distance race,
about almost all would say that they are not ready for it.

Anyway, your focus right now is to try to build a little more of your distances
on your long workouts. Try to see if you can build up to 80 miles in one
session on your bike. The run looks fine, but if you have the time, you can
build there also for some bonus points. :-)

I know you're worried about health. Remember, you're not going for a time out
there, you're going with the intention of finishing. That's a big difference.
If you treat race day as a long-slow distance training session with a couple of
photo-ops in between, this will give you a positive attitude, a big advantage
when finishing races like these. Bottom line is to have fun out there during
the day. That should be your intention.

As I said, almost nobody here feels like they are ever ready for their first
Ironman. Sometimes it just takes that leap of faith to enter and to finish. :-)

"Iron Pete" Priolo        +--------+
                          |26      |
IMC'96: 10:36:37          |   Fe   |   IMCAL, IMC Y2K
IMC'99: 10:45:03          |        |
                          +--------+
                 "THE BEST ELEMENT OF RACING"

 
 
 

IM Vets: When do you know that you know

Post by Mike Schwin » Mon, 15 May 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
> 10-12 hours. I know some people who finished an Ironman race with a lot
less in
> the bank. If nothing happens, I'm certainly very sure you're ready to make
the
> "leap of faith". Because that is what it is, a leap of faith (or leap of
> stupidity, as some humorous triathletes have told me ;-). If you were to
> interview any triathlete the week leading up to their first Iron-distance
race,
> about almost all would say that they are not ready for it.

True. Poor Coach Troy, I can't tell you how many times I bothered him for
reassurance in the weeks before Lake Placid last year. He kept saying - if
you can do a half, you can do the whole thing. It's just a lot longer -
you're well trained, you'll do fine. (HA!) I believed him, showed up and
finished just fine.

Quote:
> As I said, almost nobody here feels like they are ever ready for their
first
> Ironman. Sometimes it just takes that leap of faith to enter and to

finish. :-)

Well, it takes a leap of faith in order to enter, but it takes a whole lot
of work and determination to finish. The leap is the start though.

You can do it, take Pete's suggestions, he's got a lot of experience.

Mike Schwing
IMUSA 99'

Quote:

> "Iron Pete" Priolo        +--------+
>                           |26      |
> IMC'96: 10:36:37          |   Fe   |   IMCAL, IMC Y2K
> IMC'99: 10:45:03          |        |
>                           +--------+
>                  "THE BEST ELEMENT OF RACING"


 
 
 

IM Vets: When do you know that you know

Post by Marty Carso » Tue, 16 May 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> >I'll be ready for Muncie in July, but readiness for first
> >IM distance at GFT seems like a long shot.  The challenge
> >is I'll have to make a decision by the end of May.  Swim is
> >at 2400 meters x2 weekly, Long Bike is at 40, Long Run is
> >at 14.  Total training time per week 7-8 hrs.  I'll get to
> >10-12hrs/week over the next couple of months.  Given my
> >other commitments 10-12 hrs/week is about my time limit.

> >Goals: Keep training, stay healthy, recover quickly after
> >races, keep the long view in focus.

> >I'm clear that I want health over completing IM distance
> >before I'm ready.  I dislocated a patella years ago, and
> >along with it lost most of the cartlidge.  That I can train
> >at all has been an incredible gift -- glucosamine has been
> >a godsend.

> >Will I know that I know?  Or is it just a matter of just
> >Doing It?

> 10-12 hours. I know some people who finished an Ironman race with a lot less in
> the bank. If nothing happens, I'm certainly very sure you're ready to make the
> "leap of faith". Because that is what it is, a leap of faith (or leap of
> stupidity, as some humorous triathletes have told me ;-). If you were to
> interview any triathlete the week leading up to their first Iron-distance race,
> about almost all would say that they are not ready for it.

> Anyway, your focus right now is to try to build a little more of your distances
> on your long workouts. Try to see if you can build up to 80 miles in one
> session on your bike. The run looks fine, but if you have the time, you can
> build there also for some bonus points. :-)

> I know you're worried about health. Remember, you're not going for a time out
> there, you're going with the intention of finishing. That's a big difference.
> If you treat race day as a long-slow distance training session with a couple of
> photo-ops in between, this will give you a positive attitude, a big advantage
> when finishing races like these. Bottom line is to have fun out there during
> the day. That should be your intention.

> As I said, almost nobody here feels like they are ever ready for their first
> Ironman. Sometimes it just takes that leap of faith to enter and to finish. :-)

> "Iron Pete" Priolo        +--------+
>                           |26      |
> IMC'96: 10:36:37          |   Fe   |   IMCAL, IMC Y2K
> IMC'99: 10:45:03          |        |
>                           +--------+
>                  "THE BEST ELEMENT OF RACING"

I gotta second what Pete says.  I finished my first (and only) Ironman last year
after slowly building up my long bike and run sessions.  I only started running in
preparation for the November race in June, having spent six months letting my
osteitis pubis heal.  I found that doing the long slow stuff on the bike and run
very important from both a mental and physical point of view.  If you can do a six
hr bike and a 3 hr run without feeling totally blasted, you are ready.  I go into
to these long training sessions with the idea of trying to find a pace that I feel
I can sustain almost indefinitely, and not try to "empty the tank" so to speak.
Another piece of advise I found most helpful, which is a quote from a female pro
who's name now escapes me, is that it is far better to be 10% undertrained going
into an Ironman than 1% overtrained.  To wit, stick to a plan to reach your peak
mileage maybe 4 weeks before the race, and start tapering down so you are doing
almost nothing the week of the race.  You want to be completely rested.  It will be
a strange feeling, not having any sore muscles, etc., but you must resist the
temptation to try to put in some last minute training so close to the race.  Like
Pete says, go into the race with the attitude that it's just going to be a long
day's workout, you're just trying to make the cutoff times and finish, and relax
and enjoy the moment.   Just a few thoughts based on my limited experience, YMMV.
I found RST to be a great source of information and encouragement, so just ask.

Marty Carson

P.S.  Finishing your first Ironman will be one of the greatest rushes you can
imagine.  My one fear now is that I will become an "Iron Junkie" who spends the
rest of his life unsucessfully trying to re-create that initial high.

 
 
 

IM Vets: When do you know that you know

Post by gordo byr » Wed, 17 May 2000 04:00:00

    Another piece of advise I found most helpful, which is a quote from a
female pro who's name now escapes me,

    >>>That would be Paula Newby Fraser, she said it on an IMH special a few
years back.  gordo