Bilateral Breathing?

Bilateral Breathing?

Post by Peter Zabors » Fri, 28 Apr 1995 04:00:00


I'm a 34 year old masters swimmer (been at it for 5 yrs) who never swam
competitively.

Only recently have I started bilateral breathing on my FS stroke (ie. every
third stroke) instead of breathing every second stroke always on the same side.

I noticed that I'm slower than before the switch.

Is this due to:
 1. Additional flailing around as I breathe on my "new" side, since I think
I'm not as flexible that way, or

 2. Less oxygen, since I'm only breathing 2/3 as much as I used to, or

 3. A combination of both of these, or

 4. Something else.

Can I expect my times to improve eventually (or at least get back to where
they were), or is bilateral breathing inherently slower???

Any ideas appreciated in advance...

PZ


Calgary AB

 
 
 

Bilateral Breathing?

Post by N J Milla » Sat, 29 Apr 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

> I'm a 34 year old masters swimmer (been at it for 5 yrs) who never swam
> competitively.

> Only recently have I started bilateral breathing on my FS stroke (ie. every
> third stroke) instead of breathing every second stroke always on the same side.

> I noticed that I'm slower than before the switch.

> Is this due to:
>  1. Additional flailing around as I breathe on my "new" side, since I think
> I'm not as flexible that way, or

>  2. Less oxygen, since I'm only breathing 2/3 as much as I used to, or

>  3. A combination of both of these, or

>  4. Something else.

> Can I expect my times to improve eventually (or at least get back to where
> they were), or is bilateral breathing inherently slower???

> Any ideas appreciated in advance...

> PZ


> Calgary AB

I have had the same experience - I've been bilaterally breathing every 3rd
stroke for about 4 months now (on medical advice) after 20 years of
swimming unilaterally every 2 strokes.  

I got slower initially largely due to (1), excess rotation on the alien
side.  In fact, I deliberately slowed the stroke down for the first few
sessions so that I could get used to the new breathing pattern and arm
movements.  

My stroke is gradually getting more relaxed with practise and, although I
am not up to my former speed, I am improving my lap times.  

I don't think bilateral breathing is inherently slower - you effectively
spend more time with your head down and less time breathing - it is just
more difficult to get the rhythm when you are not used to it.

Regards,

       N.J.Millard


 
 
 

Bilateral Breathing?

Post by David Swarbri » Sat, 29 Apr 1995 04:00:00



]I'm a 34 year old masters swimmer (been at it for 5 yrs) who never swam
]competitively.
]
]Only recently have I started bilateral breathing on my FS stroke (ie. every
]third stroke) instead of breathing every second stroke always on the same side.
]
]I noticed that I'm slower than before the switch.
]
Well whatever this was due to; Congratulations.  I keep setting out to make
the change, but as soon as I get a hard set, I seem to forget.

Years ago I used to smoke 60 ciggies a day.  I use this as an excuse.  I
run out of breathe too quickly to breathe much less than every other stroke
in anything much beyond two lengths.

--
David Swarbrick                   |
Swarbrick & Co, Solicitors        | Just Mooting UK Law On Line (Free access)
22 Bradford Road Brighouse HD6 1RW| UK 01484 401139 (24 hrs speeds to 14.4k)

    A cheerful coincidence of Law, Computers, and Common Sense

 
 
 

Bilateral Breathing?

Post by Ray Tayl » Sun, 30 Apr 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

> I'm a 34 year old masters swimmer (been at it for 5 yrs) who never swam
> competitively.

> Only recently have I started bilateral breathing on my FS stroke (ie. every
> third stroke) instead of breathing every second stroke always on the
same side.

> I noticed that I'm slower than before the switch.

I had a lot of difficulty adapting to bi-lateral breathing. A good drill
is one arm pulls doing 25s or 50s pulling and breathing on the side you
are pulling. Do 200-400 of these and then try the bi-lateral breathing,
you'll see its easier.

Cheers,

Ray Taylor

--
"Where's the kaboom! There was supposed to be an Earth-shattering kaboom!"

-Marvin the Martian

 
 
 

Bilateral Breathing?

Post by Kirk Mo » Sun, 30 Apr 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

> I'm a 34 year old masters swimmer (been at it for 5 yrs) who never swam
> competitively.

> Only recently have I started bilateral breathing on my FS stroke (ie. every
> third stroke) instead of breathing every second stroke always on the same side.

> I noticed that I'm slower than before the switch.

> Is this due to:
>  1. Additional flailing around as I breathe on my "new" side, since I think
> I'm not as flexible that way, or

>  2. Less oxygen, since I'm only breathing 2/3 as much as I used to, or

>  3. A combination of both of these, or

>  4. Something else.

> Can I expect my times to improve eventually (or at least get back to where
> they were), or is bilateral breathing inherently slower???

