Olympic Horse Dies After Competition - NBC Fails to Mention This

Olympic Horse Dies After Competition - NBC Fails to Mention This

Post by okerr » Sat, 23 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Here's the link to the CNN story:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/olympics/2000/equestrian/news/2000/0...
oss_country_ap/

The horse, Bermuda's Gold, broke the cannon bone (the long bone between knee
and ankle) during the cross-country and was later destroyed at a veterinary
clinic.
On last night's NBC report, they talked about the winners and showed one of
the (many) falls, but didn't even mention this.
Cross-country is a horribly dangerous event.  The obstacles are solid,
permanent, and huge.  In the last three years, something like 12 riders have
been *killed* doing this -- I believe three were from Great Britain alone.
And it's hard to say how many horses have been lost.
This is also the event Chris Reeve was trying to do when he was injured,
btw.
Give me dressage any day.
okerry
--
Real life doesn't have to make sense.  Fiction does.

--
Real life doesn't have to make sense.  Fiction does.

 
 
 

Olympic Horse Dies After Competition - NBC Fails to Mention This

Post by Patty Wint » Sun, 24 Sep 2000 09:31:23


Quote:

>Here's the link to the CNN story:

>http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/olympics/2000/equestrian/news/2000/0...
>oss_country_ap/

>The horse, Bermuda's Gold, broke the cannon bone (the long bone between knee
>and ankle) during the cross-country and was later destroyed at a veterinary
>clinic.

Okay, I'll ask the obvious dumb question: Why did they have to euthanize
him? Sure, I understand that he couldn't compete any more, but couldn't
the leg have healed and he would have been a perfectly good mount for
some horse-crazy 12-year-old girl who'd only ride him on weekends?

Also, the referenced article said:

        The endurance phase here is 14.9 miles, with the cross-country
        phase and its 29 obstacles in the final 4.6 miles ridden
        at a hard gallop.

Does that mean that the 13 minutes of timed competition we saw in
the cross-country event was only the last 4.6 miles of an event
that actually lasted 14.9 miles? I saw the start of David O'Conner's
ride on TV, and he was just milling around before the start of the
obstacle course. It didn't look as though he'd just arrived from
a 10-mile gallop.

Oh, one last question: why were the fronts of the horse's legs
covered with something white during the x-c event? (I was going
to say "painted with something white," but didn't want to imply
that it was actually paint! It was something that came off
during the course of the run, though, probably when they went
through the water jumps.)

Thanks!
Patty

 
 
 

Olympic Horse Dies After Competition - NBC Fails to Mention This

Post by Nytr » Sun, 24 Sep 2000 23:19:31

In the x-c what is the higher fatality rate? human or horse?, In the past
year 12 people have been killed in the event.

Grant


Quote:


> >Here's the link to the CNN story:

>http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/olympics/2000/equestrian/news/2000/0...
r
> >oss_country_ap/

> >The horse, Bermuda's Gold, broke the cannon bone (the long bone between
knee
> >and ankle) during the cross-country and was later destroyed at a
veterinary
> >clinic.

> Okay, I'll ask the obvious dumb question: Why did they have to euthanize
> him? Sure, I understand that he couldn't compete any more, but couldn't
> the leg have healed and he would have been a perfectly good mount for
> some horse-crazy 12-year-old girl who'd only ride him on weekends?

> Also, the referenced article said:

> The endurance phase here is 14.9 miles, with the cross-country
> phase and its 29 obstacles in the final 4.6 miles ridden
> at a hard gallop.

> Does that mean that the 13 minutes of timed competition we saw in
> the cross-country event was only the last 4.6 miles of an event
> that actually lasted 14.9 miles? I saw the start of David O'Conner's
> ride on TV, and he was just milling around before the start of the
> obstacle course. It didn't look as though he'd just arrived from
> a 10-mile gallop.

> Oh, one last question: why were the fronts of the horse's legs
> covered with something white during the x-c event? (I was going
> to say "painted with something white," but didn't want to imply
> that it was actually paint! It was something that came off
> during the course of the run, though, probably when they went
> through the water jumps.)

> Thanks!
> Patty


 
 
 

Olympic Horse Dies After Competition - NBC Fails to Mention This

Post by Annet » Sun, 24 Sep 2000 11:40:10


Quote:

> > The horse, Bermuda's Gold, broke the cannon bone

How sad.  :-(  We were shown the first fall but not the second, and when
it wasn't shown later or barely mentioned I started to worry but assumed
that our commentators would have told us of any tragedy.

