Pool safety: Ring buoy vs. hook

Pool safety: Ring buoy vs. hook

Post by j_paq » Sun, 04 Jul 1999 04:00:00



Quote:

>x-no-archive: yes

>For my backyard pool, we thought we should have some type of safety device.
>Any recommendations of pros and cons of ring buoys vs. hooks (on a
>non-telescoping pole)?

>Thanks. - Charlie

Generally (very generally) a ring bouy is what you would throw
to someone having trouble to tow them in.  A hook I usually
think of as something to pull someone off the bottom
of the pool, but it can also be used by reaching it out
to someone in trouble. It's not as easy to give to someone
without conking them on the head inadvertantly.  Best thing
to do is call the county health department and see what they
require for pools in your area.  I think I'd want a ring
buoy and a pole with a mesh basket on the end for getting
leaves and stuff out of the pool (and can double as a reaching
device for a rescue).

j.

 
 
 

Pool safety: Ring buoy vs. hook

Post by gazo » Sun, 04 Jul 1999 04:00:00

As a lifeguard that has tried both I can tell you that you need both.  The
safest way to save someone is in the following order...
    Talk
    Throw
    Reach
    Wade
    Row
    Swim
    Tow
    Carry
Try having some other floatation devices that when thrown if they hit you in
the head they won't knock you out.  (flutter boards, noodles, etc.)
If you find that the pole isn't of any help (person is unconscious) then you
will need something to take into the water with you for your own safety just
in case.
There is a story of a 21 year old lifeguard in top condition that went to
save a seven year old child.  He did the rescue improperly and the little
girl ended up drowning him.

PLEASE take some sort of lifesaving course.  The life you save may be your
own.
happy safe swimming
ken

Quote:
> For my backyard pool, we thought we should have some type of safety
device.
> Any recommendations of pros and cons of ring buoys vs. hooks (on a
> non-telescoping pole)?

> Thanks. - Charlie


 
 
 

Pool safety: Ring buoy vs. hook

Post by Gleshna » Sun, 04 Jul 1999 04:00:00

Quote:
>in case.
>There is a story of a 21 year old lifeguard in top condition that went to
>save a seven year old child.  He did the rescue improperly and the little
>girl ended up drowning him.

Urban myth for lifesaving classes?

Bob

 
 
 

Pool safety: Ring buoy vs. hook

Post by Gleshna » Sun, 04 Jul 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

>For my backyard pool, we thought we should have some type of safety device.
>Any recommendations of pros and cons of ring buoys vs. hooks (on a
>non-telescoping pole)?

Hook.

Bob

 
 
 

Pool safety: Ring buoy vs. hook

Post by Todd Joyc » Mon, 05 Jul 1999 04:00:00

You can never have enough safety devices by the pool.  If you have a
sheppards crook (life hook) make sure it is attached to the pole with bolts
and not the plastic derlin clip that comes on nets & brushes.  A first aid
kit, backboard and telephone should all be POOLSIDE as well.  Do not rely on
pool alarms as they give a false sense of security.  Remember - the best
safety device is human supervision!

--
Todd Joyce
President
Expert Pool & Spa, Inc.
8511 Lakeview Drive
Omaha, NE 68127-2668
402-596-1171 Voice
402-592-7916 Fax


Quote:
> x-no-archive: yes

> For my backyard pool, we thought we should have some type of safety
device.
> Any recommendations of pros and cons of ring buoys vs. hooks (on a
> non-telescoping pole)?

> Thanks. - Charlie

 
 
 

Pool safety: Ring buoy vs. hook

Post by gazo » Mon, 05 Jul 1999 04:00:00

Urban myth or not, this is really the way adrenaline works in a situation!
This story was related to inforce the seriousness of trying to save someone
untrained.  It obviously can be done but can also be very dangerous.
Quote:
> >There is a story of a 21 year old lifeguard in top condition that went to
> >save a seven year old child.  He did the rescue improperly and the little
> >girl ended up drowning him.

> Urban myth for lifesaving classes?