> Any ideas appreciated in advance...

> PZ


> Calgary AB

In my experience both concerns apply.  You undoubtedly have one arm which
is stronger than the other and when this arm is the downside arm at the
time of your breath you will get a better pull than when it isn't.  Most
swimmers automatically breath to the side that causes their strong arm to
be on the down side in the roll during the breath.  If you alternate
breath, you are forced to use your "weak side" equally with your strong
side.  Bilateral breathing will tend to diminish this imbalance aver time
but will not likely eliminate it completely.  Most outstanding swimmers
have somewhat imbalanced stroke with a strong side and a weak side.  As for
the lack of oxygen, this only plays a role if you are exerting yourself
hard enough so that you need to be breathing every stroke.  If so, then
going to an alternate breathing pattern will definietly cut down on the
amount of oxygen you are taking in and force you to slow down in order to
come back in to balance.  I have tried to get around this limitation by
breathing to one side when I am exerting myself on a strenous set, but by
changing the side I breath to with each length.  That way I am not favoring
one side continuously but I can still get as much oxygen as possible.
Despite having swam in this fashion for over a year and a half, I still
have much greater strength and speed when I breath to the left than when I
breath to the right.  Other factors may also be palying a role.  Your
mileage may vary!!


 
 
 

Bilateral Breathing?

Post by Dese » Mon, 01 May 1995 04:00:00

I think it is just a practice problem.  As you become more accustomed and
the bilateral breathing becomes more automatic I think that you'll find
the bilateral breathing to be a benefit in balancing your stoke out and
making you more efficient.

I made the switch to bilateral breathing many years ago.  I was initially
slower, lack of cordination as well as trying change auto muscular
responses.  I made the change for competing in triathlons.  I found that
when I breathed on one side and without a lane line that I was swimming
circles (ie favored the breathing side).  Now however after many years I
find that the bilateral breathing has really balanced out my stroke.
Occasionally I will revert back for a few strokes if I'm really trying to
move due to O2 debt.

Ray Desmarais

 
 
 

Bilateral Breathing?

Post by David Swarbri » Mon, 01 May 1995 04:00:00




]
]> I'm a 34 year old masters swimmer (been at it for 5 yrs) who never swam
]> competitively.
]>
]> Only recently have I started bilateral breathing on my FS stroke (ie. every
]> third stroke) instead of breathing every second stroke always on the
]same side.
]>
]> I noticed that I'm slower than before the switch.
]
]I had a lot of difficulty adapting to bi-lateral breathing. A good drill
]is one arm pulls doing 25s or 50s pulling and breathing on the side you
]are pulling. Do 200-400 of these and then try the bi-lateral breathing,
]you'll see its easier.
]
It occurred to me that there are two problems with bilateral breathing.
If you transfer all at once you have to face both breathing less often, and
also the actual technique of breathing on the wrong side.

Perhaps the solution is to split the two - swimming one length breathing
every second stroke breathing to the wrong side an dthen the next to the other
building up until the technique is as easy on both sides.  This has the
advantage that it is too easy to 'let slide' if you are trying alternate sides
(oops ... I forgot)

Then and only then you might move on to breathing every three strokes.

Cheers,
(I haven't paid for my own advice, why should I take it?)
--
David Swarbrick                   |
Swarbrick & Co, Solicitors        | Just Mooting UK Law On Line (Free access)
22 Bradford Road Brighouse HD6 1RW| UK 01484 401139 (24 hrs speeds to 14.4k)

    A cheerful coincidence of Law, Computers, and Common Sense

 
 
 

Bilateral Breathing?

Post by MR. GREENWO » Tue, 02 May 1995 04:00:00

Looking for some input re: Juice Plus a nutritional product, that
olympic athlete's use as supplement.
Any information would be great.

Thanks

 
 
 

Bilateral Breathing?

Post by STMP » Tue, 09 May 1995 04:00:00

II don't use it, but I went to a promotional meeting about the stuff a
couple of years ago....they had just announced the O.J. Simpson would be
endorsing the product.  Heh heh....

Jim Christian
Atlanta

 
 
 

Bilateral Breathing?

Post by Steven Kingsle » Thu, 11 May 1995 04:00:00

In Aprils edition of 'Which' Magazine there was an article about Juice +.
Which magazine is an independent consumer magazine in Great Britain. They
asked a Health nutrition expert to assesse the value of Juice +, she said
the following.

 " The capsules could not provide the same amount of nutrients or fibre
as five portions of fruit and vegetables a day.  A daily dose of Juice +
gives the same amount of fibre as one segment of an orange ".

The article added that some distributors have gotten carried away with
what  Juice + is capable of and you should refer to official literature
and not claims made by over enthusiastic retailers.