Experiences with Speedo's new "Stroke Monitor" watch?

Experiences with Speedo's new "Stroke Monitor" watch?

Post by John C. Peters » Sat, 20 Dec 1997 04:00:00


   Has anyone tried Speedo's new "Stroke Monitor" watch? (It's maybe
best described as a pedometer like device but for swimmers). Sounds like
a great idea in concept, but then again, these high tech toys sometimes
hit the market before all the bugs have been worked out. Information
on pricing and availability would be welcome also. Thanks in advance...

Best Regards, John

--
 ___|___   John C. Peterson, KD6EKQ

  o/ \o    San Diego, CA

 
 
 

Experiences with Speedo's new "Stroke Monitor" watch?

Post by Edward M. Power » Sat, 20 Dec 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
>   Has anyone tried Speedo's new "Stroke Monitor" watch? (It's maybe
>best described as a pedometer like device but for swimmers). Sounds like
>a great idea in concept, but then again, these high tech toys sometimes
>hit the market before all the bugs have been worked out. Information
>on pricing and availability would be welcome also. Thanks in advance...

>Best Regards, John

>--
> ___|___   John C. Peterson, KD6EKQ

>  o/ \o    San Diego, CA

 One of the developers posted here discussing this product.  I was
disappointed to learn that it performs most of its magic by using a
baseline 'test' swim that's used for future calculations.  That makes it an
aquatic pedometer.  One of the things that e***d me when I first heard
about it was that it somehow kept track of both stroke counts and
intervals...now *that* would be something!

On another note, I recently received a membership solicitation from the
Swimming Hall of Fame, who was throwing a Speedo Stroke Monitor in for free
with a $125 membership.  They are $90-$99 in catalogs (I've seen it in
Kast-A-Way).

Ed Powers
Greater Columbus Masters http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

Experiences with Speedo's new "Stroke Monitor" watch?

Post by Bill Geise » Sat, 20 Dec 1997 04:00:00

Quote:



>>   Has anyone tried Speedo's new "Stroke Monitor" watch? (It's maybe
>>best described as a pedometer like device but for swimmers). Sounds like
>>a great idea in concept, but then again, these high tech toys sometimes
>>hit the market before all the bugs have been worked out. Information
>>on pricing and availability would be welcome also. Thanks in advance...

>>Best Regards, John

>>--
>> ___|___   John C. Peterson, KD6EKQ

>>  o/ \o    San Diego, CA

> One of the developers posted here discussing this product.  I was
>disappointed to learn that it performs most of its magic by using a
>baseline 'test' swim that's used for future calculations.  That makes it an
>aquatic pedometer.  One of the things that e***d me when I first heard
>about it was that it somehow kept track of both stroke counts and
>intervals...now *that* would be something!

>On another note, I recently received a membership solicitation from the
>Swimming Hall of Fame, who was throwing a Speedo Stroke Monitor in for free
>with a $125 membership.  They are $90-$99 in catalogs (I've seen it in
>Kast-A-Way).

>Ed Powers
>Greater Columbus Masters http://SportToday.org/

I'm the developer Ed mentioned and would like to clarify a few points.
Speedo sells TWO stroke monitors: A "Fitness" monitor designed for lap and
fitness swimmers. And a "Competitive" monitor designed for competitive
swimmers and triathletes.

The comments Ed makes are correct - for the Speedo FITNESS monitor only. It
requires a one-time calibration, where the swimmer enters their body weight
and swims a specific distance (so the monitor can calculate average distance
per stroke).  Conceptually it resembles a pedometer it terms of calculating
distance swam the number of calories burned. However, it also provids a
real-time count of stroke cycles and provides the average cycle rate
(cycles/minute) at the end of each swim.

