Advice about working out to improve swimming

Advice about working out to improve swimming

Post by Gregory LaMont Case » Wed, 09 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Hello all,

I know that this may have been talked about b4, but I am very curious
about weight training and swimming.  What are some of the workouts that
you girls and guys to in the gym?  Do you prefer push ups, squats, calf
presses and pull ups using your bodies weight only?  I have decided to
take this Red Cross approved lifeguard training course at a local
community, in addition to regular university classes.  The instructor
recommends that we workout in a gym of some kind.  When I questioned her
regarding the types of work outs, she stated that it was up to me.  Any
advice out there?

Now I use to be a gym goer b4 I started swimming.  Now I swim as the
only workout.  Swimming has been my regular routine for a while now.
When I did work out in a gym I used free weights.  I am 5'9, 178 pounds,
muscular and my body is tight.  I had one of those body fat tests where
they pinch key points of the body and I was told that I was at 10
percent.  I do not want to get any bigger than I am at the moment.
Anyway I hope that brief history will help you when recommending
programs for me.

Gregory

 
 
 

Advice about working out to improve swimming

Post by Glesh » Thu, 10 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Quote:
>I am 5'9, 178 pounds,
>muscular and my body is tight.

If you are already strong then to my knowledge for endurance stuff  2.5 the
power for a given movement is sufficient.

If you cardio is not at its best then running and biking could improve that,
and I think it transfers to swimming since you body doesn't really know what is
causing the *** to get pumped faster.

You might consider the book recommended by the Total Immersion author,  Power
Yoga.  Gaining flexibility may be more significant than strength.

Luck,

Bob

 
 
 

Advice about working out to improve swimming

Post by Don » Thu, 10 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>>I am 5'9, 178 pounds,
>>muscular and my body is tight.

>If you are already strong then to my knowledge for endurance stuff  2.5 the
>power for a given movement is sufficient.

>If you cardio is not at its best then running and biking could improve that,
>and I think it transfers to swimming since you body doesn't really know what is
>causing the *** to get pumped faster.

>You might consider the book recommended by the Total Immersion author,  Power
>Yoga.  Gaining flexibility may be more significant than strength.

>Luck,

>Bob

Geriatric studies have shown that working out with weights is one of
the best things a person can do for him/her-self.  Gaining strength is
not the only goal.  With proper weight training you can improove
flexibility wonderfully.  

There is a specificity of training effect.  What you gain from weight
lifting, or running, will not transfer directly to swimming without
swim workouts.  

At one time in my life I was a 'class' marathon runner and had not
swam for years.  When I went back to swimming (in order to do
triathlons) I was gasping for breath after only 25 yards!  It took
considerable workouts to gain sufficient endurance in swimming.

I believe it is a poor idea for a beginner to try to learn weight
training from books, especially with free weights.  Done properly they
can balance your body, improve strength and flexibility, improve you
posture, and generally make you feel good.  If not done properly, they
can lead to much the opposite.  A person can hurt him/her-self.
Learning weight lifting purely from a book is a last resort.  Books
can help, however, after receiving sufficient instruction to know how
to achieve balance, etc.

As to how much of which excersises to do, that will vary from person
to person.

Don D

 
 
 

Advice about working out to improve swimming

Post by PDPsw » Fri, 11 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Quote:
>Subject: Re: Advice about working out to improve swimming

>Date: 9/9/1998 7:55 AM Central Daylight Time

>>I am 5'9, 178 pounds,
>>muscular and my body is tight.

Hello! Gregory

Try the URL below. It is nested within the swiminfo.com site--well worth
looking at periodically.

http://www.swiminfo.com/technique/technique.pl?goto=dryland

Also, flexibility is important, esp. when one's body is already strong. I just
found an article by Marty Hull on the flutter kick--it discusses on ways of
improving the specific flexibility (the ankles) for it and also on strength.
Some exercises can be done in the water.

http://www.swiminfo.com/technique/technique.pl?goto=swim0795-3


[Paul Panaretos]

 
 
 

Advice about working out to improve swimming

Post by Carson Turner & Betty Hol » Fri, 11 Sep 1998 04:00:00

While I agree that weight training can be an important part of the training
routine for competitors and evewn fitness swimmers;  I have been a Red Cross
instructor for a long time and fail to see where weight training is going to
be necessary for the typical lifeguard training student.  The single hardest
part of the class (IMHO) is the 500 yard swim and the only way I know to
make it easier on you is to practice swimming and practice swimming right.
A good series of kick drills every day will help with the towing exercises
in the class.  I can recommend nothing better to prepare for Lifeguard
Training class (the American Red Cross variety) than to improve your stroke
efficiency (through qualified coaching) and to improve you endurance level
(through lap swimming).  Now, once in the class - pay attention and read
those books.

It's really not that hard a program any more (not to get the xyz
lifeguarding is better than efg lifeguarding thread started again).

Just my opinion for what it is worth.


Quote:
>>Subject: Re: Advice about working out to improve swimming

>>Date: 9/9/1998 7:55 AM Central Daylight Time

>>>I am 5'9, 178 pounds,
>>>muscular and my body is tight.

>Hello! Gregory

>Try the URL below. It is nested within the swiminfo.com site--well worth
>looking at periodically.

>http://www.swiminfo.com/technique/technique.pl?goto=dryland

>Also, flexibility is important, esp. when one's body is already strong. I
just
>found an article by Marty Hull on the flutter kick--it discusses on ways of
>improving the specific flexibility (the ankles) for it and also on
strength.
>Some exercises can be done in the water.

