Weight Lifting for Young Swimmer

Weight Lifting for Young Swimmer

Post by Doug.Gilli » Wed, 01 Feb 1995 01:05:55


I would like to learn more about weight lifting for swimmers, especially
for young (15 yr. old male) swimmers.  I understand that someone this
young shouldn't lift weights too much.  I'm thinking about maybe
30-45 minutes twice a week to increase strength.  Of course, I wouldn't
have him do any lifting without the approval of his coach.

I would appreciate any related information: any good books about weight
lifting for swimming, any general information, and any specific
information/opinions related to YOUNG swimmers lifting weights.

Thanks,

Doug Gilliam

 
 
 

Weight Lifting for Young Swimmer

Post by Sandy Knig » Fri, 03 Feb 1995 02:45:32

: I would like to learn more about weight lifting for swimmers, especially
: for young (15 yr. old male) swimmers.  I understand that someone this
: young shouldn't lift weights too much.  I'm thinking about maybe
: 30-45 minutes twice a week to increase strength.  Of course, I wouldn't
: have him do any lifting without the approval of his coach.

: I would appreciate any related information: any good books about weight
: lifting for swimming, any general information, and any specific
: information/opinions related to YOUNG swimmers lifting weights.

: Thanks,

: Doug Gilliam

My daughter is 10 years old and her coach wants her to do dry land weight training.  
I am not too happy about this as I am sure she is too young.  The sessions that she
will have are ~30 minutes of very light weight repetitions, 2 times per week.

Should I be concerned or is this OK?

Sandy

 
 
 

Weight Lifting for Young Swimmer

Post by DPauwe » Fri, 03 Feb 1995 07:16:48

I'm a 17-year-old swimmer (slightly older) who weight trains regularly as
part of my training.  Typically, we lift about what you suggested - 30-45
minutes, 2-3 times a week.  Our standard weightlifting circuit consists of
bench press, leg press, lat pulls, upright rows, leg curls, leg
extensions, and a double-arm curl.
We do a warm-up set of pullups, dips, and lunges before we get going, and
usually we do three sets of ten at each station, increasing in weight each
time if possible.

On the days we don't do heavy weightlifting, we do a routine dryland
circuit, with exercises such as Vasa trainers, flys, medicine ball throws,
inclined situps, squat jumps w/ weight, jump rope, tricep extensions, and
recovery with stretch cords.  We go by the clock on these rather than by
reps - for instance, we'll go one minute on, fif*** seconds off, one
minute on, then switch stations.

Pullups and dips are also good exercises - periodically throughout the
season my
team tests for a maximum number of each, just as a benchmark to show us
our improvements.

I hope this is of use.

 
 
 

Weight Lifting for Young Swimmer

Post by BRIAN S. WILSO » Fri, 03 Feb 1995 11:27:52

Quote:

> I would like to learn more about weight lifting for swimmers, especially
> for young (15 yr. old male) swimmers.  I understand that someone this
> young shouldn't lift weights too much.  I'm thinking about maybe
> 30-45 minutes twice a week to increase strength.  Of course, I wouldn't
> have him do any lifting without the approval of his coach.

> I would appreciate any related information: any good books about weight
> lifting for swimming, any general information, and any specific
> information/opinions related to YOUNG swimmers lifting weights.

> Thanks,

> Doug Gilliam

Dear Doug,

        I am a recently retired collegiate swimmer from North Carolina
State University.  I had to quit do to shoulder tendonitis and a rotator
cuff injury.  I have been swimming competetively for 15 years.  I began
lifting when I was 16, so I can relate to your situation.  If you've
begun to hit puberty, then it is okay for you to lift without fear.  The
problem about being too young is that if you haven't hit your growth
spurt, you may stunt your growth.  Assuming that you have begun your
growth spurt, I suggest lifting 3-4 times per week.  My personal
beginning routine was to do upper body lifting on Monday and Wedensday,
and lower body stuff on Tuesday and Friday.  For upper body, I did bench
press, lat pull-downs, tricep and bicep lifts, and shoulder extensions.  
The lower body things were squats, leg-extensions, calf raises, leg
curls, and of course, crunches for yer abs!  Be sure that before you try
any of these things on your own, you get someone to show you the correct
techniques for each excercise.  By doing them incorrectly, you'll do more
damage than good.  Good Luck; remember, if it hurts when you lift with
it, stop and rest, and don't workout that muscle until it recovers!

