Open water swimming

Open water swimming

Post by Andrew J. Hua » Sat, 06 Jun 1992 01:31:10


With the summer coming on, does anybody have anything to say about open
water swimming?

I've never done much but it was really enjoyable, sort of like bicycling
through country vs laps on a track.

I have one main question, without lane markers on the bottom, how does
one navigate a straight course?  My crawl always seems to drift
badly to one side, most likely because I'm stronger on one side, but I
don't feel it.  How do I solve this?

-andy

 
 
 

Open water swimming

Post by Brian Sheld » Sat, 06 Jun 1992 08:48:28

Quote:
>I have one main question, without lane markers on the bottom, how does
>one navigate a straight course?  My crawl always seems to drift
>badly to one side, most likely because I'm stronger on one side, but I
>don't feel it.  How do I solve this?

As any triathlete will tell you, the key to swimming in a reasonably
straight line in open water is to look up.

What I do is every third stroke (freestyle), after I breathe, roll my
head forward until my eyes are water level, then down; all in one
smooth motion.

Granted, this won't correct your stroke.  But, if you swim in open
water enough, you'll get sick of correcting your direction, and eventually
start swimming in a straight line.

-Brian Shelden


 
 
 

Open water swimming

Post by Mike Gilson ............... x 31 » Sat, 06 Jun 1992 18:34:19

Quote:

>>I have one main question, without lane markers on the bottom, how does
>>one navigate a straight course?  My crawl always seems to drift
>>badly to one side, most likely because I'm stronger on one side, but I
>>don't feel it.  How do I solve this?

> As any triathlete will tell you, the key to swimming in a reasonably
> straight line in open water is to look up.

> What I do is every third stroke (freestyle), after I breathe, roll my
> head forward until my eyes are water level, then down; all in one
> smooth motion.

        I do the same, although I look up less frequently.  You need
        to practice this in the pool for two reasons: 1) you need to
        develop your neck muscles; and 2) you need to perform this
        quickly and smoothly or your hips will drop.

Quote:
> Granted, this won't correct your stroke.  But, if you swim in open
> water enough, you'll get sick of correcting your direction, and eventually
> start swimming in a straight line.

        What will correct your stroke is swimming in the pool with your
        eyes closed.  You might also examine which side you drift
        toward.  Is it to your breathing side?  If so, bilateral breathing
        will go a long way toward correcting your drift.

 
 
 

Open water swimming

Post by Shane P Es » Sat, 06 Jun 1992 23:43:30


Quote:
>With the summer coming on, does anybody have anything to say about open
>water swimming?

>I've never done much but it was really enjoyable, sort of like bicycling
>through country vs laps on a track.

>I have one main question, without lane markers on the bottom, how does
>one navigate a straight course?  My crawl always seems to drift
>badly to one side, most likely because I'm stronger on one side, but I
>don't feel it.  How do I solve this?

>-andy

Pick a point on the otherside of the lake (usually open waters
are swum in lakes) and every 30 seconds or so look up and make
sure you are heading towards the object you have chosen.  If not,
alter your direction so you are. This will be difficult at first,
but will get much easier as you practice it.  Also, if the lake
is quite cool (<74 deg F) you may want to consider getting a
wetsuit (trisuit?) to keep you warmer, as well as more buoyant.

Shane Esau
Univ of Calgary Tri Team

 
 
 

Open water swimming

Post by jaffst » Wed, 10 Jun 1992 21:40:58


Quote:
>With the summer coming on, does anybody have anything to say about open
>water swimming?

>I've never done much but it was really enjoyable, sort of like bicycling
>through country vs laps on a track.

>I have one main question, without lane markers on the bottom, how does
>one navigate a straight course?  My crawl always seems to drift
>badly to one side, most likely because I'm stronger on one side, but I
>don't feel it.  How do I solve this?

>-andy

In open water swimming, the best way to navigate is with a technique known
as "sight-breathing" where you lift your head slightly every few strokes
to keep track of a buoy or something.  You can practice this in a pool by
employing it into your training (sight-breathe 2 or 3 times a length).

Another strategy people use in open water racing is drafting.  Not only do
you benefit by the drag, but (if you have faith) you can just follow the
person's feet and save a lot of energy by not lifting your head.

aron

 
 
 

Open water swimming

Post by Brian Hanaf » Sun, 14 Jun 1992 02:52:06

  My wife is about to try her first open water swim, and would like
some advice on starting strategies.  She was a distance swimmer in
college, has been training a lot recently, and assures me that she can
make 1:20 100 yd splits for at least 2 miles.  She's also been
training in the lake (Del Valle, in Livermore CA) and is sure she can
deal with the temperature with no problem.  So, does anyone have any
pointers for starts in open water?

Thanks in advance,

Brian Hanafee

--
Brian Hanafee                         Advanced Decision Systems

(415) 960-7300                        Mountain View, CA 94043-1230

 
 
 

Open water swimming

Post by todd.r.jens » Tue, 16 Jun 1992 22:32:41

Quote:

>  My wife is about to try her first open water swim, and would like
>some advice on starting strategies.  She was a distance swimmer in
>college, has been training a lot recently, and assures me that she can
>make 1:20 100 yd splits for at least 2 miles.  She's also been
>training in the lake (Del Valle, in Livermore CA) and is sure she can
>deal with the temperature with no problem.  So, does anyone have any
>pointers for starts in open water?

>Thanks in advance,

>Brian Hanafee

If it's a mass start like in triathlons, she should be prepared to go hard
right from the gun so she can draft off the leaders.  If you miss the train
at the start, you'll never get on.

Also, be prepared to be kicked, punched, and swam over by adrenalin-pumped
people.

Before starting, look for tall or big landmarks to use as references while in
the water - those orange buoys can be hard to see when everyone is making
waves.

Godd luck!

Todd Jensen                                  o
AT&T Bell Labs             ___^o_    __o    <|\
(708) 979-1254                     _ \<_     \

 
 
 

Open water swimming

Post by James Peter » Wed, 17 Jun 1992 03:07:25


Quote:

>>  My wife is about to try her first open water swim, and would like
>>some advice on starting strategies.  She was a distance swimmer in
>>college, has been training a lot recently, and assures me that she can
>>make 1:20 100 yd splits for at least 2 miles.  She's also been
>>training in the lake (Del Valle, in Livermore CA) and is sure she can
>>deal with the temperature with no problem.  So, does anyone have any
>>pointers for starts in open water?

>If it's a mass start like in triathlons, she should be prepared to go hard
>right from the gun so she can draft off the leaders.  If you miss the train
>at the start, you'll never get on.

>Also, be prepared to be kicked, punched, and swam over by adrenalin-pumped
>people.

>Before starting, look for tall or big landmarks to use as references while in
>the water - those orange buoys can be hard to see when everyone is making
>waves.

there are major differences between a beach start and a water start.
regardless of the start i try to get on an end instead of the middle of pack.
pick the side closest to the first turn that way you are inside and can force
the other swimmers to go wide.
a water start can be real scary especially if you have to tread water at
the starting line. i prefer beach starts running through surf. most swimmers
dive in too early instead of hurdling the tide til they about waist deep.
navigation in open water is extremely important. if the buoys are not large
enough the swimmers cannot see them until they are on top of them. the larger
the buoys the better.

regards,