Race wheels and training wheels

Race wheels and training wheels

Post by Chris Plesk » Sun, 19 Jul 1998 04:00:00


I am looking to put together a new bike after this season and I am in
the process of saving and selecting components.  I was wondering what
wheels you all have on your bike for both racing and training.  I am
looking for

everyday wheels:  something that will not break is the bottom line as
well as cost. Weight and aerodynamics are secondary.  I want a quality
wheel that is worth every penny and can breeze through everyday training
but will also be dependable for racing in an emergency.  What are you
all using?

race wheels:  I am open to suggestions.  Aerodynamics and weight are
important as well as durability.  If it breaks then it isn't gonna help
me go fast is it? :)  Cost is not so important as I can always buy these
later.  What is RST racing on?

BTW almost every penny i have earned at my new job has been saved so
that one day I can get a new bike.  IT's looking like a fun christmas!
:)

Chris Plesko
Tri***

P.S. boy am I glad I work in a bike shop

 
 
 

Race wheels and training wheels

Post by Joe Foste » Sun, 19 Jul 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

> everyday wheels:  something that will not break is the bottom line as
> well as cost. Weight and aerodynamics are secondary.  

Chris, I think you are on the money here. I would look for a set of
wheeels that is inexpensive and durable. I would not waste any money on
expensive tires. FWIW my current training set are a durable Mavic with
$18 ea. 650c Vittoria's and a Mr. Tuffy jamned in (who needs the
headache of flats when training). In fact, what importance is there in
aero, light, training wheels with expensive ***?

Quote:
> race wheels:  I am open to suggestions.  Aerodynamics and weight are
> important as well as durability.  

Many good wheels - seems that there was a great article on the Ausie
Triathlon Magazine site - you may want to look up. I would suggest that
you consider the terrain in which you will be racing as part of your
selection. Consider aluminum vs. Carbon Fibre breaking surfaces . . .

FWIW, I have Zipps, bought through Dave's Wheel Works, mounted with
Conti' Comp GP Tubular's. I like them, but would also like a Corima
4-Spoke rear and "V" ft. Big difference in $'s though.

Good Training, Good Racing,

Joe
__________________________________________________________

Joseph C. Foster

__________________________________________________________

"People can't understand why a man runs. They don't see any sport in it,
argue that it lacks the sight-thrill of body contact, the color of rough
conflict. Yet the conflict is there, more raw and challenging than any
man versus man competition. In (Triathlon) it is man against himself,
the
cruelest of all opponents. The other (racers) are not the real enemies.
His adversary lies deep within him, in his ability, with brain and
heart,
to control and master himself and his emotions." - Glenn Cunningham

__________________________________________________________

 
 
 

Race wheels and training wheels

Post by TRIathlt » Mon, 20 Jul 1998 04:00:00

Chris,
    I train on 28 spoke(bladed) Mavic cpx12's with Dura Ace hubs. They have
been very dependable and can be raced on...I used them for training and racing
for 2 years. I now race on HED wheels. CX front and Deep rear. I have had no
problems with them.

 
 
 

Race wheels and training wheels

Post by Olivier Spagno » Tue, 21 Jul 1998 04:00:00

Chris,

        It is a really good habit to train with "Common" wheels to keep your
competition ones in godd "health".
Here is my example: Raced on 07/12, with my competition wheels. I always
chnage them the day after to go back to training with training wheels. This
time, as I had left them at the bike shop, thinking of changing as soon as
possible after the race. This week end I had to train but no time to go to
the shop. And of course, yesterday, I almost broke the 2 wheels (waiting
for the diagnosis) in a road damage (hole??). I would have prefer to do it
with my cxp 12 rather than with the Hed cx.

        So, do not hesitate to have both kind of wheels and use only competition
ones for the race.

        Olivier



Quote:
> Chris,
>     I train on 28 spoke(bladed) Mavic cpx12's with Dura Ace hubs. They
have
> been very dependable and can be raced on...I used them for training and
racing
> for 2 years. I now race on HED wheels. CX front and Deep rear. I have had
no
> problems with them.

 
 
 

Race wheels and training wheels

Post by Achim Heinl » Tue, 21 Jul 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

> I am looking to put together a new bike after this season and I am in
> the process of saving and selecting components.  I was wondering what
> wheels you all have on your bike for both racing and training.  I am
> looking for

> everyday wheels:  something that will not break is the bottom line as
> well as cost. Weight and aerodynamics are secondary.  I want a quality
> wheel that is worth every penny and can breeze through everyday training
> but will also be dependable for racing in an emergency.  What are you
> all using?