Quote:
> Why did they have to euthanize him?

I think that Bermuda's Gold was one of the few mares in the field.  Also
commiserations to Mary Jane Tumbridge and all associated with Bermuda's Gold.

When I was little I was always told that horses can't recover from broken
legs and always have to be destroyed.  It wasn't until much later that
I heard of long, arduous and very expensive treatments to heal broken
equine legs.  I don't know where the truth lies but being an idealist I
always hoped that what was done was what was ultimately best for the horse.

Quote:
>         The endurance phase here is 14.9 miles, with the cross-country
>         phase and its 29 obstacles in the final 4.6 miles ridden
>         at a hard gallop.

> Does that mean that the 13 minutes of timed competition we saw in
> the cross-country event was only the last 4.6 miles of an event
> that actually lasted 14.9 miles?

The last 4.6 miles part was the only part that counted towards the score,
but before that (and I'm going from memory here and the figures I have
are in kilometres so I'm not even going to try to convert) the balance
of the distance was a cross-country non-jump phase at a trot or walk
finished off with a small gallop steeplechase (maybe nine fences?).  The
horse then called in for a vet check about ten to twenty minutes before
starting the 29-fence course that was actually scored for the event.

Quote:
> why were the fronts of the horse's legs covered with something white

It's grease to ease going over the jumps.  A lot of horses "tickle"
the fences as they go over them and the grease helps them slide over
rather than scrape and minimises the chances of injury.

Annette.

 
 
 

Olympic Horse Dies After Competition - NBC Fails to Mention This

Post by superduc » Sun, 24 Sep 2000 11:51:46

what i want to know is... why are horses in the olympics?
and why doesn't the horse get the medal? it does all the work.


Quote:
> Here's the link to the CNN story:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/olympics/2000/equestrian/news/2000/0...
Quote:
> oss_country_ap/

> The horse, Bermuda's Gold, broke the cannon bone (the long bone between
knee
> and ankle) during the cross-country and was later destroyed at a
veterinary
> clinic.
> On last night's NBC report, they talked about the winners and showed one
of
> the (many) falls, but didn't even mention this.
> Cross-country is a horribly dangerous event.  The obstacles are solid,
> permanent, and huge.  In the last three years, something like 12 riders
have
> been *killed* doing this -- I believe three were from Great Britain alone.
> And it's hard to say how many horses have been lost.
> This is also the event Chris Reeve was trying to do when he was injured,
> btw.
> Give me dressage any day.
> okerry
> --
> Real life doesn't have to make sense.  Fiction does.

> --
> Real life doesn't have to make sense.  Fiction does.

 
 
 

Olympic Horse Dies After Competition - NBC Fails to Mention This

Post by okerr » Sun, 24 Sep 2000 13:23:19

Quote:
> >Here's the link to the CNN story:
>http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/olympics/2000/equestrian/news/2000/0...
r
> >oss_country_ap/

> >The horse, Bermuda's Gold, broke the cannon bone (the long bone between >
> knee and ankle) during the cross-country and was later destroyed at a

 > > veterinary clinic.

Quote:

> Okay, I'll ask the obvious dumb question: Why did they have to euthanize
> him? Sure, I understand that he couldn't compete any more, but couldn't
> the leg have healed and he would have been a perfectly good mount for
> some horse-crazy 12-year-old girl who'd only ride him on weekends?

Some equine fractures can be treated, but the cannon bone carries a great
deal of the weight, and it's even worse if it's a front leg -- horses are
all very front-heavy.  The CNN piece made it sound like it was a very severe
break. Unlike a person, you can't put a horse on bed-rest in traction for
weeks or months until it can heal.  Even putting them in a sling is very
difficult for a few days, let alone a few weeks or months, and causes so
many other problems (like breathing, for starters) in such a large animal
that it's just not worth it to try to put the horse through all that.

Quote:
> Also, the referenced article said:
> The endurance phase here is 14.9 miles, with the cross-country
> phase and its 29 obstacles in the final 4.6 miles ridden
> at a hard gallop.
> Does that mean that the 13 minutes of timed competition we saw in
> the cross-country event was only the last 4.6 miles of an event
> that actually lasted 14.9 miles?

Yep.  The first part is for endurance and is called "roads and tracks."