Speedo's COMPETITIVE model requires absolutely no calibration. This monitor
may be of more interest to competitive swimmers and / or triathletes. It was
designed to be more of data aquisition device, rather than a swimming
pedometer. It provides the following data after every swim:
-Elapsed time
-Total number of stroke cycles (one cycle = two strokes)
-Distance per stroke cycle (in either yards or meters)
-Cycle rate (cycles per minute)
-SEI (swim efficiency index, a relative index indicating overall speed AND
efficiency)
-Speed (yards or meters per second)

This model was designed to: assist swimmers in finding their optimum
combination of stroke length & stroke rate; analyze the impact of fatigue;
help swimmers develop muscle memory  (a repeatable stroke under fatigue or
pressure); and pin-point problems in technique and/or stroke efficiency.

I hope this clarifies the difference between the two different stroke
monitors Speedo is currently selling.


Strokz Digital Sports, Inc., Dallas, TX
v: 972-392-481  f: 972-392-2703

 
 
 

Experiences with Speedo's new "Stroke Monitor" watch?

Post by William A. T. Cla » Sat, 20 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Quote:




> >>   Has anyone tried Speedo's new "Stroke Monitor" watch? (It's maybe
> >>best described as a pedometer like device but for swimmers). Sounds like
> >>a great idea in concept, but then again, these high tech toys sometimes
> >>hit the market before all the bugs have been worked out. Information
> >>on pricing and availability would be welcome also. Thanks in advance...

> >>Best Regards, John

> >>--
> >> ___|___   John C. Peterson, KD6EKQ

> >>  o/ \o    San Diego, CA

> > One of the developers posted here discussing this product.  I was
> >disappointed to learn that it performs most of its magic by using a
> >baseline 'test' swim that's used for future calculations.  That makes it an
> >aquatic pedometer.  One of the things that e***d me when I first heard
> >about it was that it somehow kept track of both stroke counts and
> >intervals...now *that* would be something!

> >On another note, I recently received a membership solicitation from the
> >Swimming Hall of Fame, who was throwing a Speedo Stroke Monitor in for free
> >with a $125 membership.  They are $90-$99 in catalogs (I've seen it in
> >Kast-A-Way).

> >Ed Powers
> >Greater Columbus Masters http://SportToday.org/

> I'm the developer Ed mentioned and would like to clarify a few points.
> Speedo sells TWO stroke monitors: A "Fitness" monitor designed for lap and
> fitness swimmers. And a "Competitive" monitor designed for competitive
> swimmers and triathletes.

> The comments Ed makes are correct - for the Speedo FITNESS monitor only. It
> requires a one-time calibration, where the swimmer enters their body weight
> and swims a specific distance (so the monitor can calculate average distance
> per stroke).  Conceptually it resembles a pedometer it terms of calculating
> distance swam the number of calories burned. However, it also provids a
> real-time count of stroke cycles and provides the average cycle rate
> (cycles/minute) at the end of each swim.

> Speedo's COMPETITIVE model requires absolutely no calibration. This monitor
> may be of more interest to competitive swimmers and / or triathletes. It was
> designed to be more of data aquisition device, rather than a swimming
> pedometer. It provides the following data after every swim:
> -Elapsed time
> -Total number of stroke cycles (one cycle = two strokes)
> -Distance per stroke cycle (in either yards or meters)
> -Cycle rate (cycles per minute)
> -SEI (swim efficiency index, a relative index indicating overall speed AND
> efficiency)
> -Speed (yards or meters per second)

> This model was designed to: assist swimmers in finding their optimum
> combination of stroke length & stroke rate; analyze the impact of fatigue;
> help swimmers develop muscle memory  (a repeatable stroke under fatigue or
> pressure); and pin-point problems in technique and/or stroke efficiency.

> I hope this clarifies the difference between the two different stroke
> monitors Speedo is currently selling.


> Strokz Digital Sports, Inc., Dallas, TX
> v: 972-392-481  f: 972-392-2703

It seems to me that it would be possible to combine both these functions
in a single watch, by being able to switch the cpu from one mode to
another, in the same way that Iron Man and other watches can operate in
different modes.