> race wheels:  I am open to suggestions.  Aerodynamics and weight are
> important as well as durability.  If it breaks then it isn't gonna help
> me go fast is it? :)  Cost is not so important as I can always buy these
> later.  What is RST racing on?

> BTW almost every penny i have earned at my new job has been saved so
> that one day I can get a new bike.  IT's looking like a fun christmas!
> :)

> Chris Plesko
> Tri***

> P.S. boy am I glad I work in a bike shop

 I use 32 spoked wheels with wolber TX profile clincher rims for training.
For racing I have a pair of Zipp 400's purchased in 1993. They're just
great. I also purchased a Zipp 870 disc for racing.

--

Achim Wilfried Heinle

  vcard.vcf
< 1K Download
 
 
 

Race wheels and training wheels

Post by Rick Denn » Thu, 23 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
>I am looking to put together a new bike after this season and I am in
>the process of saving and selecting components.  I was wondering what
>wheels you all have on your bike for both racing and training.  I am
>looking for

>everyday wheels:  something that will not break is the bottom line as
>well as cost. Weight and aerodynamics are secondary.  I want a quality
>wheel that is worth every penny and can breeze through everyday training
>but will also be dependable for racing in an emergency.  What are you
>all using?

Here are bulletproof training wheels: Mavic MA-2 rims laced using 36
DT 15-16-16 butted spokes with brass ***s on the major-brand hub of
your choice. If you are light, 32 spokes are fine. Mavic MA-2's are
still available, and are the non-anodized version of MA-40's. The lack
of anodizing makes them more durable, because anodizing is brittle and
can cause microcracks in the surface that eventually become fatigue
cracks around the spoke holes. The newer rims with the machined
sidewalls create a rim with variable wall thickness--if it were not
so, then the machining would be irrelevant (but still expensive). Bad
either way, so the most durable rims will have non-machined sideways.

Butted spokes allow the spokes to give a little in the strong middle
part to save fatigue stress on the fatigue-prone ends.

Such wheels appropriately tensioned and stress relieved will last the
life of the rim (with reasonable pot-hole avoidance, the end of that
life is when the brakes wear through the sidewalls) with minimal
truing. Spoke breakage will only occur with defective spokes, which is
to say maybe one in the life of the rims. When the rims are dead, you
can lace new rims on the old spokes--they are still strong. I know
people who have laced many rims on the same wheels, and they are still
going strong.

You can build these wheels yourself if you have the time and
inclination. It's not hard, but it requires patience and knowledge.
The knowledge comes from Jobst Brandt's book _The Bicycle Wheel_,
published by Avocet Press, and available at real big bookstores (but
not the chains) or from Colorado Cyclist. That book will tell you how
to lace, tension, stress-relieve, and true the wheel.

Quote:

>race wheels:  I am open to suggestions.  Aerodynamics and weight are
>important as well as durability.  If it breaks then it isn't gonna help
>me go fast is it? :)  Cost is not so important as I can always buy these
>later.  What is RST racing on?

For triathlon, aerodynamic efficiency is much more important than
weight. I have two sets of Spinergy's: Aerodynamic, moderate weight,
and durable for me. But others report a variety of durability and
possibly quality-control problems. Specialized tri-spoke wheels are
also aero. Some will argue, and will back it up with their data, that
HED Deep rims with bladed spokes are the way to go, but I'm not a big
fan of bladed spokes. If cost is no object, the Nimble wheels seem to
be the lightest and most aero wheels around (if you believe their test
results), but durability is still an unknown.

Once you see the prices, you might find out that cost is more of an
object than you think. In which case, look for a used set of
Spinergy's, and use them only for racing. You might have to have new
bearings pressed into the hubs, but this is only about a $75 job from
what I understand. With with new bearings, you should be able to get a
set of race wheels for under $500.

Quote:

>BTW almost every penny i have earned at my new job has been saved so
>that one day I can get a new bike.  IT's looking like a fun christmas!
>:)

>Chris Plesko
>Tri***

>P.S. boy am I glad I work in a bike shop

Rick Denney
Take what you want and leave the rest.