High School Swimming vs Water Polo vs Club Swimming

High School Swimming vs Water Polo vs Club Swimming

Post by Coach Sw » Thu, 18 May 1995 04:00:00


The iInternet has been fantastic for great information.  I am looking for
letters from swimmers and coaches to put on my bulletin board at my pool.
Here is the problem.  I have nothing against Water Polo, I coach Swimming
and Track.  My knowledge is limited.  My swimming program has
traditionally been one of the strongest and largest around.  I got a Water
Polo program started five years ago and now it is taking away swimmirs
from competitive swimming.

I want the high school swimmers to support my community swimming club.
The club is new and growing.  95% of my club swimmers are from other high
schools. Very few of my high school swimmers train at all during the off
season.  Water Polo meets at another high school two times a week.  How
would you suggest I motivate them to train more with the club?  Year
round?  

I do not want to see the swimming program fall apart.  E Mails would be
appreciated.  I will write back.  I'm writing this before school and I am
running a little late.  Thanks, CoachSwim

 
 
 

High School Swimming vs Water Polo vs Club Swimming

Post by Big J » Thu, 01 Jun 1995 04:00:00

I have seen the same problem at my high school.  I am a graduate of
Bellarmine College Prep.  We have been stare champions, and even national
champions at both swimming and water polo.  I have been more of a black
line person myself, and I have been swimming since age 5, so I stopped
playing polo sophmore year.  Most people enter high school with little
swimming experience, and they naturally tend to enjoy water polo more
becaue it is a team sport, and a little more interesting.  I found that I
was somewhat of an outcast in high school because I quit water polo for
swimming.

In short, it is very difficult to get people to swim all year round when
water polo is seen as a more exciting sport.  One drawing factor towards
swimming might be the chance of getting a college scholarship.  I think
there are only about 45 college waterpolo teams out there (the NCAA limit
is about 40).  If the number dips below 40 then there are no more
scholarships because all of the teams will have to go to club teams.
There are numerous oppertunities for swimmers to get scholarships in
colllege.  This is the only factor that swimming has over water polo.



He just keeps on swimming and swimming and swimming and swimming...

Visit my www devoted toward swimming..feedback and ideas welcomed

http://www/kfu.com/~jethro/swim.html

 
 
 

High School Swimming vs Water Polo vs Club Swimming

Post by The K » Thu, 01 Jun 1995 04:00:00

I thin k this is really a damn shame; especially here in Northern
California where water polo is so popular.  Unlike most parts of the
country (where polo gets little participation) Cali touts a huge polo
following which attracts highly talented swimmers away from swimming.

I say it is a shame because I have seen future national calibur swimmers
fall to the way-side due to their lack of dedication to swimming and the
lure of polo.  In a basic sense, swimming takes more effort:  you have to
be in the water training hard twice a day, doing a decent amount of
yardage.  And water polo at most high school levels, does not ask that
kind of effort.  So what you get is a perceived notion that polo is fun
and easier, and swimmers just migrate that direction.

I think the result is quite evident.  With the exception of a few highly
gifted individuals, swimming suffers.  It is just too hard to complete a
full swimming training cycle when water polo userps a full quarter or
semester of a swimmer's time.  Then add in the tug of war that high school
and club coaches play in terms of where and when a swimmer trains, and the
you find swimming being at the losing end of the battle.

I look at California's Central Coast  High School Swimming Championships
held recently at Stanford University.  All in all, the meet was SLOW.
Even absent were the usual standout performances characteristic of a few
swimmers.   I think these mediocre performances were a direct result of a
season stretched too thin.  I watched potential standout swimmers put in
OK swims, many of these folks the same people who spend 3-6 months playing
polo.

All I can say, is that Northern Cali will have a hard time facing the
competition that abounds in the rest of the US where serious swimming
takes place.  Just my 2 cents.

Quote:

> I have seen the same problem at my high school.  I am a graduate of
> Bellarmine College Prep.  We have been stare champions, and even national
> champions at both swimming and water polo.  I have been more of a black
> line person myself, and I have been swimming since age 5, so I stopped
> playing polo sophmore year.  Most people enter high school with little
> swimming experience, and they naturally tend to enjoy water polo more
> becaue it is a team sport, and a little more interesting.  I found that I
> was somewhat of an outcast in high school because I quit water polo for
> swimming.

> In short, it is very difficult to get people to swim all year round when
> water polo is seen as a more exciting sport.  One drawing factor towards
> swimming might be the chance of getting a college scholarship.  I think
> there are only about 45 college waterpolo teams out there (the NCAA limit
> is about 40).  If the number dips below 40 then there are no more
> scholarships because all of the teams will have to go to club teams.
> There are numerous oppertunities for swimmers to get scholarships in
> colllege.  This is the only factor that swimming has over water polo.



