Book wanted on '72 massacre

Book wanted on '72 massacre

Post by Steve Eiswir » Fri, 07 Aug 1992 00:37:29


I thought NBC did a good job on the piece about the '72 massacre at the Munich
games.  I was 8 yrs old at the time, and don't remember anything about it
other than Israeli athletes were held hostage and eventually massacred by
some Arab creeps.

I was wondering if anyone knows of a good book on the subject that I could
pick up.  Thanks in advance.

 
 
 

Book wanted on '72 massacre

Post by Rich Kulawi » Fri, 07 Aug 1992 01:49:31

Quote:

>I thought NBC did a good job on the piece about the '72 massacre at the
>Munich games.

With the exception of the use of some of the fancy graphics instead of
the original footage, I concur.  I suspect that they went with the graphics
instead of the original video in an attempt to soften the impact -- after
all, they presented this in the context of a sports program, not a news show.
But of all the pieces they've done during these games, I think this one
may have been the best.  BTW, did anyone else notice how few commercials
interrupted it?

 
 
 

Book wanted on '72 massacre

Post by Gemma McLuck » Fri, 07 Aug 1992 06:56:30

Rich>> I thought NBC did a good job on the piece about the '72 massacre at the
Rich>> Munich games.
Steve> With the exception of the use of some of the fancy graphics instead of
Steve> the original footage, I concur.

I guess the quality of the documentary showed what has always been NBC's strong
point, news coverage.  It was a moving and gripping review of the tragedy.  I
felt the same sick helplessness I felt in 1972 as I held my infant son and
watched Jim McKay.

Later, an interview with the 20-year-old daughter of one of the ***ed
Israeli athletes brought out some of the anger she feels. She asked
why the Games continued (it was mentioned in the piece that the cheers from a
volleyball game could be heard during the standoff at the Olympic Village). And
her hurt was obvious when she talked of how her mother felt when, during a
memorial service in the stadium the day after the ***s, athletes stretched
and prepared for their events on the sidelines.

Earlier in the week, a gift fell into NBC's lap.  When the injured British
runner insisted on finishing his race, the commentators only had to be
sympathetic -- or even silent -- to gain the viewers' emotions.   The
documentary on Munich was much difficult: an honest attempt to touch our
feelings and to get us to think about just what is the importance, after all is
said and done, of the Olympic Games.

Gemma McLuckie

 
 
 

Book wanted on '72 massacre

Post by Liz Johns » Sat, 08 Aug 1992 02:52:46

I too thought it was well done though at least one point was raised
and then never elaborated on -- they said that the terrorists
supposedly picked up weapons in the East German building in the
village. But that was all they said. Is there evidence that East
Germans were also involved? I thought it was a strange thing to
mention as new information and not elaborate on.

I was entering high school the summer of 72 and remember vividly
standing in Sears buying school supplies when I heard the news from
one of the clerks. I was Olympic-crazy that year (and now) and
remember those days more vividly than any other tragedy in my life.
The NBC film was heart-breaking because it brought back all of those
feelings and gave me details I'd forgotten -- like the hour-long
stand-off at the airport. I thought the helicopters landed and it was
over quickly. It seems so much more horrible to know that the athletes
sat for an hour waiting for rescue.

Liz

 
 
 

Book wanted on '72 massacre

Post by elizabeth word » Sun, 09 Aug 1992 00:13:09

I also would like to say what an excellent job I felt
NBC did with their documentary on the '72 Munich
massacre.  I felt that it added depth and perspective
to my understanding of the Olympics in general as well
as that horrible episode in the Olympics.