>http://www.swiminfo.com/technique/technique.pl?goto=swim0795-3

>Stay afloat!

>[Paul Panaretos]

 
 
 

Advice about working out to improve swimming

Post by Glesh » Sat, 12 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Quote:
>I have been a Red Cross
>instructor for a long time and fail to see where weight training is going to
>be necessary for the typical lifeguard training student.

It has been a rather long time since I have done my lifegaurd and WSI stuff,
but I do recall needing to subdue swimmers in a panic.  We used to have to work
against defacto actors for these drills, and I appreciated my strength.  I
would think that improving overall strength might be helpful for this part of a
rescue unless something has changed a great deal over the past decades.

Bob

 
 
 

Advice about working out to improve swimming

Post by Carson Turner & Betty Hol » Sat, 12 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Over the last decade very much has changed in the American Red Cross
Lifeguard Training class. Over the last two decades it's not even
recognizable as the same course.  I too remember having to place a victim
(played by an over zealous actor) into a cross chest carry and tow back.  I
also recall releases, blocks, and escapes that required more than a little
upper body strength.  Now, with the requirement that all rescues be
equipment based (rescue tube), the need for that upper body strength in the
class is negated (at least some) by the buoyancy of the tube.  Escapes and
releases have been dropped from the course - remember that rear headhold
escape that failed so many people and nearly drowned us all? (ah... the good
ole days...) A very strong kick is still very useful in towing and
backboarding drills where all power must come from the kick as the hands are
in use.  While lower body weight work might help there - most lifeguard
students would have greater benefit from kick drills and technique
improvement.  I have seen far more students fail this class in the last 4
years due to academic failure than due to physical failure (assuming they
made it through the pre-course session 500 yard swim).  I still see many
coming to take the class that can't swim a continuos 500 yards or only know
one stroke - front crawl with head high and dry.

I have been teaching lifeguards since '78.  Advanced Lifesaving in the
70's/80's and Lifeguarding (in it's several forms) since '84.  I beleive
that the class has never been physically easier than it is now but, it is
more mentally challenging now than it ever was.  Consider that the class is
now just over 30 hours in length and includes in that 30 hours Lifeguard
Training, First Aid, and CPR - Professional Rescuer.  Contrast that to when
Advanced Lifesaving was 25+ hours and Standard First Aid (without CPR) was
another 21, and CPR was another 8-16 (c 1979)  What we are providing today
is not even close to the same class it was 15 - 20 years ago.  Of course 15
years ago we didn't teach lifeguard candidates basic oxygen administration
and use of automatic external defibrilators either - so, some changes have
brought us forward quite a bit.

Now, I'm not saying the present course is not as good as the old courses.  I
have seen some outstanding guards come out of the present class and, the
emphasis on preventive lifeguarding is (IMO) making a difference in our
pool.  I for one though would like to see a return to the days of 50+ hours
of pre-employment training though.


Quote:
>>I have been a Red Cross
>>instructor for a long time and fail to see where weight training is going
to
>>be necessary for the typical lifeguard training student.

>It has been a rather long time since I have done my lifegaurd and WSI
stuff,
>but I do recall needing to subdue swimmers in a panic.  We used to have to
work
>against defacto actors for these drills, and I appreciated my strength.  I
>would think that improving overall strength might be helpful for this part
of a
>rescue unless something has changed a great deal over the past decades.

>Bob

 
 
 

Advice about working out to improve swimming

Post by Don » Sun, 13 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Proper weight training will do a lot for flexibility and coordination.
Properly done it is excellent for physical fitness.

 Life guarding is not only for swimming pools, either.

 
 
 

Advice about working out to improve swimming

Post by Carson Turner & Betty Hol » Sun, 13 Sep 1998 04:00:00

I don't disagree with those points at all.  Weight training has many
wonderful benefits that it can bring to swimming (and personal fitness) but,
the original post was re: preparing for an American Red Cross Lifeguard
Training Course and what weight training activities should be done in
preparation.  My only point is that, while weight training may be a good
thing - the time may be better spent working on swimming skills and
endurance.  I'm also assuming that the poster is not preparing to take the
course in a year but, very soon.  Given that assumption, the single best
preparation might be to get qualified stroke instruction (everyone can
improve their stroke) and work on kick drills in order to make sure that the
student has the best chance of successful preparation in the little time
they have to prepare for the class.  As far as long term preparation for a
Red Cross Lifeguarding class goes,  I once prepared a 16 year old
non-swimmer for the class in 4 months.  She had to work very hard to learn
all of the stroke skills she needed and to build endurance but, she was an
outstanding student, is a great lifeguard and now, 5 years later is on our
coaching staff.  Point:  A Red Cross Lifeguarding class is not intense
enough for the average swimmer (knows the strokes - swims laps - comfortable
in the water) to be overly concerned about preparing for - some preparation
yes, a 3-6 mos. training plan - overkill (IMHO)

Now, were we talking about preparing for a USLS program early next
summer.....

Quote:

>Proper weight training will do a lot for flexibility and coordination.
>Properly done it is excellent for physical fitness.

> Life guarding is not only for swimming pools, either.

 
 
 

Advice about working out to improve swimming

Post by cjphill.. » Thu, 17 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Sports Writer needs your quotes on how Canadian Mark Versfeld did in
winning two gold swimming medals at Commonwealth Games. Include name,
city, position in swimming world and commentary. Thanks.