Young coach needs help!

Young coach needs help!

Post by Jose Sanche » Mon, 21 Dec 1998 04:00:00


  I"ve been teaching this kid named Cristian to swim for the past 3 years as
part of my small swimming program and team.
He is at the present time 6 years old and today swam for the first time
 in a swimming meet 50m freestyle.

Time 39.34 sec ( which is extremely good at his age), went to the showers
and everyone else were still swimming.

I've seen him grow up the past 3 years and I dont want to over train him but
the parents want him to swim longer practices.

Question:

How many meters per day can a 6 year old swimmer of his stamina and caliber
can take?

The kid has the perfect atitude and also likes to win and swim like crazy.

How far can I push such a young swimmer>?

 
 
 

Young coach needs help!

Post by Jeff » Tue, 22 Dec 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

> Question:

> How many meters per day can a 6 year old swimmer of his stamina and caliber
> can take?

You mean physically?  I don't think you should even be approaching that limit.
At so young an age, all they should be doing is learning technique and good
sportsmanship, and having a good time.

Quote:
> The kid has the perfect atitude and also likes to win and swim like crazy.

> How far can I push such a young swimmer>?

I'd say, just make sure he has fun.   I wouldn't push too hard at age 6.   What
good will it do him if he becomes a phenomenal swimmer at age 8, but then quits
the sport because it's gotten too serious?

Jeff Weiss

 
 
 

Young coach needs help!

Post by MR » Tue, 22 Dec 1998 04:00:00

I have a seven year old kid and he swims
approximately three or four times a week 3500 -
4000 meter. He has the same attitude as your kid.
One of the advantages of working with kids is that
you cannot overtrain them (physically). A child
stops training hard when it is in pain...
BUT you can overtrain him (mentally): so keep it
funny for the kid. Maybe he won't make the same
progress in the first upcoming years but he will
keep on swimming until he is at the age where real
champions are made.

Mike
http://www.infomediasystems.com/mike/

Jose Sanchez heeft geschreven in bericht ...
:
:  I"ve been teaching this kid named Cristian to
swim for the past 3 years as
:part of my small swimming program and team.
:He is at the present time 6 years old and today
swam for the first time
: in a swimming meet 50m freestyle.
:
:Time 39.34 sec ( which is extremely good at his
age), went to the showers
:and everyone else were still swimming.
:
:I've seen him grow up the past 3 years and I dont
want to over train him but
:the parents want him to swim longer practices.
:
:Question:
:
:How many meters per day can a 6 year old swimmer
of his stamina and caliber
:can take?
:
:The kid has the perfect atitude and also likes to
win and swim like crazy.
:
:How far can I push such a young swimmer>?
:
:
:

 
 
 

Young coach needs help!

Post by Sean Hardim » Thu, 24 Dec 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
>I have a seven year old kid and he swims
>approximately three or four times a week 3500 -
>4000 meter.

Is this total meters per week, or total per workout?  I hope it's not
total per workout, that seven year old would be exhausted!

Quote:
>He has the same attitude as your kid.
>One of the advantages of working with kids is that
>you cannot overtrain them (physically).

Where did you get this idea?  Do you understand what the definition of
physical overtraining is?  If so, please explain to me how a child
cannot be physically and physiologically overtrained.  It has been my
experience (and covered in my coursework, FWIW), that anyone can be
overtrained if the training program is not properly designed with
adequate loading and unloading periods taking place.  Granted,
children do have differing adaptive capabilities based on their
physical development.  However, to generalize that kids cannot be
overtrained is not only inaccurate, but dangerous to the health of
these young athletes.

Quote:
> A child stops training hard when it is in pain...

Maybe in some cases, but not in others.  I have coached young athletes
who would compete hurt at a very young age.  I have observed two
extremes...the young athlete who does not recognize that they are hurt
or in pain, and the young athlete who wants to get out because they
feel the slightest tinge of fatigue setting in.

Quote:
>BUT you can overtrain him (mentally): so keep it
>funny for the kid. Maybe he won't make the same
>progress in the first upcoming years but he will
>keep on swimming until he is at the age where real
>champions are made.

Agreed.  The emphasis at a young age should be on fun, and if keeping
it that way for a significant period of time.  Focus on improving the
individual, and you can't go wrong.  Ribbons, medals, etc, will all
come with time, but if you don't enjoy it and focus on personal
improvement, the athlete will be long gone before you can make them
into a champion.