I saw the start of David O'Conner's

Quote:
> ride on TV, and he was just milling around before the start of the
> obstacle course. It didn't look as though he'd just arrived from
> a 10-mile gallop.

These horses are incredibly fit, and they do get a short break before the
cross-country jumping phase begins.

Quote:
> Oh, one last question: why were the fronts of the horse's legs
> covered with something white during the x-c event? (I was going
> to say "painted with something white," but didn't want to imply
> that it was actually paint! It was something that came off
> during the course of the run, though, probably when they went
> through the water jumps.)

Crisco -- to help them slither over those godawful obstacles.
If they don't just break their legs.

okerry
--
Real life doesn't have to make sense.  Fiction does.

 
 
 

Olympic Horse Dies After Competition - NBC Fails to Mention This

Post by David McAnal » Sun, 24 Sep 2000 13:29:45

Quote:

>Here's the link to the CNN story:
>http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/olympics/2000/equestrian/news/2000/0...
>oss_country_ap/
>The horse, Bermuda's Gold, broke the cannon bone (the long bone between knee
>and ankle) during the cross-country and was later destroyed at a veterinary
>clinic.

This is very sad.  The Three Day Event is a very grueling one, and the
horses have been magnificent in carrying their riders over the dangerous
cross-country course.

Although I am aware that it would have been very difficult for Bermuda's
Gold's leg to heal from the break, it does not make her death any more
easy to come to terms with.

 
 
 

Olympic Horse Dies After Competition - NBC Fails to Mention This

Post by Les Bonse » Sun, 24 Sep 2000 14:07:20

Quote:
> > Okay, I'll ask the obvious dumb question: Why did they have to euthanize
> > him? Sure, I understand that he couldn't compete any more, but couldn't
> > the leg have healed and he would have been a perfectly good mount for
> > some horse-crazy 12-year-old girl who'd only ride him on weekends?

> Some equine fractures can be treated, but the cannon bone carries a great
> deal of the weight, and it's even worse if it's a front leg -- horses are
> all very front-heavy.  The CNN piece made it sound like it was a very
severe
> break. Unlike a person, you can't put a horse on bed-rest in traction for
> weeks or months until it can heal.  Even putting them in a sling is very
> difficult for a few days, let alone a few weeks or months, and causes so
> many other problems (like breathing, for starters) in such a large animal
> that it's just not worth it to try to put the horse through all that.

Horses sleep standing up. If they can't put weight on all four legs, they'll
go down. When a horse goes down, they very rarely get back up.

Les

 
 
 

Olympic Horse Dies After Competition - NBC Fails to Mention This

Post by Babs » Tue, 26 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
> > > Okay, I'll ask the obvious dumb question: Why did they have to
euthanize
> > > him? Sure, I understand that he couldn't compete any more, but
couldn't
> > > the leg have healed and he would have been a perfectly good mount for
> > > some horse-crazy 12-year-old girl who'd only ride him on weekends?

> > Some equine fractures can be treated, but the cannon bone carries a
great
> > deal of the weight, and it's even worse if it's a front leg -- horses
are
> > all very front-heavy.  The CNN piece made it sound like it was a very
> severe
> > break. Unlike a person, you can't put a horse on bed-rest in traction
for
> > weeks or months until it can heal.  Even putting them in a sling is very
> > difficult for a few days, let alone a few weeks or months, and causes so
> > many other problems (like breathing, for starters) in such a large
animal
> > that it's just not worth it to try to put the horse through all that.

> Horses sleep standing up. If they can't put weight on all four legs,
they'll
> go down. When a horse goes down, they very rarely get back up.

> Les

Yeah right.... try watching a horse "dozing off" in the afternoon sun....
one of the hind-legs tilted and resting, and therefore all the horses weight
rests on 3 legs.... And horses DO sleep lying down sometimes, and I never
had to help my horse getting up in the morning..... Agreed, they only do it
when they feel safe, but they can do it.

As far as the healing of a broken leg is concerned, that is indeed very
difficult, especially when the cannon-bone is broken. It takes about 6 to 8
weeks to heal perfectly, in which time the horse can not and may not stand
on the broken leg for about 2 weeks. All kinds of devices to keep the horse
standing are available, but none of those can be used long enough without
the horse suffering from other severe problems, such as troubled breating or
even fractured ribs sometimes.
--
Got the swing, got the sway, got my straw in lemonade