> He just keeps on swimming and swimming and swimming and swimming...

> Visit my www devoted toward swimming..feedback and ideas welcomed

> http://www/kfu.com/~jethro/swim.html

--
Jason***s

http://SportToday.org/:80/~jdog/

 
 
 

High School Swimming vs Water Polo vs Club Swimming

Post by Jeffrey J. Jo » Thu, 01 Jun 1995 04:00:00


  > I have seen the same problem at my high
  > school.  I am a graduate of Bellarmine
  > College Prep.  We have been stare champions,
  > and even national champions at both swimming
  > and water polo.  I have been more of a black
  > line person myself, and I have been swimming
  > since age 5, so I stopped playing polo
  > sophmore year.  Most people enter high school
  > with little swimming experience, and they
  > naturally tend to enjoy water polo more
  > becaue it is a team sport, and a little more
  > interesting.  I found that I was somewhat of
  > an outcast in high school because I quit
  > water polo for swimming.  In short, it is
  > very difficult to get people to swim all year
  > round when water polo is seen as a more
  > exciting sport.  One drawing factor towards
  > swimming might be the chance of getting a
  > college scholarship.  I think there are only
  > about 45 college waterpolo teams out there
  > (the NCAA limit is about 40).  If the number
  > dips below 40 then there are no more
  > scholarships because all of the teams will
  > have to go to club teams.  There are numerous
  > oppertunities for swimmers to get
  > scholarships in colllege.  This is the only
  > factor that swimming has over water polo.    

I went through a similar problem a few years ago.  I, too swam for a state
champion H.S. swim team for 4 years but did not play water polo for my H,S,
team.  When I went to college, a combination of pure laziness and dislike for
my new coach turned me away from NCAA swimming.  I decided to play water polo
for 3 years for my college's club team (there were no NCAA varsity teams in
the midwest at the time).  It was loads of fun, both in and out of the pool.
Although I wasn't the best water polo player, I could outswim anybody out
there to the ball.

After college, I decided to join masters swimming to lose the weight of all
the beers I consumed in college.  With a full-time job I found that swimming
fit into my schedule more easily than joining a local water polo club team in
New Jersey.  Although I played water polo with a team in the 1994 Garden
State Games (I was thoroughly rusty and got creamed), I'm pretty certain I'll
stick with masters swimming.

Jeff

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High School Swimming vs Water Polo vs Club Swimming

Post by Bryan E. Esqui » Sun, 04 Jun 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

>I say it is a shame because I have seen future national calibur swimmers
>fall to the way-side due to their lack of dedication to swimming and the
>lure of polo.  In a basic sense, swimming takes more effort:  you have to
>be in the water training hard twice a day, doing a decent amount of
>yardage.  And water polo at most high school levels, does not ask that
>kind of effort.  So what you get is a perceived notion that polo is fun
>and easier, and swimmers just migrate that direction.

        Funny you should say that.  While I was still swimming in high
        school, we played water polo for part of practice.  It's really
        good for exercising the leg muscles.  I never had a chance to play
        water polo for my high school because they started the program
        right after I graduated.
        True, swimming does take a lot of energy and training (part of the
        reason I decided not to swim in college), but I'm sure with the
        amount of treading water you need to go through from water polo,
        I'm sure the workout are pretty rough too.
        Treading water for 5 minutes with your arms above your head in
        streamline position in not my idea of fun.

Quote:
>I look at California's Central Coast  High School Swimming Championships
>held recently at Stanford University.  All in all, the meet was SLOW.
>Even absent were the usual standout performances characteristic of a few
>swimmers.   I think these mediocre performances were a direct result of a
>season stretched too thin.  I watched potential standout swimmers put in
>OK swims, many of these folks the same people who spend 3-6 months playing
>polo.

        I knew a couple of people who swam there, and I find it hard to
        believe that some of them had OK times.  I've seen them workout
        and they put in a lot of effort.  I haven't spoken to them
        since, but I'm sure that they've put a lot of effort into it.

Quote:
>All I can say, is that Northern Cali will have a hard time facing the
>competition that abounds in the rest of the US where serious swimming
>takes place.  Just my 2 cents.

        That could be.  No. Cal just doesn't have the "swimming desire" that
        the rest of the nation has.  I don't think it can be attributed to
        water polo, but I do notice this.