However, for a six year old going sub-40s for 50 free (if this is
possible, it seems somewhat unlikely, although I suppose it could
happen), the trick will be holding his interest in an activity for
which he may find to be boring because he dominates it so.  

Happy holidays.

-----
Sean Hardiman - Victoria, BC, Canada
4th Year Kinesiology - University of Victoria

 
 
 

Young coach needs help!

Post by MR » Thu, 31 Dec 1998 04:00:00

Sean Hardiman heeft geschreven in bericht

:On Mon, 21 Dec 1998 16:48:53 +0100, "MR"


:
:>I have a seven year old kid and he swims
:>approximately three or four times a week 3500 -
:>4000 meter.
:
:Is this total meters per week, or total per
workout?  I hope it's not
:total per workout, that seven year old would be
exhausted!
:
He has never been exhausted... neither are the
other young swimmers.
But re-reading my posting, I've exaggerated a bit,
3500-4000 meters are
the longest workouts we do. We also do workouts of
2500 meters with lots
of technical exercises. Let's say the average is
3000/workout.

:>He has the same attitude as your kid.
:>One of the advantages of working with kids is
that
:>you cannot overtrain them (physically).
:
:Where did you get this idea?  Do you understand
what the definition of
:physical overtraining is?  If so, please explain
to me how a child
:cannot be physically and physiologically
overtrained.  It has been my
:experience (and covered in my coursework, FWIW),
that anyone can be
:overtrained if the training program is not
properly designed with
:adequate loading and unloading periods taking
place.  Granted,
:children do have differing adaptive capabilities
based on their
:physical development.  However, to generalize
that kids cannot be
:overtrained is not only inaccurate, but dangerous
to the health of
:these young athletes.
:
Where i got the idea: j. olbrecht. A man who's a
doctor at the university of ...
(Germany).
He wrote the book "Planning, periodising,
training, adjusting an winning", he
accompanies the Dutch national team (15 medals at
the youngest European
Championships), Brigitte Becue (European Champion
100 ***stroke + European
recordholder), Luc Van Lierde (IRONMAN '97, 2nd in
Hawaii 98, world champion
triathlon 97 and 98), Steve Reys (8th in recent
European Championships 1500
free) and many others...

Lactate analysis shows that children don't go deep
in intensive training.
Intensive (resistance) trainings cannot be done
because children just don't.
 The older they get the more they produce lactic
acid (I hope i use the
correct terms... my first language is dutch).
Maybe you can overtrain them by doing too much of
the same movements
causing tendinitis. But children can do much, if
you see how much children
run or bike in a single day (day in.. day out) you
know what I mean. The moment
you ask too much, young children (age 8-9) will be
bored and stop paying
attention to their stroke ! Once you see too much
of them swimming no
matter how... stop and play !

:> A child stops training hard when it is in
pain...
:
:Maybe in some cases, but not in others.  I have
coached young athletes
:who would compete hurt at a very young age.  I
have observed two
:extremes...the young athlete who does not
recognize that they are hurt
:or in pain, and the young athlete who wants to
get out because they
:feel the slightest tinge of fatigue setting in.
:

My experience says that from age 10, you see two
extremities.... the ones
who don't recognize and the ones who do ! Here is
the task for the coach
to learn them feeling the pulse, adjusting their
speed  and/or do lactate
analysis !

:>BUT you can overtrain him (mentally): so keep it
:>funny for the kid. Maybe he won't make the same
:>progress in the first upcoming years but he will
:>keep on swimming until he is at the age where
real
:>champions are made.
:
:Agreed.  The emphasis at a young age should be on
fun, and if keeping
:it that way for a significant period of time.
Focus on improving the
:individual, and you can't go wrong.  Ribbons,
medals, etc, will all
:come with time, but if you don't enjoy it and
focus on personal
:improvement, the athlete will be long gone before
you can make them
:into a champion.
:
:However, for a six year old going sub-40s for 50
free (if this is
:possible, it seems somewhat unlikely, although I
suppose it could
:happen), the trick will be holding his interest
in an activity for
:which he may find to be boring because he
dominates it so.
:
:Happy holidays.
:
:
:-----
:Sean Hardiman - Victoria, BC, Canada
:4th Year Kinesiology - University of Victoria