Bilateral breathing

Bilateral breathing

Post by Anto » Sat, 30 Aug 1997 04:00:00


A simple solution is to breath 25 or 50 yards/metres to one side, and
then 25/50 to the other side.  I found this method to provide the
benefits of bi-lateral breathing (more 'balanced' stroke) without the
negative (lack of oxygen).

 
 
 

Bilateral breathing

Post by Jerry Streete » Wed, 03 Sep 1997 04:00:00

Ladnar

A dril that I use to assist with upper body position has the added
effect of assisting bi-lateral breathing.

The swimmer breathes in on the left and then breathes out on the right
on one lap. This is then repeated as in on the right and out on the left
on the next lap. It takes a great deal of control to make it work
correctly. I've had very rapid results with my swimmers using this.

Jerry
CISC

 
 
 

Bilateral breathing

Post by ELVINCEN » Mon, 08 Sep 1997 04:00:00

Is this done every arm pull? or every 3 pulls?

 
 
 

Bilateral breathing

Post by Bryan E. Esqui » Fri, 12 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>Is this done every arm pull? or every 3 pulls?

        EVery 3 pulls.  I for some reason, have trouble doing that, so I
go every 4.  Breathing on every pull is both inefficient and unstreamlined.
You'll lose seconds off your time that way.

--
            Marc Escuro  [R]             They reach into your room,
            Bryan E. Esquire             Just feel their gentle touch.

      http://www2.ucsc.edu/~bashir/      Sad Songs say so much

 
 
 

Bilateral breathing

Post by Mr M.L. Deschoolmeest » Tue, 23 Sep 1997 04:00:00

: Is this done every arm pull? or every 3 pulls?

I should imagine every arm pull would be impossible.  Every 3 is normal but
for stamina try every 5 or 7 or even 9 (gets interesting around there!).

--

Department of Pharmacology  | "When I want your opinion I'll tell you what
University of Liverpool     |  what it is" General Chaos in Asterix

 
 
 

Bilateral breathing

Post by Ryan Vacc » Tue, 23 Sep 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> : Is this done every arm pull? or every 3 pulls?

> I should imagine every arm pull would be impossible.  Every 3 is normal
but
> for stamina try every 5 or 7 or even 9 (gets interesting around there!).

Not impossible...Thomas Darnyi it during his IMs.
 
 
 

Bilateral breathing

Post by ladna » Tue, 23 Sep 1997 04:00:00

Just wanted to thank all who responded to my query regarding how to
improve bilateral breathing. I have tried several methods, but the best
so far has been to practice, practice, practice swimming the weak side
and then do some sets bilateral. I feel like Im learning to swim all
over again, but i seem to be improving both in technique and speed. And
shoulder pain is gone and doesnt seem to be coming back.

Thanks again.

Now, any open water events coming up in Southern California?

 
 
 

Bilateral breathing

Post by John C. Emi » Tue, 23 Sep 1997 04:00:00

.. at every 9 pulls, the object becomes to see stars without actually
blacking out ::chuckle::

just kidding

btw Maglisco doesn't seem too thrilled about hypoxic training in his
latest book.  any real advocates of it out there?

Quote:
> : Is this done every arm pull? or every 3 pulls?

> I should imagine every arm pull would be impossible.  Every 3 is normal but
> for stamina try every 5 or 7 or even 9 (gets interesting around there!).

 
 
 

Bilateral breathing

Post by Mark A. Lope » Wed, 24 Sep 1997 04:00:00

Sure, I'm an advocate, but not for the reasons many think.  I don't believe it
increases your lung volume, or anything like that.  I do however find that it
trains and teaches disiplin in swimmers, especially the young.  Doing a few hyps
every week reminds the body that it doesn't need to breath all the time.  It can
perform on its own without the constant intake of O2.  This can be benificial in
the last 100 of a 200 *** coming off a wall when you want air, but need to
perform a good underwater pull.  Training in swimming is almost always training
your body to handle more (usually much) than what it will encounter in a meet.
Therefore why train the lungs and mind to expect a normal amount or air when they
may need to perform with less in a meet situation.  Does hyp training really help
anything physical?  I don't think so, but mentally it can be very benificial.

