Learning the fly

Learning the fly

Post by Gleshna » Sat, 17 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Now that I am monofin swimming regularly, I thought I might was well give the
fly a try.  

1. Can you swim the fly if you have tight shoulders?

2. I have seen some swimmers using Zoomers and doing a kind of *** stroke
with a fly kick.  Is this some sort of a learning progression?

3. For the next few weeks I will have to do it with just one arm, but I think
that even this could help me get the feel for the timing.

Bob

 
 
 

Learning the fly

Post by Bill Condui » Sat, 17 Jul 1999 04:00:00

                Bob... read a book.

            bill conduit
            etc.

Quote:

> Now that I am monofin swimming regularly, I thought I might was well give the
> fly a try.

> 1. Can you swim the fly if you have tight shoulders?

> 2. I have seen some swimmers using Zoomers and doing a kind of *** stroke
> with a fly kick.  Is this some sort of a learning progression?

> 3. For the next few weeks I will have to do it with just one arm, but I think
> that even this could help me get the feel for the timing.

> Bob


 
 
 

Learning the fly

Post by Ken Cherto » Sat, 17 Jul 1999 04:00:00

Quote:
>Now that I am monofin swimming regularly, I
>thought I might was well give the fly a try.
>1. Can you swim the fly if you have tight
>shoulders?
>2. I have seen some swimmers using Zoomers
>and doing a kind of *** stroke with a fly kick.
>Is this some sort of a learning progression?
>3. For the next few weeks I will have to do it
>with just one arm, but I think that even this
>could help me get the feel for the timing.

I used to compete in fly events and the reason I put that in the past
tense relates directly to your first question.

Yes, it is possible to swim the fly with tight shoulders, but I can tell
you from experience it can be very painful.  I injured my shoulder
several years ago and stupidly tried to swim fly on it.  As a result, I
worsened the injury to the point that I couldn't swim fly at all without
pain, for several years (fortunately it didn't affect free or back).  So
I would advise you to wait until your shoulder is completely healed
before you try to do fly pulls on it.  Focus on the dolphin kick for the
time being -- from my experience that's the critical element of fly and
the hardest part to master, anyway.

As for the other questions,  ***stroke pull with dolphin kick is a
standard drill for both ***roke and fly (at least on my team).  One
arm fly is also a standard drill for fly.

Ken Chertoff
http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

Learning the fly

Post by Steve Freide » Wed, 21 Jul 1999 04:00:00

I can't imagine doing the fly with tight shoulders.  One thing I find
helps when mine start to feel tight is to hold the lip of the pool with
my hands behind me and do a relaxed lean forward - helps stretch things
out a bit.  Hanging from a chin-up bar (which you can buy just about
anywhere these days) can be good, too.

I found a teacher/coach indispensable to learning butterfly correctly; I
think the advice to read a book is pretty useless.  I'm fortunate that
the basic arm motion is a natural for me; if the timing and the kick
came to me naturally as well, I could call myself a natural butterfly
swimmer <smile>, but I had to work long and hard with my instructor on
getting all the pieces in place, and did all sorts of different drills.

The drill I like the most is the easiest one and the one I warm up with
for butterfly.  My coach called it 'dolphin dives'.  With your arms in
front of you, you bend in the middle and 'dive' towards the bottom of
the pool, then you curl up and start towards the surface, then dolphin
kick to continue moving towards the surface and up for a breath.  You
can do this with a sculling (***roke) hand motion as your face comes
out of the water or, once you get the hang of it, you can do the whole
thing, especially with fins of any sort on, without any help from your
hands.  The idea is to exagerate the wave motion of the stroke in a
slow, relaxed form.  I find it really gets you into the right frame of
mind for butterflying, and it helps loosen my back up as well.

I usually do this drill and some dolphin-kick-only for a few lengths
before I switch to the full stroke.

-S-

Quote:

> Now that I am monofin swimming regularly, I thought I might was well give the
> fly a try.

> 1. Can you swim the fly if you have tight shoulders?

> 2. I have seen some swimmers using Zoomers and doing a kind of *** stroke
> with a fly kick.  Is this some sort of a learning progression?

> 3. For the next few weeks I will have to do it with just one arm, but I think
> that even this could help me get the feel for the timing.

> Bob

--
I'm Steve Freides.  A bit about me:

Doctor of Musical Arts in Ch***Conducting from SUNY Stony Brook.
Masters of Music in Ch***Conducting from Mannes College of Music, NYC.
Bachelors of Music in Voice from Temple University, Philadelphia, PA.

Former member of the Techniques of Music Faculty (Theory and
Ear-Training)
at the Mannes College, also its Extension Division, also former Director
of the Chorus in its Preparatory Division.  Private guitar teacher from
age 16 to 27.

Currently President of Friday's Computer, Inc., a small (five people)
consulting firm in Ridgewood, NJ that writes customized data processing
and data management software for clients large and small, and is an
"out" source for data conversion and data processing needs for business.

 
 
 

Learning the fly

Post by BAYCITVIDG » Thu, 22 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>I can't imagine doing the fly with tight shoulders.  One thing I find
>helps when mine start to feel tight is to hold the lip of the pool
with
>my hands behind me and do a relaxed lean forward - helps stretch
things
>out a bit.

        why not just do three or four laps
        of fly/dolphin only...just the
        initial arms doing the motion as the
        kicks determine how the body will
            undulate through the water.  

        doing the undulation to the 1 2  3 4
        beat of the kick gets the body going
        at that rhythum also as you go down
        the pool.  

        do it with arms extended in prayer position
        do it with arms at side

        this way you get the kick taking over as prime

        that sets in motion the 1 2   3 4 of the kick.

        you can emphasize it as pronounced as you desire.  

        bill conduit
        etc.  

        it worked for me.  just got me into the mood and
        then begain the stroke it just felt so smooth.  

 
 
 

Learning the fly

Post by Gleshna » Thu, 22 Jul 1999 04:00:00

Thanks for the response.

Quote:
>Hanging from a chin-up bar (which you can buy just about
>anywhere these days) can be good, too.

I have done plenty of that and even work competitive horizontal bar in college,
yet my shoulders are damn tight.

Quote:
>The drill I like the most is the easiest one and the one I warm up with
>for butterfly....

Thanks.

Bob  

 
 
 

Learning the fly

Post by Stuart Ballar » Fri, 23 Jul 1999 04:00:00

Do yoga!
Iyengar yoga is great for strength and flexibility.
Go on give it a go, you'll love it!

Stuart
UK.

 
 
 

Learning the fly

Post by Gleshna » Fri, 23 Jul 1999 04:00:00

Quote:
>o yoga!
>Iyengar yoga is great for strength and flexibility.
>Go on give it a go, you'll love it!

I do yoga.  My shoulders are still tight.

Bob

 
 
 

Learning the fly

Post by mywa » Fri, 23 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
(Gleshna99) writes:

>>o yoga!
>>Iyengar yoga is great for strength and flexibility.
>>Go on give it a go, you'll love it!

>I do yoga.  My shoulders are still tight.

>Bob

        did you ever think that maybe
        reading all these swim books
        are making you tired?  That
        maybe you are cut out to do
        another sport.   Where reading
        is primary.  

        bill conduit
        etc.