When Is a 25 Yard Pool Too Small?

When Is a 25 Yard Pool Too Small?

Post by Ji » Thu, 14 Nov 1996 04:00:00


Our USS and high school teams train in a 25 yard pool.  Our coach argues that
their development is being severely limited because the swimmers do not have
access to 50 meter water.  Some of the swimmers are quite talented and have
AAAA times.  I am curious as to others thoughts on this.  Thanks.

Jim

 
 
 

When Is a 25 Yard Pool Too Small?

Post by Leo Letend » Thu, 14 Nov 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> Our USS and high school teams train in a 25 yard pool.  Our coach argues that
> their development is being severely limited because the swimmers do not have
> access to 50 meter water.  Some of the swimmers are quite talented and have
> AAAA times.  I am curious as to others thoughts on this.  Thanks.

Training exclusively in a 25 yard pool is a handicap for (nearly) anyone
who will be competing in a 50 meter pool.  So if you have swimmers who
aspire to swim in major meets (Juniors, Seniors, Trials, to name the
obivous ones) that are conducted in a long course pool, your coach is
correct.  For those who do not aspire to these meets, they are still being
hindered in their quest to achieve their full potential since swimming
long course does get one in better shape and typically causes one to
develop a more efficient stroke due to the decrease in the number of
turns.

--
Leo Letendre                      As usual, I do not speak for my employer

Monsanto Company

 
 
 

When Is a 25 Yard Pool Too Small?

Post by mel.. » Thu, 14 Nov 1996 04:00:00

I think high school and older should spend some of their time in a 50
meter pool. It is much better for swimming.  On the other hand if you
want to be a "turner" short course is the way to go.

 
 
 

When Is a 25 Yard Pool Too Small?

Post by blazes.. » Mon, 18 Nov 1996 04:00:00

I coach an age group team that swims exclusively in a 25-meter pool all
season.  We also have some AAAA swimmers and are very competitive in the
short course season.  But when it comes to the long course season, we are
woefully out of our element.  It does make a big difference, not only
physically but mentally as well.

Because of a lack of 50-meter pools in our area, there are almost no meets
and literally no practice times available.  When we travel for a meet, it
is very apparent that our athletes are at a distinct disadvantage.

 
 
 

When Is a 25 Yard Pool Too Small?

Post by dinoswim...bo simpso » Fri, 22 Nov 1996 04:00:00

CHECK OUT MY HOMEPAGE AT:
www.nucleus.com/~vanstade/simpson.htm

Well assuming the level of your athletes, you might try going on "away"
trainging camps at Christmas and Spring breaks, try to get a situation
where ALL workouts are LC.  

Also base work training before school starts is also helpful.
Re-organize your swimmers breaks to account for this and it might help?

just some ideas from someone who trains LC year round


Quote:
> I coach an age group team that swims exclusively in a 25-meter pool all
> season.  We also have some AAAA swimmers and are very competitive in the
> short course season.  But when it comes to the long course season, we are
> woefully out of our element.  It does make a big difference, not only
> physically but mentally as well.

> Because of a lack of 50-meter pools in our area, there are almost no meets
> and literally no practice times available.  When we travel for a meet, it
> is very apparent that our athletes are at a distinct disadvantage.

 
 
 

When Is a 25 Yard Pool Too Small?

Post by chri » Fri, 22 Nov 1996 04:00:00


(perhaps even premeditated), and then, in a very wise voice, sed:

Quote:
>Our USS and high school teams train in a 25 yard pool.  Our coach argues that
>their development is being severely limited because the swimmers do not have
>access to 50 meter water.  Some of the swimmers are quite talented and have
>AAAA times.  I am curious as to others thoughts on this.  Thanks.

I coach a USS team that trains exclusively in a 25 meter pool all year
round.  To say that their development is severely limited is, in my
opinion, quite over-stated and melodramatic.  Is it limiting to train
short course? Yes.  Is it impossible to be become an excellent long
course swimmer training in a short course pool?  Definitely not.

Great coaches and great swimmers excel no matter what their situation
is.  If I remember a talk I heard by Mike Parratto (Jenny Thompson's
coach) correctly, they did not have any pool at all for the first 2
months of the season.  Everything they did was dryland.  When they did
get pool time, it was often shared with the women doing aqua-robics.

I just recently heard Scott Volkers (Suzy O'neil and Samantha Reilly's
coach) tell us of his training situation.  His team is allowed one
lane of the pool during warm up, and three lanes for their main sets.

Find a way to make what you have work for you.

(Of course, it never hurts to look into alternatives as well.  Are
ther *any* long course pools available?  Maybe a nearby team would be
willing to share some space once in a while.  When I was a competitive
swimmer, our team used a 20 yard pool in the summers.  Our coach
managed to find a lake with two docks that were, I assume, 50 meters
apart.  Quite grudgingly, we swam in that lake to get the long course
training.  Where there's a will there's a way.)

There are many things you can do to develop the extra endurance
necessary for long course swimming.  Swim 225's instead of 200's.  Try
"no-wall" flip turns.  Etc, etc.  A year or so ago, Swimming Technique
published an article about this very topic.  Maybe your coach can get
a reprint.  Or, if not, and he is interested, I can send him a copy.

later. . . .

                chris

                "YES!  is the answer."  --John Lennon