  You think the only people who are people          ||  Marc Escuro [R]
  Are the people who look and think like you        ||  (aka Bryan Esquire)
  But if you walk the footsteps of a stranger       ||  (aka Bucko)
  You learn things you never knew, you never knew.  ||  UC, Santa Cruz

 
 
 

High School Swimming vs Water Polo vs Club Swimming

Post by Joshua Wols » Tue, 06 Jun 1995 04:00:00

I have had a similar experience, and I think that some of you are missing
the flip side of the coin.  I did not become involved with
competitive swimming until high school, and I loved it.  However, I
opted not to try it in college because I had too many other
activities I wanted to take a shot at.  However, I did pick up water
polo, and it has just kept me interested in swimming.  Also, some of my
friends have told me they would be in the water more in the
off-season if it were to play polo rather than to force themselves
to get up and train.  While it may not be the same as a true workout
for a swimmer, it is better than none if you cannot get yourself out
of bed during the off-season.  As for being more or less fun, well,
people should probably gravitate to the activity they most enjoy,
lest we forget that that was the purpose for which we all started
swimming.  So, if people do like polo more, then those people should
enjoy themselves and not feel bad about not fulfilling some nebulous
potential that people see for them.



 >
 >I say it is a shame because I have seen future national calibur swimmers
 >fall to the way-side due to their lack of dedication to swimming and the
 >lure of polo.  In a basic sense, swimming takes more effort:  you have to
 >be in the water training hard twice a day, doing a decent amount of
 >yardage.  And water polo at most high school levels, does not ask that
 >kind of effort.  So what you get is a perceived notion that polo is fun
 >and easier, and swimmers just migrate that direction.

--
Always remember:
"I'm from a small town, they think so small, they use small words.
But not me, I'm smarter than that.  I've worked it out."--Peter Gabriel
                                                          in Big Time
Any questions?
Alrighty then, I expect to hear from you soon!
Josh

 
 
 

High School Swimming vs Water Polo vs Club Swimming

Post by JSGah » Mon, 19 Jun 1995 04:00:00

I think that there doesn't have to be a choice, at least not in high
school.  I know I would have quite swimming sooner than I did, were it not
for my involvement in water polo.  Ultimately, I focused on polo...but
that was the right choice for me: it helped me get into a great school, I
played all four seasons there, and now enjoy the sport on an Open level.

I still love to swim as well, probably more so than several of my swimming
teammates from high school.

Unless you are a long-distance swimmer, there is no reason why the work
you put in for polo won't benefit your swimming.  Long-distance swimmers
need the months of yardage for the types of events in which they
excel...such training won't work for everyone, though.  I found that my
times dropped noticably in the years where I was doing both swimming and
polo...perhaps due to increased strength (especially legs), increased
overall athletic ability, refreshed mental attitude.

It is a very individual thing.  Above all else, though, make sure you
enjoy whatever you choose to do.  We are talking about sports here after
all.

Good luck!
--Jennifer Sachi Gahan

 
 
 

High School Swimming vs Water Polo vs Club Swimming

Post by Tom Brid » Tue, 20 Jun 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

> I think that there doesn't have to be a choice, at least not in high
> school.  I know I would have quite swimming sooner than I did, were it not
> for my involvement in water polo.  Ultimately, I focused on polo...but
> that was the right choice for me: it helped me get into a great school, I
> played all four seasons there, and now enjoy the sport on an Open level.

> I still love to swim as well, probably more so than several of my swimming
> teammates from high school.

> Unless you are a long-distance swimmer, there is no reason why the work
> you put in for polo won't benefit your swimming.  Long-distance swimmers
> need the months of yardage for the types of events in which they
> excel...such training won't work for everyone, though.  I found that my
> times dropped noticably in the years where I was doing both swimming and
> polo...perhaps due to increased strength (especially legs), increased
> overall athletic ability, refreshed mental attitude.

> It is a very individual thing.  Above all else, though, make sure you
> enjoy whatever you choose to do.  We are talking about sports here after
> all.

> Good luck!
> --Jennifer Sachi Gahan


This is very interesting but I have seen quite the opposite on our team
here.  Our sprinters come back just as tired as the distance swimmers.
They may be in great shape, but its the WRONG kind of shape.  Sure they
have great aerobic ability, but the technique and the anaerobic and the
threshold are all missing!  The big chunk of the training at out
highschool/club team is threshold and anaerobic.  You dont get the same
quality work, even if it is the same quantity.

--
"Good...Bad...I'm Just the Guy with the gun." --  
Army of Darkness, greatest movie ever made.
"Failure is NOT an option."  
Commander Brik _The Middle of Nowhere_