Altitude, who is doing it

Altitude, who is doing it

Post by Iain Ansel » Sat, 27 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Fellow aquanauts and aquanaut coaches, a lot of people are going to
altitude in preparation for major events using the justification that
everyone else is doing it. Is everyone else doing it? Who are they? When
are they going and for how long? Is there any correlation between
successful performance(finalist,medallist) at say, Worlds and Olympics.
The effect would then need to be proven of course. I think it would be
an interesting study. Maybe for some athletic and cycling events as
well.

If coming from a Southern hemisphere Winter to the heat in Atlanta where
would you put your money(so to speak)? On acclimatising to the heat or
altitude training. Could you utilise both effectively? Would the
altitude cold environment hamper any altitude "benefits" with the marked
temperature extremes upon hitting Atlanta.

Interested in your comments. Thank you in advance for your
contributions.

 
 
 

Altitude, who is doing it

Post by Michael Barn » Sat, 03 Feb 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
> Fellow aquanauts and aquanaut coaches, a lot of people are going to
> altitude in preparation for major events using the justification that
> everyone else is doing it. Is everyone else doing it? Who are they? When
> are they going and for how long? Is there any correlation between
> successful performance(finalist,medallist) at say, Worlds and Olympics.
> The effect would then need to be proven of course. I think it would be
> an interesting study. Maybe for some athletic and cycling events as
> well.

> If coming from a Southern hemisphere Winter to the heat in Atlanta where
> would you put your money(so to speak)? On acclimatising to the heat or
> altitude training. Could you utilise both effectively? Would the
> altitude cold environment hamper any altitude "benefits" with the marked
> temperature extremes upon hitting Atlanta.

> Interested in your comments. Thank you in advance for your
> contributions.

I'm not an expert on altitude training, but has anyone heard of swimmers
trying this?  My gut feeling is that it would probablly be a waste of
their time (except maybe, marginally, for backstrokers, and even less so
for ***strokers.

The reasoning (and I haven't exactly thought all of this through).
Runners go to altitude to increase their aeorbic conditioning, i.e., more
speed and distance on less oxygen.  This improves their performance by
delaying the drop in performance brought on by oxygen debt.  Swimming, by
its very nature is anaerobic to begin with.  Many sprinters, especially in
fly train to take as few breaths as possible.  It seems to me that going
to thinner air would merely increase the number of breaths you would have
to take and in the end have the same net result.  I have also heard that
runners like to compete at altitude because of the decreased air
resistance.  This is obviously useless to swimmers.  However, I wonder if
people swim slower in denser salt water?

just some  quick thoughts on the subject.

lator
     mike

--
Michael Lee Barnes - also know as - the original Iridescent Mouse


 
 
 

Altitude, who is doing it

Post by Iron » Sat, 03 Feb 1996 04:00:00

No, you don't swim slower in salt water.  The salt water makes a swimmer
more bouyant, and puts them in a better body position, so in most cases,
salt water only helps.

 
 
 

Altitude, who is doing it

Post by Matt Kendrick/R. Zies » Sat, 03 Feb 1996 04:00:00

  However, I wonder if

Quote:
>people swim slower in denser salt water?

I'm not an expert, just a swimmer. I'm working on my sprints, love to go
fast, but i am a distance swimmer. I usually swim in pools, but durring
the summer, when i go to the beach, i do swim in the ocean, and i do go
slower! But it could be, that i go slower, because swimming in the ocean
freaks me out some, and i figure if i swim into a shark, i'd rather try
to see it coming than sprint right into it! :)
RZ
 
 
 

Altitude, who is doing it

Post by RunnSw » Sat, 03 Feb 1996 04:00:00

Quote:
>>I'm not an expert on altitude training, but has anyone heard of swimmers

trying this?  My gut feeling is that it would probablly be a waste of
their time (except maybe, marginally, for backstrokers, and even less so
for ***strokers....<<

The US National Resident Team trains at Colorado Springs (I think 7000
feet or so).  One swimmer recently left the team, claiming that he could
do better quality work at sea level.

-Larry Weisenthal

 
 
 

Altitude, who is doing it

Post by Michael Barn » Wed, 07 Feb 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

> The US National Resident Team trains at Colorado Springs (I think 7000
> feet or so).  One swimmer recently left the team, claiming that he could
> do better quality work at sea level.

> -Larry Weisenthal

That's interesting, but as a coach myself, I would tend not to place a
great deal of stock in comments like this from solitary swimmers.  If
there was enough difference that everyone was doing it (moving to sea
level for training) it might carrry a little more weight, but I wonder how
much of this swimmers attitude is based on psyching himself into believing
it rather than actual physical benefits.  Does anyone know who this
swimmer was, what kind of success he has been having (both while in
Colorado and after moving)?

lator
   mike

--
Michael Lee Barnes - also know as - the original Iridescent Mouse