> Bob

 
 
 

Pool safety: Ring buoy vs. hook

Post by Charli » Mon, 05 Jul 1999 04:00:00

Not to be confused more than we are...numerous web sites say the order
should be Reach before Throw (rather than Throw before Reach, as you
suggested) Are you standing by your order?

For example, see:
http://canoe.miningco.com/library/weekly/aa110397.htm
and
http://www.sardislake.com/State_Park/Safety/safety.html

-Charlie


Quote:
> As a lifeguard that has tried both I can tell you that you need both.  The
> safest way to save someone is in the following order...
>     Talk
>     Throw
>     Reach
>     Wade
>     Row
>     Swim
>     Tow
>     Carry

<CLIP>
 
 
 

Pool safety: Ring buoy vs. hook

Post by j_paq » Tue, 06 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>Not to be confused more than we are...numerous web sites say the order
>should be Reach before Throw (rather than Throw before Reach, as you
>suggested) Are you standing by your order?

The Red Cross has always taught Reach-Throw-Row-Go to help
new lifeguards remember the proper sequence.

j.

 
 
 

Pool safety: Ring buoy vs. hook

Post by Yehosh » Tue, 06 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:



>>x-no-archive: yes

>>For my backyard pool, we thought we should have some type of safety device.
>>Any recommendations of pros and cons of ring buoys vs. hooks (on a
>>non-telescoping pole)?

>Generally (very generally) a ring bouy is what you would throw
>to someone having trouble to tow them in.  A hook I usually
>think of as something to pull someone off the bottom
>of the pool, but it can also be used by reaching it out
>to someone in trouble. It's not as easy to give to someone
>without conking them on the head inadvertantly.  

In my experience, I've always found the hooks (or when working
pools where the owners thought a ring bouy was sufficient, the
ubiquitous gunk net) easier to use.

If nothing else, when stocking a pool years ago that would only be
tended part-time (but the mgmt. wanted it open when no guards were
on duty), I found that having the hooks INSTEAD of the rings did
two things:

1) people in the unfortunate position of trying to save someone
   w/out training weren't goint to kill anyone by trying to win
   the ring toss.

2) kids didn't think of the hooks as toys, so the lifesaving gear
   wasn't chewed up when real emergencies occured.

I'd hate to be in the position of picking one over the other again,
but I'd definitely recommend the hook for a backyard pool if I had
to choose.

Quote:
>Best thing
>to do is call the county health department and see what they
>require for pools in your area.

I concur inasmuch as I think this should certainly be the minimum
you have around your pool. Of course, I'd also recommend taking a
basic lifesaving course to boot, so that you'll know exactly what all
the gear is for. Both hooks and bouys can be dangerous if used
improperly.

yehoshua

--
        Dear Lord, give me the strength to seek the truth, but spare
        me the company of those who have found it.

 
 
 

Pool safety: Ring buoy vs. hook

Post by j_paq » Tue, 06 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>I concur inasmuch as I think this should certainly be the minimum
>you have around your pool. Of course, I'd also recommend taking a
>basic lifesaving course to boot, so that you'll know exactly what all
>the gear is for. Both hooks and bouys can be dangerous if used
>improperly.

>yehoshua

The Red Cross offers the Community Water Safety course
to fulfill this need.  It's about 4 hrs with an option
1 hour water session (that's going off the top of my
head since all my materials are a good 2000 mi away
right now).

Julie

 
 
 

Pool safety: Ring buoy vs. hook

Post by gazo » Wed, 07 Jul 1999 04:00:00

Just to totally confuse every one, yes my order is correct as per The Life
Saving Society Canada.  Yes I do agree that is the way it used to be taught.
If a rescue can be performed without any contact (direct or indirect) this
is the safest way to do so.  If a person reaches out to a victim there is
some indirect contact and the risk of being pulled in.  If the recuer lands
close enough to the victim, the victim my grab on causing a double drowning.

Anyone with further questions or wishing to discuss this further please feel
free to e-mail me at...

ken

Quote:

> The Red Cross has always taught Reach-Throw-Row-Go to help
> new lifeguards remember the proper sequence.

> j.