Thorpe Morphs

Thorpe Morphs

Post by Tom Liese » Thu, 14 Sep 2000 01:11:53


Check out yesterday's (Monday Sept. 11) New York Times article on Ian
Thorpe:  "Big Feet, Bigger Splash for Australian," by Jere Longman.
This is part of a special Times section on Sydney 2000.  Find it at:

http://SportToday.org/

A few nuggets from the article, in case you didn't already know:

"His feet are so flexible that he can touch his shin with his toes,
(Coach Don) Talbot said."  --bet YOU can't do this!

"His stroke is nearly 9 feet long, so attenuated that Thorpe needs only
16 strokes per 50-meter lap..."  --how far can YOU go in 16 strokes?

"He is also a millionaire who enjoys dabbling in day trading of
stocks."  Presumably, the wealth results from endor***ts which
include  "...a phone company, an airline, a bank, a cereal, and an
automobile."  --what was YOUR net worth at age 17?

Can't wait to see this guy swim!

 
 
 

Thorpe Morphs

Post by Derek McEache » Thu, 14 Sep 2000 03:58:26

Quote:

>Check out yesterday's (Monday Sept. 11) New York Times article on
>Ian Thorpe:  "Big Feet, Bigger Splash for Australian," by Jere
>Longman. This is part of a special Times section on Sydney 2000.
>Find it at:

>http://www.nytimes.com/2000/09/11/olympics/11XTHOR.html

>A few nuggets from the article, in case you didn't already know:

>"His feet are so flexible that he can touch his shin with his toes,
>(Coach Don) Talbot said."  --bet YOU can't do this!

Ouch, this doesn't seem natural.  One of the keys to a good kick is
flexible ankles, I guess this would explain his fantastic kick.

--
Derek
derekm at airmail dot net

 
 
 

Thorpe Morphs

Post by RunnSw » Thu, 14 Sep 2000 04:30:10

Quote:
>>Ouch, this doesn't seem natural.  One of the keys to a good kick is

flexible ankles, I guess this would explain his fantastic kick.<<

Size 17 feet; hyperflexible ankles...and the purpose of the kick in swimming is
only to maintain balance and Thorpe's kick has nothing to do with his ability
to swim 50 meters in 16 strokes and to race 50 meters in 29 strokes, and....

But then someone is bound to claim that this only applies to Thorpe and having
merely, say, size 12 feet and merely having flexible ankles and not
hyperflexible ankles doesn't confer an advantage, because the kick in everyone
(save for Thorpe) is only for balance, and...

 
 
 

Thorpe Morphs

Post by Michael Ede » Thu, 14 Sep 2000 09:11:40

Hahahahaha! well said Larry :)

Gl
MIke


Quote:
> >>Ouch, this doesn't seem natural.  One of the keys to a good kick is
> flexible ankles, I guess this would explain his fantastic kick.<<

> Size 17 feet; hyperflexible ankles...and the purpose of the kick in
swimming is
> only to maintain balance and Thorpe's kick has nothing to do with his
ability
> to swim 50 meters in 16 strokes and to race 50 meters in 29 strokes,
and....

> But then someone is bound to claim that this only applies to Thorpe and
having
> merely, say, size 12 feet and merely having flexible ankles and not
> hyperflexible ankles doesn't confer an advantage, because the kick in
everyone
> (save for Thorpe) is only for balance, and...

 
 
 

Thorpe Morphs

Post by Isiaf » Thu, 14 Sep 2000 12:10:54

Quote:

>"His feet are so flexible that he can touch his shin with his toes,
>(Coach Don) Talbot said."  --bet YOU can't do this!

Gotta see it to believe it.

Sling Skate

 
 
 

Thorpe Morphs

Post by MKazoocr » Thu, 14 Sep 2000 13:48:51

Is dorsiflexing the ankle to the shin a useful position in swimming?  Since I
am pretty sure the answer is "no",  what is the advantage to this beyond
ordinarily flexible ankles?
 
 
 

Thorpe Morphs

Post by RunnSw » Fri, 15 Sep 2000 01:25:12

Quote:
>>Is dorsiflexing the ankle to the shin a useful position in swimming?  Since I

am pretty sure the answer is "no",  what is the advantage to this beyond
ordinarily flexible ankles?<<

Rhetorical Q, .. I'm sure.  I'll bet that there's a strong correlation between
dorsiflexion and plantar flexion (which is clearly an advantage).  Now, if he
can touch the soles of his feet to his calves...that would really be something.