"Swimmers EAR"

"Swimmers EAR"

Post by Mike Fishm » Thu, 16 Jul 1992 05:30:41


I started swimming again 6 months ago and I am loving it.. OR was loving it
I should say.

After getting over a cold (swam right thru the cold) my ears were popping a lot
and I was having trouble hearing. A quick visit to the DR. confirmed that I had
swimmers ear. Her suggestion, stay away from the pool for 7-10 days, use the
antibiotic drops 4x day and check with her before getting back in the pool.

My questions:

1: What is swimmers ear and how do you get it? How can I avoid getting it?
2: Anyone have any experiences with time-off .vs. ear plugs .vs. getting em wet?
3: Does anyone use the drops designed to help you dry out your ears and avoid
sw. ear? Do they work? Any recomendations?

I am being good, staying out of the water.. but sufferring severe withdrawl.
I've been walking, light lifting, lots of digging (the new walk) and plenty
of complaining. My wife is taking advantage and swimming everyday IN MY TIMESLOT
(That's a personal timeslot between kids, work and family - not easy having
two swimmers, two kids and two jobs)

PS If someone could convince the local MAsters to swim at 6am and not 5, I might
even swim for them in the fall. But waking at 4:30am (and NOT FISHING) goes
against my principles. Thanks for the help......

                                                Mike Fishman
                                (part-time engineer and full-time fisherman)                                            
{                                                                             }
{Data General Corp is in no way responsible for my fishing or boating opinions}
{                                                                             }

 
 
 

"Swimmers EAR"

Post by Jeff Dalt » Thu, 16 Jul 1992 15:44:20

Quote:

> ...
> 1: ... How can I avoid getting it?

Go to the drug store and get some rubbing ***.  Ask if they have 90%
consentration.  If they don't, the standard 70% will do.  Put the ***
in a cleaned out dropper (like the ones for eye or nose drops) and take it
to the pool with you.  Every time you get out of the water, put a couple
drops in each ear.  This helps evaporate the water.  It's cheep too.

Disclaimer:  If you use an old eye/nose drop container, be sure you remove
the eye/nose drop lable from the dropper and write on it that is for
EARS ONLY!
--
Jeff Dalton                    If a train station is where a train stops,

ESL Inc., S'vale CA                                     - don't know orgin

 
 
 

"Swimmers EAR"

Post by Steve Goldfie » Fri, 17 Jul 1992 00:36:26


#>> ...
#>> 1: ... How can I avoid getting it?
#>
#>Go to the drug store and get some rubbing ***.  Ask if they have 90%
#>consentration.  If they don't, the standard 70% will do.  Put the ***
#>in a cleaned out dropper (like the ones for eye or nose drops) and take it
#>to the pool with you.  Every time you get out of the water, put a couple
#>drops in each ear.  This helps evaporate the water.  It's cheep too.
#>
#>Disclaimer:  If you use an old eye/nose drop container, be sure you remove
#>the eye/nose drop lable from the dropper and write on it that is for
#>EARS ONLY!
#>--
#>Jeff Dalton                    If a train station is where a train stops,

I dissolve a small amount (about a quarter teaspoon) of
boric acid in the isopropanol. You may still get swimmer's
ear, but, at least in my case, the incidence drops considerably.
You can buy medicinal droppers for a couple of bucks at any
pharmacy. I recommend keeping it in a plastic bag since the
plastic tops of the bottles sometimes crack and leak.

Steve Goldfield

 
 
 

"Swimmers EAR"

Post by Brian Hanaf » Fri, 17 Jul 1992 03:33:34

Quote:

>1: What is swimmers ear and how do you get it? How can I avoid getting it?

_The Physician and Sportsmedicine_ had a feature article on swimmers
ear close to a year ago.  You might want to check your local library
for a copy.

--
Brian Hanafee                         Advanced Decision Systems

(415) 960-7300                        Mountain View, CA 94043-1230

 
 
 

"Swimmers EAR"

Post by William Stenson Blackwe » Fri, 17 Jul 1992 04:44:32

|> I started swimming again 6 months ago and I am loving it.. OR was loving it
|> I should say.
|>
|> After getting over a cold (swam right thru the cold) my ears were popping a lot
|> and I was having trouble hearing. A quick visit to the DR. confirmed that I had
|> swimmers ear. Her suggestion, stay away from the pool for 7-10 days, use the
|> antibiotic drops 4x day and check with her before getting back in the pool.
|> |>
|> My questions:
|> |>
|> 1: What is swimmers ear and how do you get it? How can I avoid getting it?
|> 2: Anyone have any experiences with time-off .vs. ear plugs .vs. getting em wet?
|> 3: Does anyone use the drops designed to help you dry out your ears and avoid
|> sw. ear? Do they work? Any recomendations?

You've pretty much answered question 1 with question 3.  Use Swim-Ear drops.
However, I disagree (minorly), with the previously posted recipe.  Get a pint
bottle of 91% ***, pour out 4 oz.  Take a 4oz. bottle of boric acid, and
combine it with the (larger amount of) ***.  This will give you a better
concentration than just the tsp.  (Boric Acid doesn't come pure...).  Use an old
Swim Ear container to hold this concoction.  It's the easiest and best marked.  Best part
is, you'll never have a problem with ear wax again :).  The reason you use BA, is
that it is the agent that actually does the drying out, the *** kills the germs.
I could have that backwards, so flame away...  (This way of making the drops saves
you roughly $12 over purchasing an equivalent volume of SE brand drops, and this should
last you 6 months.)