Mark Loper

Quote:

> .. at every 9 pulls, the object becomes to see stars without actually
> blacking out ::chuckle::

> just kidding

> btw Maglisco doesn't seem too thrilled about hypoxic training in his
> latest book.  any real advocates of it out there?

> > : Is this done every arm pull? or every 3 pulls?

> > I should imagine every arm pull would be impossible.  Every 3 is normal but
> > for stamina try every 5 or 7 or even 9 (gets interesting around there!).

 
 
 

Bilateral breathing

Post by Mike Ede » Wed, 24 Sep 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> .. at every 9 pulls, the object becomes to see stars without actually
> blacking out ::chuckle::

> just kidding

> btw Maglisco doesn't seem too thrilled about hypoxic training in his
> latest book.  any real advocates of it out there?

> > : Is this done every arm pull? or every 3 pulls?

> > I should imagine every arm pull would be impossible.  Every 3 is
> normal but
> > for stamina try every 5 or 7 or even 9 (gets interesting around
> there!).

   hypoxic work can be an important part of learnig to swim, not only
through pain,  in a relaxed manner.  When combined with low heart rate
and good technique work hypoxic breathing patterns can be usefull for
establishing stability and good body position.  Try something like a 400
breathing ev. 2 on the first 50m, working up to ev. 9 on the last.
WHile swimming really concentrate on holding perfect stroke, attacking
to frot end and really following through on the back end.  After having
done so, one can see why extranauos breaths in a race can be
devastating.  When training with breathing patterns for a race in mind,
hypoxic work is the only thing I can suggest for learning good breath
controll.  Over-distance type work is an established means a training.
I you can go fast for 115m, then you should be able to finnish a 100m
strong.  How can this princeble help but to prove true for breathing
patterns as well?  In addition to these mentioned benifits, hypoxic
breathing is indeed more difficult, placing greater demands upon the
cardio and respatory systems, therefore allowing one to put in more
effort with less muscular strain making it an ideal part of warmups and
warmdowns.  In short, hypoxic breathing can be an extreamly valuable
tool though, like any tool, is no
end-all-wonder-make-everything-allright-magic for producing best
performances, merely a handy weapon in an arsenal of many.
--Mike Edey
"Sanity is not statistical.", George Orwell, "1984"
 
 
 

Bilateral breathing

Post by Shane Peter Esa » Thu, 25 Sep 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> Sure, I'm an advocate, but not for the reasons many think.  I don't believe it
> increases your lung volume, or anything like that.  I do however find that it
> trains and teaches disiplin in swimmers, especially the young.  Doing a few hyps
> every week reminds the body that it doesn't need to breath all the time.  It can
> perform on its own without the constant intake of O2.  This can be benificial in
> the last 100 of a 200 *** coming off a wall when you want air, but need to
> perform a good underwater pull.  Training in swimming is almost always training
> your body to handle more (usually much) than what it will encounter in a meet.
> Therefore why train the lungs and mind to expect a normal amount or air when they
> may need to perform with less in a meet situation.  Does hyp training really help
> anything physical?  I don't think so, but mentally it can be very benificial.

> Mark Loper

Mark
The idea of hypoxic training is going out the window lately.  I think I
agree that is does promote discipline in that the swimmers learn to swim
without O2, but they can get to the same levels of O2 depletion by
swimming faster - this way they will actually "teach" their energy systems
to work faster but increasing their oxidative metabolism to keep up with
the lack of oxygen in the muscles.  You are not training the lungs at all,
generally with hypoxic trainig you are training the "pain" threshold or
the "lack of air" treshold (not to be confused with a lack of ATP via the
oxidative metabolism system).  As well, having the swimmers train without
breathing does teach them to have a more efficient stroke.

All in all (safety not withstanding), I would not recommend  hypoxic
training.

Shane