Doing lengths in a short pool

Doing lengths in a short pool

Post by Adele Fras » Fri, 22 Sep 1995 04:00:00


Greetings all!

For the last two years I have not had regular access to a 25 metre (or
25 year) pool.  My apartment complex has a pool that I can easily
access, but it is only 13 yards long.  And this seems to be what I am
stuck with.

Even if I swim for so many minutes, I am forever reaching the side,
turning, and pushing off and then gliding half the pool.

The only solution that I have come up with is to find a way to slow me
dowm.  I have toyed with the idea of constructing some sort of a "drag
belt" which would create enough drag to slow my speed 1/2 while
letting me work out at a normal rate.  However, I don't know if these
things already exist or how to go about constucting one.

Any thoughts about significantly increasing drag in the pool OR
other methods for dealing with a short pool would be greatly appreciated.

Adele.

 
 
 

Doing lengths in a short pool

Post by Cory Macki » Sat, 23 Sep 1995 04:00:00


writes:

Quote:

>Greetings all!

>Any thoughts about significantly increasing drag in the pool OR
>other methods for dealing with a short pool would be greatly
appreciated.

>Adele.

Adele-

Try the "swimming in place" approach.  When I was in high school, we
did drills using a belt and surgical tubing, which was attached to the
starting blocks.  Upon stretching out the tubing to a certain point, we
were swimming in place.  You could do repetitions of 3 minutes with 15
seconds rest in between to duplicate a set of 200's, for example.
Attaching the tubing to a diving board or ladder may be a substitute
for the starting block.  Good luck.

 
 
 

Doing lengths in a short pool

Post by sandila.. » Sat, 23 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

>writes:
>>Any thoughts about significantly increasing drag in the pool OR
>>other methods for dealing with a short pool would be greatly
>appreciated.

>>Adele.

Three thoughts:

1. An inexpensive way to increase drag is to swim wearing a pair of baggy
shorts, preferably ones with big loose pockets.  These have been sold as
drag suits, but you can fashion your own.  You'll need a tight belt to keep
them on.

2. But be wary of this kind of resistance swimming.  It greatly increases
the chances of injury. If you do do it, make sure you warm up your
shoulders, perhaps with using some surgical tubing tied to a doorknob or
wall hook and simulating swim pulling.  And do your stretches!

3.  A swimmer from here made it the 1972 Canadian Olympic team and his main
training pool was 12 yds.  He did lots of dryland training and his turns
were fantastic!  So short pools can be useful.
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Doing lengths in a short pool

Post by Mike Ehle » Sat, 23 Sep 1995 04:00:00

|> Greetings all!
|>
|> For the last two years I have not had regular access to a 25 metre (or
|> 25 year) pool.  My apartment complex has a pool that I can easily
|> access, but it is only 13 yards long.  And this seems to be what I am
|> stuck with.
|>
|> Even if I swim for so many minutes, I am forever reaching the side,
|> turning, and pushing off and then gliding half the pool.
|>
|> The only solution that I have come up with is to find a way to slow me
|> dowm.  I have toyed with the idea of constructing some sort of a "drag
|> belt" which would create enough drag to slow my speed 1/2 while
|> letting me work out at a normal rate.  However, I don't know if these
|> things already exist or how to go about constucting one.
|>
|> Any thoughts about significantly increasing drag in the pool OR
|> other methods for dealing with a short pool would be greatly appreciated.
|>
|> Adele.

The concept of a drag suit is an interesting one.  When I swam in
high school (many years ago) we had these suits that had really big
pockets that would act as a "brake".  We also would wear t-shirts
hoping that the extra drag would help us build strength (our high
school didn't have a weight room).

Anyone else wear t-shirts or a drag suit when swimming?

Mike

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Doing lengths in a short pool

Post by RunnSw » Sat, 23 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Quote:
>>My apartment complex has a pool that I can easily access, but it is only

13 yards long.  And this seems to be what I am stuck with.<<

In my previous job, I used to fly 100,000 miles a year, and spent a lot of
time trying to stay in shape in hotel pools.

The following worked for me:

I visited the zoo and watched the pinnepeds (Seals, Seal Lions) doing lap
after lap, back and forth, in what could not have been more than a 10 yard
stretch of open water.  They did great flip turns.  They looked great
(though not particularly happy).

Anyway, whenever I swim in a short pool I visualize the Zoo Seals and
pretend that that is what I am.  I just kind of tune out and get into a
rhythm.  After a few laps, I don't even have to count strokes; it just
becomes automatic and even relaxing.  I have been able to get some
reasonably serviceable and not unenjoyable 45-60 minute workouts in some
hotel pools which were little more than large bathtubs.

-Larry Weisenthal

 
 
 

Doing lengths in a short pool

Post by Fraz » Tue, 26 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

>Greetings all!

>For the last two years I have not had regular access to a 25 metre (or
>25 year) pool.  My apartment complex has a pool that I can easily
>access, but it is only 13 yards long.  And this seems to be what I am
>stuck with.
<...snip...>
>Any thoughts about significantly increasing drag in the pool OR
>other methods for dealing with a short pool would be greatly appreciated.

Swim Shop (in the UK - presumably available elsewhere) sell a waist harness for
just this purpose - you get the swimming, but remain tethered to the wall by
this elastic rope.  Kind of like doing bunghee horizontally in water  :-)

-Fraz-

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Doing lengths in a short pool

Post by JeanneS7 » Mon, 09 Oct 1995 04:00:00

1.  Another swimmer at the Y suggested to me "swim diagonally" or "swim
the perimeter".

2.  I have discovered that my YMCA card is generally honored by
out-of-town Y's.  I used that privlege in Chicago recently and found an
excellent pool at the Y in Niles..