It would also be useful to have a memory capability to store several
calibrations, so that as one changes from swimming to pulling to working
with fins, and so on, the appropriate calibration could be selected, and
the watch used to monitor output.

Just a thought.

William Clark

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Experiences with Speedo's new "Stroke Monitor" watch?

Post by Bill Geise » Sat, 20 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
>It seems to me that it would be possible to combine both these functions
>in a single watch, by being able to switch the cpu from one mode to
>another, in the same way that Iron Man and other watches can operate in
>different modes.

>It would also be useful to have a memory capability to store several
>calibrations, so that as one changes from swimming to pulling to working
>with fins, and so on, the appropriate calibration could be selected, and
>the watch used to monitor output.

>Just a thought.

>William Clark

Excellent thought. I neglected to mention both models (Fitness and
Competition)
include:
-swim recall mode (saves/recalls up to 30 swims)
-Time/date mode (12/24 hr. format)
-Chronograph mode
-Timer mode (CDS, CDR)
-Alarm mode

This allows each to be worn in or out of the pool. A photo of the Fitness
monitor can be viewed at the following web site:
http://www.bould.com/strokz.html

-Bill Geiser

 
 
 

Experiences with Speedo's new "Stroke Monitor" watch?

Post by Paul Turne » Mon, 22 Dec 1997 04:00:00

Where abouts can you buy this speedo monitor  in Australia or altern. on the
net.

Thanks PT

 
 
 

Experiences with Speedo's new "Stroke Monitor" watch?

Post by George Van No » Sun, 28 Dec 1997 04:00:00

Thanks Bill for elucidation:

However, when using the fitness model, what happens if you drop your speed
by, say, 25% after baselining?  Will the monitor still give you accurate
information?

You refer to the competative model as being more of a data acquisition
device than a pedometer:  well, does it actually count your strokes?  How
does it know laps?  Or do you enter the lap count in at the end of a swim?

The picture you refered to as of the fitness model, looks great, but does
the competitive model look similar or is it the old "watch" looking model?

Thanks.

George Van Noy


SNIPSNIP>

Quote:
>I'm the developer Ed mentioned and would like to clarify a few points.
>Speedo sells TWO stroke monitors: A "Fitness" monitor designed for lap and
>fitness swimmers. And a "Competitive" monitor designed for competitive
>swimmers and triathletes.

>The comments Ed makes are correct - for the Speedo FITNESS monitor only. It
>requires a one-time calibration, where the swimmer enters their body weight
>and swims a specific distance (so the monitor can calculate average
distance
>per stroke).  Conceptually it resembles a pedometer it terms of calculating
>distance swam the number of calories burned. However, it also provids a
>real-time count of stroke cycles and provides the average cycle rate
>(cycles/minute) at the end of each swim.

>Speedo's COMPETITIVE model requires absolutely no calibration. This monitor
>may be of more interest to competitive swimmers and / or triathletes. It
was
>designed to be more of data aquisition device, rather than a swimming
>pedometer. It provides the following data after every swim:
>-Elapsed time
>-Total number of stroke cycles (one cycle = two strokes)
>-Distance per stroke cycle (in either yards or meters)
>-Cycle rate (cycles per minute)
>-SEI (swim efficiency index, a relative index indicating overall speed AND
>efficiency)
>-Speed (yards or meters per second)

>This model was designed to: assist swimmers in finding their optimum
>combination of stroke length & stroke rate; analyze the impact of fatigue;
>help swimmers develop muscle memory  (a repeatable stroke under fatigue or
>pressure); and pin-point problems in technique and/or stroke efficiency.

>I hope this clarifies the difference between the two different stroke
>monitors Speedo is currently selling.


>Strokz Digital Sports, Inc., Dallas, TX
>v: 972-392-481  f: 972-392-2703