Strokes Per Length

Strokes Per Length

Post by Chip Shan » Tue, 13 Dec 1994 10:05:25


As a newbie, I will use this as my inaugural posting of a new subject.
 Time for a new theme other than Chinese *** and measuring times to
angstroms of seconds.

What is the proper way to count strokes per length?  I know that the
important thing is that one is consistent in the way he or she counts the
strokes, always trying for that optimization of speed and fewest
strokes.  However, whenever anyone says "how many strokes per length did
you count" whenever our coach has us doing drills counting strokes, I
respond "I don't know, how do you count strokes?"

I come out of a turn with my left shoulder down and take my first breath
on my right side after pulling and recoverying with my left arm first.  
Is that first left arm a stroke?

In the middle of the length, I assume that one cycle of a left arm pull and
one right arm pull constitutes two strokes.  Correct?

At the end of the length and going into the next turn, my final pull
(could be with either arm) ends such that both arms are along my side
beneath my hips.  Is that last pull a stroke?

All chatter welcome.  I realize that if one ponders this too much, they
don't have enough to do.

 
 
 

Strokes Per Length

Post by James Tapp » Tue, 13 Dec 1994 18:54:00

: As a newbie, I will use this as my inaugural posting of a new subject.
:  Time for a new theme other than Chinese *** and measuring times to
: angstroms of seconds.

: What is the proper way to count strokes per length?  I know that the
: important thing is that one is consistent in the way he or she counts the
: strokes, always trying for that optimization of speed and fewest
: strokes.  However, whenever anyone says "how many strokes per length did
: you count" whenever our coach has us doing drills counting strokes, I
: respond "I don't know, how do you count strokes?"

: I come out of a turn with my left shoulder down and take my first breath
: on my right side after pulling and recoverying with my left arm first.  
: Is that first left arm a stroke?

: In the middle of the length, I assume that one cycle of a left arm pull and
: one right arm pull constitutes two strokes.  Correct?

: At the end of the length and going into the next turn, my final pull
: (could be with either arm) ends such that both arms are along my side
: beneath my hips.  Is that last pull a stroke?

: All chatter welcome.  I realize that if one ponders this too much, they
: don't have enough to do.

In free and back, it is usual to count each arm pull as a stroke. As for
end effects, provided you are consistent it doesn't make much odds as the
main aim is normally to try to hold or reduce the number of
strokes/length. Normally I count breaths and multiply by 2 (if we do
stroke counting with set breathing patterns I have problems) and then add
1 if my last pull was with the right arm.

--
+------------------------+------------------------------------+---------+
| James Tappin,          | School of Physics & Space Research |  O__    |

|       "If all else fails--read the instructions!"           |         |
+-------------------------------------------------------------+---------+

 
 
 

Strokes Per Length

Post by James G. Ack » Wed, 14 Dec 1994 00:18:30

: What is the proper way to count strokes per length?  I know that the
: important thing is that one is consistent in the way he or she counts the
: strokes, always trying for that optimization of speed and fewest
: strokes.  However, whenever anyone says "how many strokes per length did
: you count" whenever our coach has us doing drills counting strokes, I
: respond "I don't know, how do you count strokes?"

        Any relation to Sara Shand nee Linke?

        Here's how I do it:  coming off the wall my first pull is
with my left arm, opposite the breathing side.  I use that to count
the number of the length I'm on, for example, "5".  I call the count
in my head when that hand touches the water in front of my head.

        Then I breath to the right, and recover.  As the right hand
enters, that's "1".   The next left-hand entry repeats the length
count number, "5" in the example.  So I go down the pool as:

5-1, 5-2, 5-3, 5-4, 5-5, 5-6, 5-7, 5-8.  If I'm doing well, I go into the
turn at the end of the "8" pull.  If I'm tiring, I add an "and" stroke
(the 17th armpull) to go into the turn.  So the turn rhythm in that
case would be 5-8-and <turn>.

        Those reading this may think it sounds repetitively boring,
but I can think about lots of things (for instance, why is the
coach a ***?) "on top" of the stroke/lap count.

===============================================
|  James G. Acker                             |

===============================================
All comments are the personal opinion of the writer
and do not constitute policy and/or opinion of government
or corporate entities.

