Speed gains from drafting

Speed gains from drafting

Post by Kirk Mo » Mon, 25 Apr 1994 01:29:12


Everyone I have spoken with has told me that you will usually swim faster
in a team workout than you do if you do the same workout by yourself alone
in a pool.  I assume that this is due to a combination of increased speed
from peer pressure /adrenaline/fear and from drafting effects.  Do any of
you have personal experiences with *how big* an effect this is.  Do you
know how your splits on sets (or the makable intervals) change when you go
from swimming alone to swimming on a team?
--
Kirk Moon

 
 
 

Speed gains from drafting

Post by Eric Chart » Tue, 26 Apr 1994 13:29:08

Swimmers usually lose between 10 to 15% less energy by following someone close
(less than an interval of 3 sec. or less than 2m) in a practice or in a
triathlon due only by the drag effect.

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+---------------------------------------+------------------------------------+

|  Head Coach                           |          ======================    |
|  Club Aqua-Elite de Charny Swim Club  |  Computer Science and Mathematics  |
|  Regroupement Chaudiere-Appalaches    |  Universite Laval                  |
|                                       |  Ste-Foy, Quebec, Canada           |
+---------------------------------------+------------------------------------+

 
 
 

Speed gains from drafting

Post by Timothy B. Madd » Wed, 27 Apr 1994 05:49:48

It's hard to truly quantify the psychological benefit you get from
training with others, the physical effects of drafting are a lot
easier to measure.  In fact, if I'm swimming in the pool and catch
up to somebody to the point where I'm at their pace (not appreciably
slowed) and drafting, that tends to psych me up too... maybe I gloat
a little: "heh heh, I caught you, now try to get away while I suck
at your hapless heels."

If swimming alone, usually the best I can do is sets of 100's on or
around a 1:30 pace, with my current masters team we go as low as a
1:15 pace (freestyle swimming), this is almost entirely due to the
'psych' I get from competing with others.  We keep each other motivated,
splash/hassle/bug each other, make jokes, pick on the coach, it all
adds to the enjoyment of the workout.  Since we are enjoying ourselves,
we aren't bored... boredom to me is the #1 workout killer.  I can't
do more than 1000 yds straight alone without getting really bored.
Since we keep going, the long-term benefit of finishing the workout
at a much harder pace is readily apparent.

This long-term benefit of working _harder_ is much more important
than the short-term gain you get by drafting.  In fact, we try to
go 10s apart, or at least 5s apart, to prevent drafting and promote
actual training.

Drafting during a race is something else entirely.

- tim

 
 
 

Speed gains from drafting

Post by James G. Ack » Wed, 27 Apr 1994 22:24:54

: Everyone I have spoken with has told me that you will usually swim faster
: in a team workout than you do if you do the same workout by yourself alone
: in a pool.  I assume that this is due to a combination of increased speed
: from peer pressure /adrenaline/fear and from drafting effects.  Do any of
: you have personal experiences with *how big* an effect this is.  Do you
: know how your splits on sets (or the makable intervals) change when you go
: from swimming alone to swimming on a team?

        One example:  about 2 years ago, I'd say that swimming by
myself I'd be hurting to do a 6:00 500 yd. freestyle.  I.e. I could
do it all out.  With the team (but no drafting, only 1-2 per lane)
we did 4 x 500 on 8:00 descending.  The last all-out try-to-beat-everybody
500 was a 5:49.

===============================================
|  James G. Acker                             |

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