                                        Scott Wilson

 
 
 

Weight Lifting for Young Swimmer

Post by William Farie » Sat, 04 Feb 1995 13:36:43

Quote:

> I would like to learn more about weight lifting for swimmers, especially
> for young (15 yr. old male) swimmers.  I understand that someone this
> young shouldn't lift weights too much.  I'm thinking about maybe
> 30-45 minutes twice a week to increase strength.  Of course, I wouldn't
> have him do any lifting without the approval of his coach.

> I would appreciate any related information: any good books about weight
> lifting for swimming, any general information, and any specific
> information/opinions related to YOUNG swimmers lifting weights.

> Thanks,

> Doug Gilliam

I don't consider 15 to be too young to be lifting...in fact, I know
plenty of swimmers who started at that age. Be careful, though,
because many swimmers see lifting as the "easy way" to gain an
advantage in the sport, because it can have some fairly significant
results in the short term (a year). However, lifting all the weights
in the world won't help someone with lousy stroke technique. Joe
Hudepohl didn't lift until college and as a junior in high school
(age 16) he went 1:34.9 in the 200 free. Also, if the coach doesn't
have an organized lifting program in the first place, talk to him
about it first. Good luck!

Bill Faries

 
 
 

Weight Lifting for Young Swimmer

Post by Detlef Hallerman » Wed, 08 Feb 1995 01:37:57


writes:

Quote:
> Path:

magma.Mines.Colorado.EDU!csn!ncar!gatech!swrinde!sgiblab!rpal.rockwell.com!news
Stanford.EDU!usenet

Quote:

> Newsgroups: rec.sport.swimming
> Subject: Re: Weight Lifting for Young Swimmer
> Date: 3 Feb 1995 04:36:43 GMT
> Organization: Stanford University
> Lines: 30


> NNTP-Posting-Host: suites-powermac.stanford.edu


> > I would like to learn more about weight lifting for swimmers, especially
> > for young (15 yr. old male) swimmers.  I understand that someone this
> > young shouldn't lift weights too much.  I'm thinking about maybe
> > 30-45 minutes twice a week to increase strength.  Of course, I wouldn't
> > have him do any lifting without the approval of his coach.

> > I would appreciate any related information: any good books about weight
> > lifting for swimming, any general information, and any specific
> > information/opinions related to YOUNG swimmers lifting weights.

> > Thanks,

> > Doug Gilliam

Just a quick note.

At the age of 15 I was still much to lanky and gangly to begin weights.  I had
the size (height) but not the muscle mass to protect the joints.  As a result
of pre-mature (for my build) Wt. room training and water skiing, I tore the
miniscus cartilage in my left knee.  The doctors removed the entire interior m
iniscus from that knee.  At 17 I began lifting for basketball.  Although I was
much larger than the other boys, I always lagged behind in terms of weights and
strength.  The primary reason.... I didn't stop growing until 22, and didn't
stop filling out until 26.

Now I lift weights as part of my Masters training, but my early endevors in the
weight room (I would like to note that this weight training was under proper
supervision, i.e. coaches) were 1) too soon for my body size and physique, and
2.) did not show results until I started to fill out some time during college.

The reason for all of this babble.  Don't judge whether a child is ready for
the weight room by their age.  Instead consider the phase of growth their
bodies are in.  Some kids can start in the weight room at 13, others like
myself recieve no benefit until 20 or later.

Good luck

DETLEF