 
 
 

Strokes Per Length

Post by Martin Lives » Wed, 14 Dec 1994 02:55:02



Quote:
>[edited]
>What is the proper way to count strokes per length?  I know that the
>important thing is that one is consistent in the way he or she counts the
>strokes, always trying for that optimization of speed and fewest
>strokes.  However, whenever anyone says "how many strokes per length did
>you count" whenever our coach has us doing drills counting strokes, I
>respond "I don't know, how do you count strokes?"

I always use the general rule that each motion by a single arm from the time
you place your hand into the water to the time you lift it out counts as a
single stroke.


 
 
 

Strokes Per Length

Post by Tom Gargul » Wed, 14 Dec 1994 05:34:21


Quote:

>    Then I breath to the right, and recover.  As the right hand
> enters, that's "1".   The next left-hand entry repeats the length
> count number, "5" in the example.  So I go down the pool as:

> 5-1, 5-2, 5-3, 5-4, 5-5, 5-6, 5-7, 5-8.  If I'm doing well, I go into the
> turn at the end of the "8" pull.  If I'm tiring, I add an "and" stroke
> (the 17th armpull) to go into the turn.  So the turn rhythm in that
> case would be 5-8-and <turn>.

>    Those reading this may think it sounds repetitively boring,
> but I can think about lots of things (for instance, why is the
> coach a ***?) "on top" of the stroke/lap count.

When working on stroke count I just count laps.  I get my stroke
count on the first lap and then compare this to subsequent laps -
where is my "ending" arm (from first lap) on this lap.  This won't
work if you pick up or drop 2+ strokes as compared to the first
lap, but that doesn't happen to me.

What I like to do on distance sets (4000-8000) is get my stroke count
early (after warming up) and see if I can keep it the same or
reduce it.  This challenge really helps reduce the boredom on long
distance sets.

 
 
 

Strokes Per Length

Post by Terry Laughli » Wed, 14 Dec 1994 12:27:02

Chip:

yes to all your ques. on counting strokes. The important thing is
that you evolve a system that's uniform for you so that the
information you get from your own stroke counting is reliable.
Also try adding strokes plus seconds together in 50's for a game
called Swimming Golf. E.G. 40 sec + 40 strokes = score of 80. Try
to minimize your score by strategically "spending" strokes while
gaining speed (without increasing strokes or even while
subtracting! strokes) Good luck and Happy laps,
Terry Laughlin, Total Immersion *** Swim Camps

 
 
 

Strokes Per Length

Post by John Dugg » Thu, 15 Dec 1994 05:52:47

Quote:

>Also try adding strokes plus seconds together in 50's for a game
>called Swimming Golf. E.G. 40 sec + 40 strokes = score of 80. Try
>to minimize your score by strategically "spending" strokes while
>gaining speed (without increasing strokes or even while
>subtracting! strokes) Good luck and Happy laps,

Technical name for this is SWOLF (don't ask me what the letters stand for)
and it was developed by the Russians (as far as I know.
RE: Stroke counting. I count any underwater pull from entry to thigh as
one stroke. I can ususally manage a 25 Free in 13-14, down to 11 when I'm
shaved. The only grey area is when I'm coming into a turn and don't need a
full pull (back as far as my thigh) to start the turn. This I count as a half.
Basically, right arm pull = 1 stroke, left arm pull = 1 stroke,
left and right arm pull = 1 cycle = two strokes.

Donncha

 
 
 

Strokes Per Length

Post by bi.. » Fri, 16 Dec 1994 20:30:12


Quote:
> Also try adding strokes plus seconds together in 50's for a game
> called Swimming Golf. E.G. 40 sec + 40 strokes = score of 80. Try
> to minimize your score by strategically "spending" strokes while
> gaining speed (without increasing strokes or even while
> subtracting! strokes)

We do a version of this on our team every once in awhile but we add in heart
rate (per 10 seconds) as well.  Thus you add

time-per-50+stroke-count+heart-rate-per-10-seconds=score

It sure is confusing...
but once you get used to it and know around where you are supposed to be it
gets easier to add while you are resting between fifties.  When we did this
last time we did 8 X 50 and you get your golf score on the first, fourth and
last fifty.  Try to go descend the fifities time wise but keep your golf score even
or, ideally, get it lower.  

Hope this helps
Brian