As far as part two, Be Your Own Judge.  Having grown up in age group swimming,
and with an M.D. father, I've found that if the pain isn't bad, go ahead and swim.
Use the Swim drops after swimming and the Anti-bacterial Drops as recommended
(especially at night!!!!).  Realize, of course, this is my own experience, and
I have no pretensions of Med School...

--

********************************************************************************
* Bill Blackwell         |  Nothing says "get out of my house!" quite like the *
* Richardson College     |  <clack> <clack> of a round being chambered.        *
* Rice University        |  Nothing says "NOW!" quite like a laser sight on    *
* Houston, TX            |  your groin.                                        *

********************************************************************************

 
 
 

"Swimmers EAR"

Post by James Peter » Fri, 17 Jul 1992 06:11:20

Quote:

>3: Does anyone use the drops designed to help you dry out your ears and avoid
>sw. ear? Do they work? Any recomendations?

the best bet is prevention. i agree with other posters in the use of isopropyl
*** following swimming. basically it will displace the majority of the
water lodged in your ears removing one component of dark, moist, warm en-
vironment.

Quote:
>(That's a personal timeslot between kids, work and family - not easy having
>two swimmers, two kids and two jobs)

>PS If someone could convince the local MAsters to swim at 6am and not 5, I
>might

i would highly recommend the atkinson pool in sudbury ma. there is a highly
motivated group of folks who train there, ted haartz masters swimmer legend,
paul barford tri-athlete of national caliber, and tom/isabel lyndon have
show up when the wayland pool is shutdown. the hours of the pool and the
facilities are both excellent.


regards,

 
 
 

"Swimmers EAR"

Post by Steve Glassm » Fri, 17 Jul 1992 05:26:28

Just to complete the list of home remedies, I use a dash of Hydrogen Peroxide.
(my problems tend toward outer ear problems.) Gives a fun bubbling sound too...

Steve

 
 
 

"Swimmers EAR"

Post by Bruce Holm » Fri, 17 Jul 1992 23:43:57

Since I haven't seen my family recipe, I thought I might add it.
We just use 1/2 rubbing *** and 1/2 white vinegar.

I'd be interested in knowing if there have been any medical studies
comparing plain ***, *** with boric acid, and *** with
acetic acid.

--Bruce

 
 
 

"Swimmers EAR"

Post by Brian Hanaf » Sat, 18 Jul 1992 02:47:49

Quote:


>>1: What is swimmers ear and how do you get it? How can I avoid getting it?

>_The Physician and Sportsmedicine_ had a feature article on swimmers
>ear close to a year ago.  You might want to check your local library
>for a copy.

I checked on this article--it is in the July, 1991 issue and is called
"Swimmer's Ear:  Getting Patients Back in the Water", by Patrice Heinz
Schelkun.

The article includes the following (attributed to Mark Renneker, MD,
assistant clinical professor of Family and Community Medicine at the
University of California in San Francisco: "Many competitive swimmers
who frequently suffer swimmer's ear treat themselves continously with
over-the-counter eardrops.  But some of these products, such as 2%
boric acid, may further de*** the ear canal".

The article also includes a sidebar by the author "Tips to Prevent
Swimmer's Ear", reproduced below without permission:

"An ounce of prevention can go a long way toward breaking the cycle of
ear infections that can plague swimmers or water-sports enthusiasts.
Most strategies emphasize keeping the ear as dry as possible. To help
patients accomplish this, share these tips:
"*  Get the water out of the ears after swimming. Tilt the head and
jump vigorously or gently dry the outer ear with a towel; do not rub.
A hair dryer at its lowest setting held several inches from the ear
also can effectively do the job without trauma.
"* Avoid touching or scratching the ear. This increases exposure of
bacteria to an ear c***that may already be irritated and inflamed.
"* Put a dropperful of a drying agent in the ear at the end of each
swimming session. In most cases, ask you physician to recommend an
over-the-counter preparation.
"* Learn from your physician how to remove impacted debris with a high
velocity stream of water and hydrogen peroxide mixed in equal parts. A
20-cc syringe will provide sufficient flow. This is particularly
helpful for surfers and other frequent ocean swimmers. Similarly,
mothers can flush out debris in the ears of young, beach-going
children by using warm water and a store-bought ear syringe.
"* Wear tight-fitting swim caps and wet suit hoods, especially if you
surf or sailboard. They may not keep water out of the ear, but can
prevent or slow the formation of exostoses (bony growths) by warming
the ears and providing protection from the wind.
"* Avoid using standard was-type earplugs--they're not airtight and
may damage the c***lining if inserted too firmly. Newer silicone
earplugs provide better protection. OtoPlugs (Oto-Med, Inc, lake
Havasu City, AZ) and Doc's Proplugs (International Aquatic Trades,
Inc, Santa Cruz, CA), keep water out with little hearing reduction.
"* Plan ahead to avoid problems. Take extra precautions when traveling
to an area of high ambient temperature and humidity, since this can
predispose a swimmer to infection. Changing pools can often bring on
new problems, too, says William C. McMaster, an Orange, California
orthopedic surgeon who works with the US National Swim Team. 'The last
thing a swimmer wants to do is wind up with a hot ear just before a
major competition.'"

--
Brian Hanafee                         Advanced Decision Systems

(415) 960-7300                        Mountain View, CA 94043-1230